How to set the program defaults in XFCE

Are you looking to change the default programs on your XFCE desktop on Linux? Not sure how to do it? We can help! Follow along as we go over how to set the program defaults in XFCE!

Set “Preferred Applications” in XFCE

Like many other desktop environments, XFCE has a “Preferred Applications” area in settings that let users decide the default programs that the desktop environment will use. To access the “Preferred Applications” area in XFCE, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: Open up the XFCE Application Finder by pressing Alt + F2 on the keyboard.

Step 2: In the Application Finder window, write out “xfce4-settings-manager” in the text box, and click on the “Launch” button to instantly gain access to the XFCE settings area. Alternatively, search for the XFCE settings in your app menu.

xfce4-settings-manager

Step 3: In the XFCE settings area, locate the “Personal” section. From there, click on the “Preferred Applications” shortcut.

Upon clicking on the “Preferred Application” shortcut in the XFCE settings area window, you will notice the “Preferred Application” window. Follow along below to learn how to change the default apps on your system.

Web Browser

The default web browser on 99% of XFCE-based Linux desktop environments is Firefox or Firefox ESR (Extended Release). The reason that Firefox is often the default is that it is open-source, modern, and fast.

If you’re not happy with using Firefox on your XFCE Linux desktop, you’ll be able to change it by clicking on the “Internet” tab and then switching the drop-down menu under “Web Browser” from “Firefox” to another browser.

Mail Reader

Thunderbird is the email client of choice on most XFCE desktops, as it is reliable, lightweight, and does its job. That said, Thunderbird isn’t the only email client available on Linux, and not everyone likes using it.

If you’re one of those people that loathe using Thunderbird, for whatever reason, you’ll be happy to know that it is possible to change it as the default email client on XFCE. First, click on the “Internet” tab in the “Preferred Applications” area. Then, find the drop-down menu under “Mail Reader” and change it from Thunderbird to the email client you prefer.

File Manager

Thunar is the default file manager in XFCE, and it’s a darn good one. It’s incredibly lightweight, yet manages to pack in incredible features. That said, not everyone wants to use Thunar on XFCE, and that’s ok.

To change the default file manager on XFCE from Thunar, do the following. First, locate the “Utilities” tab, and click on it with the mouse. Then, find “File Manager” and change it from “Thunar” to the file manager you’d like to use.

Terminal Emulator

XFCE’s default terminal emulator is pretty standard as far as terminal apps go. It supports tabs and a lot of essential features you’d expect in a Linux terminal program. However, it’s not the best in the world.

If you’re not interested in using the default terminal app in XFCE, here’s how to change it. First, find the “Utilities” section of “Preferred Applications.” Then, locate “Terminal Emulator” and click on the drop-down menu underneath it to swap to a different terminal app.

File defaults in XFCE with file manager

While XFCE does not have nearly as robust “Preferred Application” options as Mate does, users are still able to change the default apps for many programs via the Thunar file manager. Here’s how to do it.

Step 1: Open up the Thunar file manager on the XFCE desktop.

Step 2: Find the file in the Thunar file manager which you’d like to change the defaults for and right-click on it with the mouse. For example, if you have an MP4 file opening in Totem, but you’d like to change it so the video opens in VLC, locate it, and right-click on it.

Step 3: In the right-click menu in the Thunar file manager, find “Properties” and select it to access the settings for the individual file.

Step 4: Look through the “Properties” window for “Open With.” Once you’ve found it, click on the drop-down menu to change the default program for the file.

Repeat this process for each file you’d like to change the default program association for on XFCE.

Program defaults – Mime Type Editor

While it is possible to change the default programs that files use in the Thunar file manager, it is also possible to do this with the Mime Type Editor. Follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to use it to change default file associations in XFCE.

 Step 1: Press Alt + F2 to open up the Program Finder window. Then write in the command below to access the XFCE Mime Type Editor.

xfce4-mime-settings

Step 2: Find the “filter” box, and type out the name of the file you’d like to change program associations for.

Step 3: Find the “Default Application” column and select “Choose Application.”

Step 4: Choose the new default program for the file.

Repeat the process for all files that you’d like to change the default program association for on the XFCE desktop.

The post How to set the program defaults in XFCE appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to set the program defaults in XFCE

Are you looking to change the default programs on your XFCE desktop on Linux? Not sure how to do it? We can help! Follow along as we go over how to set the program defaults in XFCE!

Set “Preferred Applications” in XFCE

Like many other desktop environments, XFCE has a “Preferred Applications” area in settings that let users decide the default programs that the desktop environment will use. To access the “Preferred Applications” area in XFCE, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: Open up the XFCE Application Finder by pressing Alt + F2 on the keyboard.

Step 2: In the Application Finder window, write out “xfce4-settings-manager” in the text box, and click on the “Launch” button to instantly gain access to the XFCE settings area. Alternatively, search for the XFCE settings in your app menu.

xfce4-settings-manager

Step 3: In the XFCE settings area, locate the “Personal” section. From there, click on the “Preferred Applications” shortcut.

Upon clicking on the “Preferred Application” shortcut in the XFCE settings area window, you will notice the “Preferred Application” window. Follow along below to learn how to change the default apps on your system.

Web Browser

The default web browser on 99% of XFCE-based Linux desktop environments is Firefox or Firefox ESR (Extended Release). The reason that Firefox is often the default is that it is open-source, modern, and fast.

If you’re not happy with using Firefox on your XFCE Linux desktop, you’ll be able to change it by clicking on the “Internet” tab and then switching the drop-down menu under “Web Browser” from “Firefox” to another browser.

Mail Reader

Thunderbird is the email client of choice on most XFCE desktops, as it is reliable, lightweight, and does its job. That said, Thunderbird isn’t the only email client available on Linux, and not everyone likes using it.

If you’re one of those people that loathe using Thunderbird, for whatever reason, you’ll be happy to know that it is possible to change it as the default email client on XFCE. First, click on the “Internet” tab in the “Preferred Applications” area. Then, find the drop-down menu under “Mail Reader” and change it from Thunderbird to the email client you prefer.

File Manager

Thunar is the default file manager in XFCE, and it’s a darn good one. It’s incredibly lightweight, yet manages to pack in incredible features. That said, not everyone wants to use Thunar on XFCE, and that’s ok.

To change the default file manager on XFCE from Thunar, do the following. First, locate the “Utilities” tab, and click on it with the mouse. Then, find “File Manager” and change it from “Thunar” to the file manager you’d like to use.

Terminal Emulator

XFCE’s default terminal emulator is pretty standard as far as terminal apps go. It supports tabs and a lot of essential features you’d expect in a Linux terminal program. However, it’s not the best in the world.

If you’re not interested in using the default terminal app in XFCE, here’s how to change it. First, find the “Utilities” section of “Preferred Applications.” Then, locate “Terminal Emulator” and click on the drop-down menu underneath it to swap to a different terminal app.

File defaults in XFCE with file manager

While XFCE does not have nearly as robust “Preferred Application” options as Mate does, users are still able to change the default apps for many programs via the Thunar file manager. Here’s how to do it.

Step 1: Open up the Thunar file manager on the XFCE desktop.

Step 2: Find the file in the Thunar file manager which you’d like to change the defaults for and right-click on it with the mouse. For example, if you have an MP4 file opening in Totem, but you’d like to change it so the video opens in VLC, locate it, and right-click on it.

Step 3: In the right-click menu in the Thunar file manager, find “Properties” and select it to access the settings for the individual file.

Step 4: Look through the “Properties” window for “Open With.” Once you’ve found it, click on the drop-down menu to change the default program for the file.

Repeat this process for each file you’d like to change the default program association for on XFCE.

Program defaults – Mime Type Editor

While it is possible to change the default programs that files use in the Thunar file manager, it is also possible to do this with the Mime Type Editor. Follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to use it to change default file associations in XFCE.

 Step 1: Press Alt + F2 to open up the Program Finder window. Then write in the command below to access the XFCE Mime Type Editor.

xfce4-mime-settings

Step 2: Find the “filter” box, and type out the name of the file you’d like to change program associations for.

Step 3: Find the “Default Application” column and select “Choose Application.”

Step 4: Choose the new default program for the file.

Repeat the process for all files that you’d like to change the default program association for on the XFCE desktop.

The post How to set the program defaults in XFCE appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How To Fix No Sound On YouTube

YouTube is one of the largest websites to watch videos and listen to thousands of music tracks available on it. While the platform works just fine most of the time, there are times when you may face issues like no sound on YouTube.

If the video plays but you don’t hear any sound, there’s probably an issue with either your system or your web browser. Fixing these items on your computer should bring back the sound of your videos and that’s exactly what you’re going to learn today.

Ensure Your Volume Is Not Turned Off

Although this is most obvious fix when there’s no sound on YouTube, some users have their system sound turned off which causes the no sound on YouTube issue on your computer. You want to make sure your system is allowed to play sounds from any source. Otherwise, other apps and platforms including YouTube won’t be able to play any sound.

To fix it, all you basically need to do is press a button on your keyboard and it’ll get the task done.

  • On your keyboard, look for the Mute button that mutes your system volume. Press the button and it’ll unmute your computer.
  • If the button doesn’t work for some reason, you can press the Volume Increase button and it’ll unmute your system.

Make Sure You Haven’t Muted The Video

Another obvious thing that people often forget about. If you watched your previous video in the mute mode, then all of your future videos will also be muted. That is, until you turn the mute option off.

  • While on your video page on the YouTube website, click on the speaker icon and it’ll unmute your video.
  • If you prefer using a keyboard shortcut, press the M key on your keyboard and it’ll unmute the video if it was muted.

Use An Incognito Window To Fix No Sound On YouTube

Issues related to audio and sound are usually due to the system configuration. However, there are times when a browser issue, such as too many cache files, may also be the cause of why you have no sound on YouTube.

Fixing this issue is easy in most modern browsers as you can open an incognito window. This window doesn’t consider your browsing history or cache files while accessing any websites.

  • If you’re a Google Chrome user, click on the three-dots at the top-right corner and select the New incognito window open. Then open YouTube and play your video.
  • If you’re a Firefox user, click on the three horizontal-lines at the top-right corner and select the New Private Window option.

Use Another Web Browser On Your Computer

If even the incognito window doesn’t fix your no sound on YouTube issue, you might want to switch to another browser to see if the issue still persists. It may be your browser has some core issues and so it prevents YouTube from playing any sounds.

If you’re a Chrome user, you can switch to Firefox and try and play your video. If the video plays the sound without any problems, it’s likely your previous browser had an issue.

You can then either wait for the developer to push an update for your current browser, or you can simply permanently switch to the browser that works with YouTube. If you choose to do the latter, you shouldn’t have much trouble migrating your data as there are a number of ways to export browser files and bring them into your new browser.

Increase Volume In Volume Mixer

Volume Mixer is a utility that can be launched from the system tray and it lets you define volume levels for each app on your computer. It’s worth checking it to see if the volume level for your current browser is muted or is at a very low level that you can’t hear anything.

  • Find the sound icon in the system tray, right-click on it, and select the option that says Open Volume mixer.
  • On the following screen, inside the Applications section, you’ll be able to see the volume levels for each of your apps. Ensure your browser is open at this moment for it to appear in this list.
  • Once you find your browser, drag the volume slider all the way to the top. It increases your volume level.
  • Your videos should now play the sound without any issues.

Fix No Sound On YouTube By Updating The Audio Drivers

If it isn’t just YouTube and you have the no sound issue for your entire machine, you may want to see if your audio drivers are up to date. After all, these sound drivers are what make your computer play sounds, and you should update them if they’ve become obsolete.

  • Use the Cortana search to search for and open Device Manager.
  • Expand the menu that says Sound, video and game controllers.
  • Find your sound card in the list, right-click on it, and select Update driver.
  • It’ll ask if you’ll provide the update files or it should automatically find the required drivers. Choose an appropriate option and proceed with it.
  • Once the drivers are updated, reboot your computer.

Use Audio Troubleshooter To Fix No Sound On YouTube

Windows 10 includes a number of troubleshooters to help you with various issues on your computer. One of these helps you with detecting issues with the sound system on your machine, and you can use it to find and fix the aforementioned issue on your computer.

Once the sound issue is resolved, you’ll no longer have the no sound on YouTube issue.

  • Search for Settings using Cortana search and open it.
  • Click on Update & Security on the following screen.
  • Choose Troubleshoot from the left sidebar on your screen.
  • Scroll down in the right-hand side pane, click on Playing Audio, and choose Run the troubleshooter.
  • Wait for it to detect the issue and help you fix it.

We would like to know which method helped you fix the no sound on YouTube issue on your computer. Your answer is awaited in the comments below.

How to set up the ProtonMail Bridge on Linux

The ProtonMail Bridge allows Linux users to use their ProtonMail account with traditional email accounts. Even ones that do not support ProtonMail, or it’s sophisticated encryption features by default.

Setting up the ProtonMail Bridge on Linux is tricky for new Linux users, but not impossible. If you’re a fan of ProtonMail and want to use your account on your favorite Linux email app, follow along with this guide to get it running!

Note: using the ProtonMail bridge requires a paid account. To upgrade your account, click here.

Installing the ProtonMail Bridge app on Linux

On the official ProtonMail website, it states that there is a version for Microsoft Windows, Apple MacOS, and Linux. However, the Linux button is greyed out and unclickable. When you hover over it, it says to “email for details,” and it’s marked as a beta application.

While it’s true that the developers of ProtonMail Bridge do not make it easy to download the app from their website, there’s no need to contact ProtonMail to get your hands on the latest version of the Bridge app. Why? Someone has placed the program in the Flatpak app store, and it works quite well!

Note: if you do not like Flatpak and would prefer another way to install and use the ProtonMail Bridge application on your system, your best bet is to contact ProtonMail. Ask them about participating in the Linux beta! The contact information is located on this page.

To start the installation of the ProtonMail Bridge application on your Linux PC, start by launching a terminal window on the Linux desktop. Press Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard.

Once the terminal window is open, install the “flatpak” package on your Linux system with your computer’s package manager. Or, follow our guide to learn how to install it on various Linux distributions.

When the “flatpak” package is installed, the Flatpak runtime is ready to go. The next step is to add the Flathub app store to your Linux PC. To do that, use the flatpak remote-add command down below.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

After adding the Flathub app store to your Linux PC, use the flatpak install command below to install the ProtonMail Bridge program. Keep in mind that when you run this command, the Flatpak runtime will also install various dependencies and tools that the app needs to function correctly.

flatpak install flathub ch.protonmail.protonmail-bridge

Assuming the flatpak install command runs successfully, you will have the latest version of the ProtonMail Bridge app set up on your Linux PC. Now, open it up by searching for “ProtonMail Bridge” in the app menu, or by running the following flatpak run command down below in a terminal window.

flatpak run ch.protonmail.protonmail-bridge

Set up the ProtonMail Bridge

Start the ProtonMail Bridge setup process by launching the app (if you haven’t already.) When the program is open, follow the step-by-step instructions outlined below to get it working.

Step 1: The first step in setting up ProtonMail is installing a compatible email account. As of now, the best email app that works with ProtonMail Bridge is Mozilla Thunderbird. Follow this tutorial to install the latest Thunderbird if you do not already have it installed.

Step 2: Go to the ProtonMail Bridge and log in with your account and password. Then, locate the “Mailbox configuration” button and click it. It will provide you with the correct configurations for Thunderbird.

Step 3: Launch Thunderbird on your PC. When it starts up, the new account wizard will appear. Enter your ProtonMail email address into the “Email address” box.

Step 4: Locate the “Password” box and copy the password from the ProtonMail Bridge mailbox configuration window. Be sure to check the box next to “Remember password” so that you do not have to re-enter the password each time Thunderbird is opened.

Step 5: Find the “Manual config” button and click on it. Selecting this button will reveal advanced configuration options for Thunderbird.

Fill out all of the text boxes in the Thunderbird with the information from both the IMAP and SMTP settings in the ProtonMail Bridge mailbox configuration window. All passwords must be set to “Normal password.”

Step 6: Find the “re-test” button at the bottom of the account creation window and click it. It will test the connection settings you have added to Thunderbird and assess if the information is acceptable.

Step 7: Locate the “Advanced config” button at the bottom-left section of the account creation window and click on it. Selecting the “Advanced config” button will force Thunderbird to accept ProtonMail Bridge’s unique account settings.

Step 8: When the “Advanced config” window appears, do not change anything, as your information is already entered. Instead, select the “OK” button to confirm the account information is correct to add your ProtonMail account information to Thunderbird.

Step 9: Upon adding your ProtonMail account to Thunderbird, you will see a pop-up window appear. This pop-up window says, “Add Security Exception.”  Select the “Confirm Security Exception” button.

Please note that there is no actual security concern. The address in Thunderbird (127.0.0.1) is the localhost, which is your computer, running the encrypted ProtonMail Bridge app.

You will need to confirm a security exception twice. One for 127.0.0.1, and one for 127.0.0.1:1025. Keep in mind that the 127.0.0.1:1025 security exception prompt may not appear until you attempt to send an email.

After confirming both security exceptions, your ProtonMail messages will load into Thunderbird. Enjoy!

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