How to install the Flatery icon theme on Linux

Flatery is a new icon theme (currently in Beta) that showcases beautiful flat design. If you love icon themes like Papirus, Paper, and others, you should check out Flatery too! Here’s how to get it working on Linux!

Downloading Flatery on Linux 

The Flatery icon theme is available to all Linux users through the Gnome-look.org theme website, as well as on GitHub, as source files. In this guide, we’ll focus on Gnome-look, as it is the most user-friendly way to download the icon files. To download a copy of the Flatery icon theme for your Linux PC, do the following.

First, head over to the Flatery icon theme page on Gnome-look.org. Once there, find the “Files” tab, and click on it with the mouse. After clicking on the “Files” tab, you will notice 11 download choices. Look through the 11 download choices until you’ve found the one you like. Then, click on the blue button in the “DL” column to download the icons to your Linux PC.

Extracting Flatery on Linux

Icon themes on Linux only work if they are in a folder with the icon’s name. As a result, we must extract the contents of the Flatery icon theme archive downloaded from Gnome-look.org, before attempting to install the theme on your Linux PC.

To start the extraction, open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. Once the terminal window is open, follow the extraction commands outlined below that correspond with the theme pack you have downloaded to your Linux PC.

First, CD into the “Downloads” directory where your icon files were extracted.

cd ~/Downloads

Traditional Flatery icons

To extract the traditional Flatery icons on Linux, run the following command.

tar xvf Flatery.tar.xz

Flatery dark

Extract Flatery Dark with the command below.

tar xvf Flatery-Dark.tar.xz

Flatery Pink

Need to extract Flatery Pink? Run the command below.

tar xvf Flatery-Pink.tar.xz

Flatery Blue

Extract the Flatery Blue theme pack with the following command.

tar xvf Flatery-Blue.tar.xz

Flatery Yellow

To extract the Flatery Yellow icon pack, run the command below in a terminal.

tar xvf Flatery-Yellow.tar.xz

Flatery Teal

To extract Flatery Teal, execute the following command in a terminal window.

tar xvf Flatery-Teal.tar.xz

Flatery Orange

To extract Flatery Orange, run the command below in a terminal.

tar xvf Flatery-Orange.tar.xz

Flatery Sky

Need to get your hands on Flatery Sky? Run the command below.

tar xvf Flatery-Sky.tar.xz

Flatery Indigo

Flatery Indigo can be extracted with the following command.

tar xvf Flatery-Indigo.tar.xz

Flatery Master

Want to extract Flatery Master? Run the command below in a terminal window.

tar xvf flatery-master.tar.gz

Installing Flatery on Linux

There are multiple ways to install the Flatery icon theme on Linux. The first method of installation is single-user. The single-user installation allows only the user that installs the icon theme to access it. The second method of installation is system-wide, which makes the icon files available to all users, regardless of if they’ve installed it or not. In this guide, we will cover both.

Single-user

To install the Flatery icon theme in single-user mode, start out by launching a terminal window. Once the terminal window is open, use the mkdir -p command to create a new directory inside of your home directory with the name of “.icons.”

mkdir -p .icons

With the new folder created, it is time to move the terminal session into the “Downloads” directory, where the Flatery icon files were extracted earlier in the guide. Using the CD command, move into “Downloads.”

cd ~/Downloads

Using the mv command, install the Flatery icon theme in single-user mode by placing the files into “.icons.”

mv Flatery*/ ~/.icons/

System-wide

To install the Flatery icon theme in system-wide mode, start out by opening up a terminal window. Once the terminal window is open, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory, where the Flatery icon files were previously extracted.

cd ~/Downloads

Once inside of the “Downloads” directory, elevate the command-line session to the root user, as it is required to install the icons in system-wide mode.

sudo -s

Install the icons into the /usr/share/icons/ directory using the following mv command below.

Flatery*/ /usr/share/icons/

Activating Flatery on Linux

The Flatery icon theme is set up on your Linux PC, but you won’t be able to use it until it is set as the default icon theme on the desktop environment you use. To set it as default, do the following. First, launch “Settings” and look for “Appearance” or “Icons.” Then, change the default icon theme to “Flatery.”

Can’t figure out how to change the default icons on your Linux PC? Check out the links in the list below to learn how to customize the icons on the Linux desktop you currently use.

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How to install the Uos icon theme on Linux

Have you ever used the Deepin desktop environment on your Linux PC? Do you like the icon theme? Stopped using Deepin but miss using the beautiful icon theme? Check out Uos! It’s the Deepin icon theme, but for any desktop environment on Linux. In this guide, we’ll go over how to set it up on any Linux OS desktop environment.

Downloading Uos on Linux

The Uos icon theme is available for download on the Gnome-look theme website. To get your hands on the latest release, do the following. First, click this link here to head over to the Uos Gnome-look.org page. Once there, click on the “Files” tab. From there, look to the “DL” column, and click on the blue button. When you select the blue button, a pop-up window will appear. Click on the “Download” button to grab the latest release of Uos.

Another way to download the Uos icon theme on your Linux desktop is via GitHub. However, the GitHub release of the Uos icon theme will not be covered in this guide. If you would like to download the GitHub version of the Uos icon theme, click here.

Extracting Uos on Linux

The Uos icon theme is distributed on Gnome-look.org in a TarXZ archive file. These types of archives are excellent for sharing many files quickly and efficiently. However, Linux cannot use icon files that are in a compressed state. So, before we can go over how to install Uos on your Linux PC, we need to go over how to extract the contents of Uos-fulldistro-icons.tar.xz.

To start the extraction on your computer, launch a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. Once the terminal window is open on the Linux desktop, run the CD command to move the terminal session into the “Downloads” directory, where Uos was downloaded earlier via your internet browser.

cd ~/Downloads

Inside of the “Downloads” directory, make use of the tar xvf command to fully extract the Uos-fulldistro-icons-tar.xz archive file.

tar xvf Uos-fulldistro-icons-tar.xz

Once everything is fully extracted, a folder with the name of Uos-fulldistro-icons will appear in your “Downloads” directory. Take a look at the contents of this directory using the ls command. Viewing the directory once extracted will allow you to confirm that the extraction was successful.

ls Uos-fulldistro-icons/

If nothing shows up when you run the above ls command, try re-running the tar command. When done viewing the folder, move on to the installation portion of the guide to get the Uos icon theme up and running on your Linux PC.

Installing Uos on Linux

The Uos icon theme can be installed in 2 ways on the Linux desktop. The first way to install the Uos icon theme is in single-user mode, a method of installation that allows only the user that installs it access to the icon files. The second method of installation is system-wide, which makes Uos available to every single user on the Linux computer, even if they haven’t installed the icons. In this guide, we’ll go over both methods of installation.

Single-user

To install the Uos icon theme in single-user mode, launch a terminal window. Once the terminal window is open, use the mkdir command to create a new folder with the name of “.icons.” This folder will hold the Uos icon theme files.

mkdir -p ~/.icons

After creating the new “.icons” directory, use the CD command to move the terminal session into the “Downloads” directory in which the Uos icon theme was extracted to previously. Then, using the mv command, place the Uos icon files into the “.icons” directory.

mv Uos-fulldistro-icons/ ~/.icons/

Once the Uos icon files are in the “.icons” directory, the installation is complete.

System-wide

To get the Uos icon theme set up system-wide so that everyone on your Linux PC has access to it, do the following. First, launch a terminal window. After that, use the CD command to move the terminal session from the home directory (~) to the “Downloads” folder where the Uos icon theme was previously extracted.

cd ~/Downloads

Once the terminal session is inside of the “Downloads” directory, you will need to elevate the terminal session from the regular user to the root account. The root account is required for manipulating the /usr/share/icons/ directory, where Uos needs to be placed. To access the root account, run sudo -s.

sudo -s

With the terminal in root mode, run the mv command to place the Uos icon files in /usr/share/icons/.

mv Uos-fulldistro-icons/ /usr/share/icons/

Activating Uos on Linux

The Uos icon theme is installed, but installing it on Linux is not enough. You also need to activate the theme before you can use it. To activate the Uos icon theme on the Linux desktop you use, check out the list of links below.

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How to back up your Linux PC’s icon themes

Do you install icon themes on your Linux PC to spice it up and make it look nice? Do you want to create a backup of these icon files in case of data loss? If so, we can help! Follow along in this guide as we show you how to back up your Linux PC’s icon themes.

Backing up icons stored in ~/.icons

If you install custom icon themes on your Linux PC, in single-user mode, all of these icon files exist in the ~/.icons directory in your home folder. To back up these icon files, you will need to make a complete backup of this directory. In this section of the guide, we will go over how you can quickly create a backup of this directory.

Creating a backup of icon files in the ~/.icons folder on Linux is best done with a TarGZ archive. The fastest way to create a TarGZ archive on Linux is through the terminal. Launch a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. When the terminal window is open, make use of the mkdir command to create a new directory with the name of “icon-backup.”

mkdir -p ~/icon-backup

After making this new folder, use the CD command to move the terminal session into the ~/.icons directory, where all of the single-user icon files are installed.

cd ~/.icons

Inside of the ~/.icons folder, make use of the cp command to make a complete copy of this folder, and place everything into the newly created “icon-backup” directory that you created earlier. Be sure to use the -r command-line switch, as it will allow you to copy recursively.

cp -r * ~/icon-backup

After running this command, all single-user icon files in your home directory will begin copying to the newly created backup folder. This copy command will take a couple of minutes to complete. When the process is complete, you will have all of the single-user icon files on your computer placed into the ~/icon-backup directory.

Once all files are moved into the backup folder, the compression can begin. Using the CD command, move from the ~/.icons directory and into the home folder (~). Then, make use of the tar command to create a compressed archive of the ~/icon-backup directory.

cd ~/

tar -czvf icon-backup.tar.gz ~/icon-backup

The compression will take a few to complete, so be patient. When the process is complete, you will have a new backup archive with the name of icon-backup.tar.gz in your home directory. From here, you can take this backup file and upload it to Dropbox, Google Drive, a home server, or elsewhere.

Restoring the backup

To restore the backup, place icon-backup.tar.gz into your home directory using the Linux file manager. After that, make use of the tar xvf command below to decompress the backup and restore it to its original location in the ~/.icons folder.

tar xvf icon-backup.tar.gz -C ~/.icons/ --strip-components=3

Backing up icons stored in /usr/share/icons/

The other way of installing icon themes on Linux besides single-user mode is the system-wide mode. This method of installation is popular with those who want icon theme files accessible to all users on the system, rather than just one user. If you want to back up icon files in system-wide mode, you must compress all of the contents of /usr/share/icons/.

To start the backup process in system-wide mode, you must create a new directory. This new directory will hold a copy of all of the theme files, which will then be compressed, much like in the single-user backup instructions. To create a new folder, make use of the following mkdir command below.

mkdir -p ~/system-icon-backup

After creating the new “system-icon-backup” directory in your home folder (~), use the sudo -s command to elevate the terminal session to root access, without leaving your current directory.

sudo -s

Once you’ve gotten root access, make a complete copy of all of the icon files in the /usr/share/icons/ directory using the cp command. Be sure to use the -r command-line switch, as it is important and will allow you to make recursive copies.

Note: you must change USERNAME to your username on your Linux PC. For example, if my username is “derrik,” the command willd be /home/derrik/system-icon-backup.

cd /usr/share/icons/
cp -r * /usr/share/icons/ /home/USERNAME/system-icon-backup

When everything is done copying, exit root mode with the exit command. By exiting root mode, you will return to your normal user account.

exit

Once you’re back on your normal user account, create a TarGZ archive of your icon file backup using the tar command.

tar -czvf system-icon-backup.tar.gz ~/system-icon-backup

When the compression process is complete, feel free to take system-icon-backup.tar.gz and upload it to Dropbox, Google Drive, a home server, or elsewhere.

Restoring the backup

To restore the system-wide icon backup, start by placing system-icon-backup.tar.gz in the home directory using the Linux file manager. After that, use the sudo -s command to elevate your command-line session to root access.

sudo -s

One the terminal session has root access, use the tar command below to decompress the backup to the original location.

tar xvf system-icon-backup.tar.gz -C /usr/share/icons/ --strip-components=3

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How to add accent color and dark theme to Windows Search on Windows 10

Windows 10 added a dark theme for its UI and various UWP apps. The theme is partially implemented which means not all UI elements have the dark theme. Windows Search, when opened, will show the dark theme but as soon as you enter a search, the results all appear with a blinding white background.

Windows search accent color and dark theme

To get search results in Windows search in the dark theme, and to add the accent color to it, you need to do the following.

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Go to Personalization.
  3. Select Colors.
  4. Make sure the ‘Choose your color’ dropdown is set to Dark.
  5. Download BeautySearch from Github.
  6. Run the app with admin rights.
  7. Go through the various options; make sure ‘Show accent color on Search Window’ and ‘Show search results in Dark Theme’ are selected. Change the other selections according to your own preferences.
  8. Click ‘Install’.
  9. Windows search will show results in the dark theme, and the accent color will be shown on the top navigation bar.

If the app is blocked from running by Windows security, simply click the ‘See more’ option, and click Run Anyway. You will need to authenticate with admin rights.

Troubleshooting installation

If the app doesn’t work or only works partially, reinstall it. Run the executable with admin rights, make sure every feature you want to use is checked, and click Reintsall. Restart the system after reinstalling the app.

If that doesn’t work, uninstall the app and reinstall it.

  1. Run BeautySearch with admin rights.
  2. Make sure everything is checked.
  3. Click Uninstall.
  4. Once the app has been uninstalled, restart the system.
  5. Run BeautySearch again (with admin rights), and install it.

How it works

BeautySearch is likely modifying registry values which means all the UI changes it is making could have been implemented by Microsoft and an app should not have been needed in the first place. A Windows 10 update might undo these changes and you may have to install the app again. The app does not need to run in the background to work. You can quit it once it has been installed.

Conclusion

BeautySearch doesn’t just modify the look of Windows Search, and the search results it shows. It can also hide the solid color background that Start menu tiles for UWP apps have. This may not be necessary anymore given that they’ll be removed in the new Start menu. It is also able to add the acrylic effect to context menus which didn’t work on our test machine but may work for you. The app will work on Windows 10 1909 and 2004. It’s also expected to work on the next major Windows 10 update.

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How to install the Shamrok GTK theme on Linux

The Shamrock GTK theme is a dark theme adapted from a popular KDE Plasma 5 theme. It uses various shades of black and the color green. If your favorite color is green, and you’re looking for an excellent dark GTK theme, check Shamrock out.

In this guide, we’ll go over how to get your hands on Shamrock GTK and install it on your Linux PC. To start the installation, ensure you are using Gnome Shell, Budgie, Cinnamon, or another GTK-based Linux desktop environment.

Downloading Shamrock GTK

The Shamrok GTK theme is available for download on Gnome-look.org. To download this GTK theme to your computer, click on this link here. Once on the Gnome-look.org page, select the “Files” tab, to view the available files for download.

Once on the “Files” page, look for “Shamrock.zip.” This file is the Shamrock GTK theme files. To download it, click on the blue download button in the “DL” column. After clicking on the button in the “DL” column, a pop-up window will appear. Click on the “Download” button to grab the latest Shamrock GTK theme file on your Linux PC.

Another place you can get the Shamrok GTK theme on your system is through GitHub. However, the GitHub release of the theme really isn’t the best way to download it, as you will need to interact with the Git terminal tool. For more information on the GitHub release of Shamrock, click here.

Extracting Shamrock GTK

The Shamrok GTK theme, as distributed on Gnome-look.org, is a Zip archive. Zip files are supported on Linux, but the easiest way to extract it is with the Unzip program. It’s a command-line utility that can be used to quickly decompress Zip archives.

On many Linux operating systems, the Unzip tool is not installed by default. So, before we can go over how to extract the Shamrock GTK ZIP archive, we must demonstrate how to install the Unzip tool. Open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard.

Once the terminal window is open, follow the command-line installation instructions that correspond with the Linux operating system you currently use to get Unzip set up.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install unzip

Debian

sudo apt-get install unzip

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S unzip

Fedora

sudo dnf install unzip

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install unzip

With the Unzip app set up on your Linux PC, the extraction process can begin. First, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory, as that is where the Shamrock.zip archive is saved by your browser.

cd ~/Downloads

When the terminal window is placed inside of the “Downloads” directory, make use of the unzip command to decompress the Shamrock.zip file.

unzip Shamrock.zip

Once the Unzip tool finishes decompressing the Shamrock.zip archive, a new directory will appear in the “Downloads” folder. This directory is “Shamrock” and contains all of the Shamrock theme files.

Install Shamrock GTK

Those looking to get the Shamrock GTK theme working on Linux can do it in multiple ways. The first way you can get the Shamrock GTK theme set up on Linux is in single-user mode, a method of installation that only works for the user that installs the theme. The second method of installation is the system-wide mode, which allows all users on the system to use the theme, even if they weren’t the ones who installed it.

In this guide, we’ll walk you through installing the Shamrock GTK theme in both ways. To start the installation, open up a terminal window. To open up a terminal window, press Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. Once the terminal window is open, follow the command-line installation instructions that correspond with the method of installation you prefer.

Single-user installation

To start the installation of the Shamrock GTK theme in single-user mode, you must create a new folder with the name of “.themes”. This folder will hold all of the Shamrock GTK theme files. To create the new folder, use the following mkdir command in a terminal window.

mkdir -p ~/.themes

After creating the new folder, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory where the extracted Shamrock GTK theme files are.

cd ~/Downloads

From here, you can install the Shamrock GTK theme into the .themes folder using the following mv command.

mv Shamrock/ ~/.themes

System-wide installation

To start the system-wide installation of the Shamrock GTK theme, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory where the theme files are.

cd ~/Downloads

Once inside of the “Downloads” directory, elevate the terminal session to root by using the sudo -s command.

sudo -s

Finally, install the Shamrock GTK theme to your Linux PC in system-wide mode by entering the following mv command.

mv Shamrock/ /usr/share/themes/

Activating Shamrock GTK

You’ve just installed the Shamrock GTK theme on your Linux PC, but the setup process is not yet done. You still need to activate the theme on your Linux desktop environment. To do this, open up the “Settings” app and make your way to “Appearance” or “Themes”. Then, change the default theme to “Shamrock” to enjoy the new theme. Or, follow one of the tutorials below to learn how to customize your Linux desktop.

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