How to play GTA III on Linux

Grand Theft Auto III is the first video game in the GTA series in 3D. It was released in 2001 and was completely revolutionary. It reworked how the gaming industry views open-world video games and is a classic.

When GTA III was released, it made it to PS2, PC, and the original Xbox. Later on, in its life, it was ported to Android, iOS, and other operating systems. However, it was never ported to Linux. As a result, if you want to replay this classic, you will need to run it through a compatibility tool. In this guide, we’ll show you how to do just that!

Getting GTA III working on Linux

Grand Theft Auto III works decently on the Linux platform. According to ProtonDB, it is rated Gold, so, it’s not going to be flawless.  To start the installation process, open up a terminal window. Then, follow the step-by-step instructions outlined below.

Step 1: To play GTA III on your Linux PC, you will need to install the Linux Steam Client. To install it, follow the command-line installation instructions outlined below.

Ubuntu

Those using Ubuntu Linux will be able to get Steam directly through the Ubuntu software repositories on their system using Apt.

sudo apt install steam

Debian

Debian does have Steam in the “Non-free” software repository. However, it is much faster to install Steam by manually downloading the package. To download Steam, use the wget command below.

wget https://steamcdn-a.akamaihd.net/client/installer/steam.deb

Install Steam on Debian with dpkg.

sudo dpkg -i steam.deb

Arch Linux

Arch Linux has always had Steam available in their software repositories. To install it, use Pacman.

sudo pacman -S steam

Fedora/OpenSUSE

If you plan to play GTA III on Fedora or OpenSUSE, the best way to go is to install the Flatpak release of the Steam client.

Flatpak

You can install Steam as a Flatpak. This is good news, especially if you’re on a distro that makes installing Steam tedious. To start up the installation, follow our guide to set up the Flatpak runtime on your Linux PC. The Flatpak runtime is required, and you will not be able to use Flatpak without it.

Once that’s taken care of, run the flatpak remote-add command to add the Flathub app store to your Flatpak installation. Flathub is where the Linux Steam client is.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

After setting up Flathub, you can install the Steam app on your system. Using the flatpak install command below, get the app working.

flatpak install flathub com.valvesoftware.Steam

Step 2: With the Steam app installed, open up the Steam client and log in with your username and password. Then, find the “Steam” menu, and click on it with the mouse. The “Steam” menu is on the top-left. Inside of the “Steam” menu, click on “Settings” to access the Steam settings area.

Step 3: In the settings area, find “Steam Play” and click on it with the mouse. From here, look for “Enable Steam Play for supported titles” and select the box next to it to turn it on. After that, find the “Enable Steam Play for all other titles” and click on the box next to it.

By enabling these two settings, your Linux Steam Client will be able to run GTA III.

Step 4: Find the “OK” button and click it to save the changes.

Step 5: Find the “STORE” button, and click on it with the mouse to go to the Steam Storefront. Once on the Steam Storefront, locate the search box, and click on it with the mouse. Inside the search box, type “Grand Theft Auto III” and press the Enter key to search for it.

Step 6: In the search results, click on “Grand Theft Auto III” to be taken to the GTA III Storefront page in Steam. Once on the GTA III Storefront page, look for the green “Add to cart” button, and click it to purchase the game.

Step 7: Click on the “LIBRARY” button in Steam to go to your Steam library. Then, search through your games for “Grand Theft Auto III.” Once you’ve found the game in your library, click on it with the mouse to access GTA III’s library page in Steam.

On the library page, look around for a blue “INSTALL” button and click on it with the mouse. Once you click on this button, Steam will begin to download and install GTA III on Linux. Keep in mind that this download may take a bit of time. Be patient!

Step 8: Let Steam install GTA III on your PC. When the process is complete, the blue “INSTALL” button will turn into a green “PLAY” button. Select it to start up GTA III on your Linux PC! It should run great!

Troubleshooting GTA III on Linux

GTA III has a Gold rating on ProtonDB. Gold is not a perfect score, and it indicates that in some instances, Linux users may have issues with the game. For the vast majority of players, GTA III should work just fine. However, if you run into issues getting it to work, do yourself a favor and check out the GTA III  ProtonDB page. It’ll help you fix the problems you run into!

Looking to play GTA San Andreas or GTA Vice City on Linux? We’ve got guides for both.

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How to disable Grub resume on Manjaro Linux

When you use Grub in Manjaro, you may notice that it has a different setup than many other Linux operating systems. Mainly, you may note that the Manjaro Grub configuration makes use of the Grub resume feature. This resume feature makes it so that Grub will remember your boot selection each time you access it.

Having the bootloader remember your selection can be useful, especially if you tire from having to select your boot option each time manually. However, it can also be annoying if you don’t always want to have it remember.

To solve this problem in Manjaro, you can turn off the resume feature. In this guide, we’ll go over how to disable the Grub resume feature by showing you how to edit your Manjaro Grub configuration. To get started, open up a terminal window and follow the instructions outlined below!

Back up Manjaro

Before we can go into how to edit your Grub configuration on Manjaro to remove the resume feature, you must make a backup of your Manjaro system. The reason? Editing Grub configuration files can sometimes go wrong. If you mess something up, it’s a good idea to have a backup that can be restored at a later date.

There are many different ways to back up your Manjaro Linux system. If you’d like an easy, foolproof way to back things up, we recommend Timeshift. There’s also Deja Dup and Kbackup.

Follow the linked tutorials to go over how to create a backup of your Linux system. Then, when the backup process is completed, move on to the next step of the guide. Remember! Backing up is critical!

Back up Manjaro Grub configuration

With your Linux system backed up, we’re still not done.  You’ll also need to make a complete backup of Manjaro’s Grub configuration file. Making a backup of this file is essential, as it will make it incredibly easy to revert if it turns out you miss the resume feature that is turned off in this tutorial.

To make a backup, go to the terminal window and start by elevating it from a traditional user account to the root user. You can access the root account by running the sudo -s command below.

sudo -s

Once the terminal session has root access, make a copy of the Grub configuration with the following cp command down below.

cp /etc/default/grub /etc/default/grub-backup

When the command completes, you will have a second file with the name of “grub-backup.” This backup file has all original configurations and can be restored at any time.

Editing the Grub configuration file

To edit the Grub configuration file on Manjaro, start by opening up a terminal. You can open up a terminal window with Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. Then, when the terminal window is open, use the sudo -s command to enter root access mode. The terminal needs to be root access so that the file can be altered.

sudo -s

Once the terminal window is in root access mode, you can open up the Grub configuration file with the Nano text editor using the command below.

nano -w /etc/default/grub

Inside the Nano text editor, you will see many different lines of text. The first thing you must edit to remove the resume feature in Manjaro is GRUB_DEFAULT=saved. Locate this line in the Nano text editor.

Once you’ve found the GRUB_DEFAULT=saved change the “saved” part of the line to “0”. The line in the Nano text editor should look exactly like the example below.

GRUB_DEFAULT=0

After changing this line, look for the GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT=true line in the Nano text editor and add a # in front of it. By adding the # symbol in front of the line, you’re effectively turning off the GRUB_SAVEDEFAUT=true feature. This is known as “uncommenting.”

Ensure that the configuration file in the Nano text editor looks exactly like the example below.

#GRUB_SAVEDEFAUT=true

Once both lines have been edited, press Ctrl + O on the keyboard. By pressing this keyboard combination, you will bring up Nano’s save function. Press the Enter key on your keyboard to confirm to Nano to export the edits to Manjaro’s Grub configuration file.

Updating your Grub bootloader

With the Grub configuration changed to disable the resume feature, all you’ll need to update your Grub bootloader to reflect the changes. To do this, open up a terminal on the Manjaro desktop and run sudo update-grub.

When Grub is updated, reboot your PC to enjoy the Grub bootloader without the resume feature!

Restoring the backup config

Want to restore resume functionality? Follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: Open up a terminal window and use the sudo -s command to access the root account.

sudo -s

Step 2: Once in root mode, delete the Grub configuration file with rm.

rm /etc/default/grub

Step 3: Restore the backup configuration file with the mv command.

mv /etc/default/grub-backup /etc/default/grub

Step 4: Update Grub with update-grub.

update-grub

Step 5: Reboot your Manjaro PC!

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How to disable Snaps in Ubuntu

Snap packages are quickly becoming the primary way that Ubuntu users consume software. Despite Snaps dominating Ubuntu, many users still opt to avoid Snap packages in favor of Apt packages that have long been available in Ubuntu.

If you’re not a huge fan of Snap packages, but love using Ubuntu, this guide is for you. In it, we’ll go over how you can remove Snap from your Ubuntu system and make it so that your system will no longer have access to the Snap store or anything like that.

Uninstall pre-installed Snap packages from Ubuntu

Every release of Ubuntu Linux has a few Snap packages pre-installed. The reason that some Snaps come installed is that Ubuntu developers like Snaps and want to show users what it can do.

Remove pre-installed Snaps

Before we can deal with removing the Snap runtime from the system, and making it so that it is entirely disabled, we need to remove these Snaps. In Ubuntu 20.04, there are 6 pre-installed Snap packages. These packages are Core, Core18, the Gnome package, common themes, Snapd, and the Snap store.

Sadly, unlike Apt, it isn’t possible to uninstall all of these packages in bulk. You must manually remove each one of these packages by hand.

Note: keep in mind, you may have Snaps installed on your system that we do not cover in the tutorial. To view all installed snaps, do snap list. Then, snap remove packagename.

To uninstall the Core Snap, run sudo snap remove on the “core” package. Please note that you may need to uninstall Core last or close to last, as some of the pre-installed Snaps rely on it.

sudo umount /snap/core* -lf
sudo snap remove core

To get rid of Core18, run the uninstall command on the “core18” package. Please note that this Snap may need to be removed last, as many of the pre-installed Snaps interact with it as a dependency.

sudo snap remove core18

To get rid of Gnome, run the uninstallation command on the “gnome-3-1804” package.

sudo snap remove gnome-3-34-1804

To remove the common GTK theme snap from your system, you must run the uninstallation command on the “gtk-common-themes” package.

sudo snap remove gtk-common-themes

To get rid of the Snapd snap, run the uninstallation command on “Snapd.”

sudo snap remove snapd

Lastly, to remove the Snap package store from your Ubuntu computer, you’ll need to run the uninstallation command on the “snap-store” package.

sudo snap remove snap-store

Uninstall other Snap packages

Once all of the pre-installed Snaps are taken off of the system, run the snap list command. Make sure no other packages exist in the list. If there are more Snp packages shown in the list, you will need to uninstall them. You cannot disable Snap if existing Snaps are mounted and in use. Remember, you can easily uninstall a Snap by doing the following.

Step 1: Run snap list.

Step 2: Look in the “Name” column for the name of the package.

Step 3: Run snap uninstall nameofsnap.

Remove Snapd from Ubuntu

Now that all of the pre-installed Snap packages are removed from your Ubuntu PC, it is time to purge Snapd. Snapd is the background program that handles all of your Snaps, and if you do not remove it, Snaps will still be enabled on Ubuntu.

To purge Snapd, open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt  + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. Then, when the terminal window is open, run the sudo apt remove snapd –purge command.

The remove command will delete Snapd from the system and uninstall it from Ubuntu’s package list. The –purge flag will tell Ubuntu to not only uninstall it but to erase all configuration files and related data from Ubuntu. Purging is essential because, without it, Snapd will leave system files all over your PC.

sudo apt remove snapd --purge

When the command is complete, you’ll have purged the Snap store and any ability to run Snaps from your Ubuntu PC.

Deleting folders

Once the Snapd runtime is removed from your Ubuntu system, your Ubuntu PC will no longer have access to the Snap store or be able to run Snaps via snap install. However, the uninstallation isn’t complete. You still need to delete the Snap folders from your home directory.

First, you must delete the “snap” directory in your home folder. This folder handles all of your system settings for Snap apps. To delete it, run the rm -rf command below.

sudo rm -rf ~/snap

Next, the /var/snap/ folder needs to be deleted. To delete it, run the rm -rf command with the sudo command.

sudo rm -rf /var/snap

Lastly, the /var/lib/snapd folder needs to be deleted. To get rid of it, you’ll need to run rm -rf command with the sudo command.

sudo rm -rf /var/lib/snapd

When all three of these folders are removed from the system, reboot Ubuntu. Once Ubuntu comes back online, it’ll be Snap free! Enjoy!

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How to play Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord on Linux

Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord is a strategy/action RPG for Microsoft Windows. The game was developed by TaleWorlds Entertainment and is a prequel to their previous game Mount & Blade: Warband. In Bannerlord, the player controls their created character as they adventure across the world of Mount & Blade.

If you’d like to enjoy the epic adventure of Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord on your Linux PC, it is possible, but it requires a bit of configuration and tweaking. In this guide, we’ll show you exactly how to do just that! Follow along to get Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord working on Linux!

Getting Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord working

Setting up Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord is a tedious process on Linux because it is rated “Gold” on ProtonDB. Sadly, unlike a lot of other video games, you won’t be able just to install it and go. You must configure it a little to get it working. Follow the step-by-step instructions outlined below to get the game set up.

Step 1: To start the installation process, you must install the Steam Linux client. To get Steam working on Linux, open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Shift + T or Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Then, enter the commands below to get Steam working.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install steam

Debian

wget https://steamcdn-a.akamaihd.net/client/installer/steam.deb
sudo dpkg -i steam.deb

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S steam

Fedora/OpenSUSE

For best results on OpenSUSE and Fedora, install the Flatpak release of Steam.

Flatpak

First, ensure you have the Flatpak runtime installed onto your computer. Then, enter the commands below.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo
flatpak install flathub com.valvesoftware.Steam

Step 2:  Now that Steam is installed, we need to install a custom compatibility tool. This custom compatibility tool is called Glorious Eggroll, and its a special release of Valve’s Proton with various game fixes, including ones for Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord.

To get your hands on the latest GE, use the following wget download command.

wget https://github.com/GloriousEggroll/proton-ge-custom/releases/download/5.11-GE-3-MF/Proton-5.11-GE-3-MF.tar.gz

Step 3: When the file is done downloading, use the mkdir command to create a new folder. This new folder will house the GE compatibility tool you just downloaded.

mkdir -p ~/.steam/root/compatibilitytools.d

Alternatively, if you’re using Flatpak, do the following.

mkdir -p ~/.var/app/com.valvesoftware.Steam/data/Steam/compatibilitytools.d/

Step 4: Extract the contents of the GE archive you downloaded to the newly created folder from step 3. To extract, run the following tar command below.

tar xvf Proton-5.11-GE-3-MF.tar.gz -C ~/.steam/root/compatibilitytools.d/

Or, for Flatpak, do:

tar xvf Proton-5.11-GE-3-MF.tar.gz -C ~/.var/app/com.valvesoftware.Steam/data/Steam/compatibilitytools.d/

Step 5: After extracting the contents of the GE archive into the correct folder, open up Steam for Linux and log in. When you’ve logged into Steam, look for the “Steam” menu in the top-left and click on it with the mouse.

In the “Steam” menu, select “Settings” to open up the Steam settings area. Then, locate the “Steam Play” section, and click on it with the mouse.

Step 6: In the “Steam Play” section, find the “Enable Steam Play” for supported titles, and check it. Then, check “Enable Steam Play for all other titles.”

When both boxes are checked, find “Run other titles with” and click on the drop-down menu next to it. In the drop-down menu, select “Proton-5.11-GE-3-MF,” and click on the “OK” button.

Step 7: Find the “STORE” button in Steam and click on it with the mouse. By selecting this button, you will be brought to the Steam Storefront. From there, find the search box and search for Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord.

Step 8: Click on “Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord” in the search results to move to the Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord store page. Then, locate the “add to cart” button, and click on it to purchase the game.

Step 9: After purchasing the game, find the “LIBRARY” button, and click on it to go to your Steam library. Once there, find “Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord” and select it to access Bannerlord’s Steam library page.

On the Steam library page for Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord, click on the blue “INSTALL” button to install the game onto your computer.

When the installation is complete, the blue “INSTALL” button will become a green “PLAY” button. Click on this button to start up Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord.

Troubleshooting Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord

Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord is not a Platinum rated game on ProtonDB. It’s rated as Gold, so you will run into issues while playing it. Hopefully, the custom release of Proton will mitigate the issues, but it can’t account for everything.

If you run into problems playing Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord on your Linux PC with Proton, be sure to check out its ProtonDB page to report bugs, or to find solutions!

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4 ways to create a bootable USB installer on Linux

The primary way of installing a Linux operating system is from a USB. The problem is, many beginner users do not know how to create a bootable USB installer. In this list, we will go over 4 ways to create a bootable USB installer on Linux.

All of the programs we cover on this list require a USB flash drive of at least 2 GB in size. Before you attempt to follow this list to create a bootable USB, make sure the USB flash drive is adequate.

1. Etcher

The number one way to create a bootable USB installer on Linux is with the Etcher tool. The reason? It’s an incredibly easy program that anyone can figure out. To create a bootable USB installer on Linux with Etcher, do the following.

First, download the Etcher program from the official website. It comes in a ZIP archive and is an AppImage file. Extract the file and double-click on it with the mouse to run the program.

Once the program is open, download the Linux OS you want to create a bootable USB installer with. Then, plug in your USB flash drive. When the drive is plugged in, find the “Flash from file” button in Etcher, and click on it.

Browse for the ISO file you downloaded earlier, and select it to add the ISO file to Etcher. After that, click on the “Select target” button, and choose your USB flash drive.

With the ISO file and target set up in Etcher, click on the “Flash!” button to start the creation process. When it is done, you will have created a bootable USB installer on Linux with Etcher!

2. Gnome Disks

If you’re not a fan of the Etcher application, another easy way to create a bootable USB installer on Linux is with the Gnome Disks application. To start the process, you must install the program.

To install Gnome Disks, open up a terminal window and follow the command-line installation instructions down below that correspond with the Linux OS you currently use.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install gnome-disk-utility

Debian

sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S gnome-disk-utility

Fedora

sudo dnf install gnome-disk-utility

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install gnome-disk-utility

After installing the Gnome Disks program onto your computer, launch it by searching for “Disks” in the app menu. You can also press Alt + F2 on the keyboard and enter the gnome-disk-utility command to run it.

Once the Gnome Disks application is open on your computer, download the Linux ISO file you wish to use to create a bootable USB with. Then, go back to the Gnome Disks app.

Inside of Gnome Disks, look to the sidebar on the left. Locate your USB flash drive, and click on it with the mouse. Then, locate the menu button on the top right. If you can’t find it, it’s to the left of the minimize button.

In the Gnome Disks menu, locate the “Restore Disk Image” button, and click on it with the mouse. Then, select the Linux ISO file to add it to Gnome Disks. Select the “Start Restoring” button to create the bootable USB.

When the process is complete, you’ll have made a bootable Linux USB with Gnome Disks!

3. DD

Many Linux users prefer the terminal console as opposed to using GUI tools. If you’re a command-line fan and want to create a bootable USB, here’s what to do. First, open up a terminal window and use the lsblk command to show a readout of all connected storage devices on your Linux PC. Please make sure that your USB flash drive is connected when this command runs!

lsblk

Look through the lsblk command for the label of your USB flash drive. If you can’t find it, follow this in-depth guide on the subject. It will teach you how to read the lsblk command readout.

Once you’ve figured out your USB flash drive’s label, download the ISO file of the Linux operating system you’d like to create a bootable USB of, and execute the command below.

Note: change /dev/sdX in the command below to reflect the USB flash drive’s label found in lsblk.

sudo dd if=/dev/sdX of=~/Downloads/linux-iso-file.iso status=progress

The flashing process will take some time. You’ll know the process is complete when the numbers in the terminal are no longer updating, and you can type in it again with the keyboard. When the terminal is useable again, you’ll have created a bootable Linux USB in the terminal with dd!

4. ROSA ImageWriter

ROSA ImageWriter is a super useful GUI tool that you can use to create a bootable Linux USB if you’re in a hurry. To start the process, open up a terminal window and download the latest version of the app.

wget http://wiki.rosalab.ru/en/images/7/7f/RosaImageWriter-2.6.2-lin-x86_64.tar.xz

When the app is finished downloading, extract it, and start it up with the three commands below.

tar xvf RosaImageWriter-2.6.2-lin-x86_64.tar.xz

cd ~/RosaImageWriter

sudo ./RosaImageWriter

With the ROSA ImageWriter application open on your Linux desktop, go ahead and download the ISO file of the Linux OS you plan to create a bootable USB with. Then, click on the button next to “Image” to select the ISO file.

Go to “USB Device” and select your USB flash drive (if ROSA ImageWriter doesn’t do it automatically). Once both the ISO file and USB flash drive are selected, click on the “Write” button to start the creation process.

Creating a bootable USB with the ROSA ImageWriter will take time. When the process is complete, your bootable USB installer will be ready to use!

Conclusion

In this list, we covered 4 ways you can create a bootable USB installer on Linux. Each of the methods we demonstrated is great in their own way, but it is up to you to decide what one works best.

What is your favorite way to create a bootable USB installer on Linux? Sound off in the comment section below!

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