How to reset your Linux password with the Ubuntu live disk

Did you forget your password on your Linux PC? Can’t get back in? Don’t worry! You can use the Ubuntu live disk to reset your password! In this guide, we’ll show you how to do it!

Creating a live disk

Before we can use the Ubuntu live disk to reset your password, we need to create the live disk. To make the live disk, start by heading over to Ubuntu.com/desktop. Once on the desktop page, select the “Download Ubuntu” button.

Upon selecting the “Download Ubuntu” button, you will be taken to the download page, where you’ll see two choices available for download. Look for “Ubuntu 20.10,” and select the green download button next to it to start the download of the Ubuntu 20.10 ISO file.

When the ISO file is done downloading to your PC, head over to Etcher.io, and plug in your favorite USB flash drive into the USB port. Then, download the latest version of Etcher to the computer you are creating your Ubuntu live disk on.

Note: the great thing about Etcher is that it is cross-platform! Even if you’re locked out of your Linux PC, you can still create your Ubuntu live disk on a Mac, Windows PC, or other Linux systems!

After downloading the latest release of Etcher on your computer, launch it. Then, follow the step-by-step instructions below. 

Step 1: Locate the “Flash from file” button in the Etcher app, and select it with the mouse. Upon selecting this button, a pop-up window will appear. Use this window to browse for the Ubuntu 20.10 ISO file.

Step 2: Select the “Select target” button with the mouse. Then, use the menu to choose your USB flash drive.

Step 3: Select the “Flash!” button with the mouse to start the Ubuntu live disk creation process. It may take a couple of minutes to complete!

When the live disk is done flashing, reboot the PC you wish to reset the password of into its BIOS, and configure it to boot from USB to access the Ubuntu live disk.

Mounting Linux as a Chroot

The only way to change your password (if you are locked out) is with a Chroot. A Chroot allows the user to mount an operating system inside of a self-contained environment.

Accessing a Chroot isn’t easy if you’re new to Linux. You will need to understand a bit about file systems, including what is mounted were. However, we will break it down in as simple terms as we can!

To start, launch a terminal window in the live disk. Once the terminal window is open, transition the live disk to the root user using the sudo -s command.

sudo -s

After accessing the root user, run the lsblk command. This command will show every hard drive and partition connected to your Linux system. 

lsblk -paf

From here, you must look through the lsblk output for your Linux hard drive partitions. In this example, we will be using /dev/sda1 for the boot partition and /dev/sda2 the root partition. Yours may differ. 

Please read our in-depth tutorial on finding hard-drive information on Linux if you cannot figure out what partitions are. It will help you understand the lsblk output and help you find out what partitions are what.

Once you’ve figured out what partitions are, you can mount them to the /mnt directory in the Ubuntu live disk using the commands below.

Note: remember, /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 are merely examples. Please change the /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 portions of the command below to reflect the partitions you need to mount.

First, we mount the root filesystem to the /mnt directory. In this example, the root filesystem is on. /dev/sda2.

mount /dev/sd2 /mnt 

After mounting the root file system to /mnt on the Ubuntu live disk, we must mount /dev/sda1, the boot partition to /boot/efiIn this example, the Linux system we are working with has a dedicated EFI partition. 

If you do not have a dedicated EFI partition, skip this step. Alternatively, if your EFI mount path is different (for example, /boot instead of /boot/efi), be sure to change it in the command below.

Note: the path in the mount command must start with /mnt/ if you are to change it. 

mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi

Once all filesystems are mounted, mount the Chroot to your Ubuntu live disk using the following commands.

cd /mnt

mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev

mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts

mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc

mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys

chroot /mnt

With all the above commands entered, you will have mounted your Linux system in a Chroot and have full command-line access to it.

Reset password with live disk

Once you connect to the Chroot in the Ubuntu live disk, you will instantly have access to your Linux PC’s root user account. Since you have root access, you can easily change the user account’s password, which you forgot.

To change the password, execute the passwd command followed by the username. For example, to reset the password of the “derrik” user, you’d do:

passwd derrik

After entering the passwd command, the terminal prompt will ask you to set a new password. Do so. Then, reboot the computer, and the password will have been reset!

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5 ways to play SNES games on Linux

On Linux, there are many different ways to play Super Nintendo video games. However, if you’re new to the platform, you might not know about the many ways to enjoy SNES video games on Linux. That’s why we’ve made this list of 5 ways to play SNES games on Linux.

1. Snes9x

Snes9x is one of the best SNES emulators on the Linux platform. It is very well designed, with a thoughtful user interface and tons of excellent features, such as gameplay recording, controller support, and various graphical enhancements.

In the past, on AddictiveTips, we’ve gone over how to install Snes9x on the Linux platform. In the tutorial, we also go over how to configure a controller, save games, and much more!  To get going with the Snes9x app, click here.

2. Zsnes

Zsnes is another great emulator for the Linux platform. Unlike Snes9x, Zsnes doesn’t have a GTK-based GUI. Instead, it has a video game-style user interface that some users like, and some don’t.

To play SNES games with Zsnes on Linux, you will need to install the app first. To start the installation of Zsnes on Linux, open up a terminal window. Once the terminal window is open, follow the installation instructions below to get the Zsnes emulator set up.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install zsnes

Debian

sudo apt-get install zsnes

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S zsnes

Fedora

To get Zsnes on Fedora, you must first enable the RPM Fusion Free software repository. This repository contains free, open-source software not included by default in the Fedora repos. To set it up, click here

After setting up RPM Fusion Free on Fedora, you can install Zsnes with:

sudo dnf install zsnes

OpenSUSE

To get Zsnes on OpenSUSE, you will need to head over to the OpenSUSE Build Service and click on the “1 Click Install” button.

Now that Zsnes is set up on your Linux PC launch it by searching for “zsnes” in your app menu. Once the app is open, do the following to start playing SNES games.

First, press the spacebar to dismiss the one-time message that appears. After that, find the “Game” menu, and select it with the mouse. 

Inside of the “Game” menu, find the “Load” button and click on it. Then, use the file browser to select a SNES ROM. Upon selecting a ROM, it will load up, and you’ll be ready to play SNES games!

3. Snes9x EX

Coming in at the 3rd best SNES emulator on Linux is Snes9x EX. As an emulator, Snes9x EX is a lot like Snes9x, but instead of using the Higan SNES core, it uses the Imagine engine. It also has some other tweaks and changes that make it unique. 

To get going with Snes9x EX on your Linux PC, you will need to download it. Sadly, there aren’t any packaged binaries to download or install this app on the Linux desktop.

To download Snes9x EX to your Linux PC, open up a terminal. Once the terminal session is open, use the following wget command to download the ZIP archive of Snes9x EX.

wget https://archive.org/download/snes9x-ex-linux/snes9x-ex-linux.zip

After downloading the ZIP archive, you must unzip it using the Unzip utility in the terminal. Unzip will extract the contents of the ZIP archive, allowing you access to the emulator.

unzip snes9x-ex-linux.zip

With the emulator unzipped, use the CD command to move into the ‘Snes9x EX+’ directory.

cd 'Snes9x EX+'

You can then start up the app with: 

./s9xp

Once Snes9x EX is open on your Linux PC, you can start a game by doing the following. First, look for the “Load Game” button in the menu and click on it with the mouse.

By selecting “Load Game,” a file-browser will appear. Click on the arrow key in the upper left-hand corner to go up a level. Then, use the browser to load up a SNES ROM.

Once the SNES ROM is loaded up, you will be able to start playing SNES in Snes9x EX!

4. Retroarch

Retroarch is not a dedicated SNES emulator. However, it can emulate the Super Nintendo via downloadable libretro cores. As a result, it makes for a great way to enjoy SNES games on Linux.

To get started with playing SNES games with it, you will need to install the Retroarch app on your computer. Previously on AddictiveTips, we’ve gone over how to install Retroarch on Linux. To get the app set up on your Linux computer, search for “retroarch” in the terminal and install the program the way you typically install packages.

Once the Retroarch app is set up on your Linux system, launch it. Then, with the app open, do the following. First, select the “Online Updater” button in the menu. After selecting “Online Updater,” select “Core Downloader.”

In the “Content Downloader” page, look through for a Snes core to download to Retroarch and download it. Then, once the core is done downloading, right-click with the mouse till you get back to the main menu.

Inside of the main menu, find the “Import Content” button, and click on it. Then, select “Scan Directory” and use the file browser to add your SNES ROMS to Retroarch.

After adding your content, “Super Nintendo Entertainment System” will appear on the sidebar. Click on it, then select your ROM to start playing SNES with Retroarch!

5. Mednafen

If you want to enjoy Snes video games on Linux but don’t like GUI emulators, you should check out Mednafen. It’s a command-line multi-system emulator that can play SNES ROMs.

To play games with Mednafen, you must first install it. To install it on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window. Then, use the command-line installation instructions down below to get it working.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install mednafen

Debian

sudo apt-get install mednafen

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S mednafen

Fedora

sudo dnf install mednafen

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install mednafen

With the Mednafen emulator installed on your computer, do the following to play SNES games on your Linux PC. 

First, use the CD command to move into the directory where your SNES ROM files are. In this example, the ROM files are in ~/roms. Yours will differ, so be sure to modify the command below.

cd ~/roms

Once in the ROM directory, you can start up the emulation with:

mednafen my-snes-rom-file

As soon as the emulation starts up, you will be able to play SNES games on Linux with Mednafen!

Conclusion

In this list, we went over the 5 ways you can play Super Nintendo games on Linux. What is your favorite Super Nintendo game to emulate on Linux? Tell us in the comment section below!

The post 5 ways to play SNES games on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to bind keyboard controls to controller on Linux

Controller support for Linux games is excellent, thanks to Steam and the Linux kernel. However, not every video game available on the Linux platform brings controller support. Some games require a keyboard and mouse, and that’s a bummer if you prefer a gamepad.

Introducing AntiMicroX, a simple program that allows you to bind any keyboard/mouse control to a gamepad button. Here’s how to use it.

Installing AntiMicroX on Linux

There are quite a few ways to install the AntiMicroX application on Linux. Currently, the app is supported on Ubuntu and Debian via a downloadable DEB package, Arch Linux via the AUR, and Flatpak and AppImage. In this section of the guide, we will focus on all installation methods.

To start the installation of AntiMicroX on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window. Once the terminal window is open on your Linux PC and ready to use, follow the command-line installation instructions outlined below that corresponds with the Linux distribution you currently use.

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, the AntiMicroX app is installable via a downloadable DEB package. To get your hands on the latest DEB, open up a terminal window and use the following wget downloader command below.

wget https://github.com/AntiMicroX/antimicrox/releases/download/3.1.3/antimicrox-3.1.3-amd64.deb -O ~/Downloads/antimicrox-3.1.3-amd64.deb

Once the downloading process is complete, use the CD command to move the terminal session into the “Downloads” directory, where the DEB package was saved to.

cd ~/Downloads

Finally, install AntiMicroX on your Ubuntu Linux PC using the Apt command below.

sudo apt install ./antimicrox-3.1.3-amd64.deb

Debian

As there is a DEB package available, AntiMicroX will work on Debian. To get the app set up, you must download the latest version of the package using the wget command.

wget https://github.com/AntiMicroX/antimicrox/releases/download/3.1.3/antimicrox-3.1.3-amd64.deb -O ~/Downloads/antimicrox-3.1.3-amd64.deb

The download will take a couple of seconds to complete. When it does, use the CD command to move your terminal session into the “Downloads” directory to begin the installation.

cd ~/Downloads

Once inside the “Downloads” directory, the installation can begin. Using the dpkg, get the latest version of AntiMicroX working on Debian.

sudo dpkg -i antimicrox-3.1.3-amd64.deb

During the installation of the AntiMicroX DEB package, some errors may have occurred. To fix this, execute the command below.

sudo apt-get install -f

Arch Linux

AntiMicroX is available on Arch Linux via the AUR. To start the installation of the app on your system, get the Trizen AUR helper working. Trizen makes building AUR apps much more comfortable.

sudo pacman -S git base-devel 

git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/trizen.git 

cd trizen 

makepkg -sri

With the Trizen AUR helper taken care of, AntiMicroX is ready to be installed on your Linux PC. Using the trizen -S command below, get the app working.

trizen -S antimicrox

Flatpak

AntiMicroX is in the Flathub app store as a Flatpak. To get it working, start by enabling the Flatpak runtime. To set up the runtime, follow this guide on the subject.

After setting up the Flatpak runtime on your system, you will be able to install AntiMicroX on your Linux PC with the two commands below.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo 

flatpak install flathub io.github.antimicrox.antimicrox

AppImage

AntiMicroX is available as an AppImage. To get it working, create a new “AppImages” folder, download it with wget, and start it with the execution command.

mkdir -p ~/AppImages/

cd ~/AppImages/

wget https://github.com/AntiMicroX/antimicrox/releases/download/3.1.3/AntiMicroX-x86_64.AppImage

chmod +x AntiMicroX-x86_64.AppImage

./AntiMicroX-x86_64.AppImage

Bind keyboard controls to controller with AntiMicroX

To use AntiMicroX to bind controls, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: Open up AntiMicroX on your Linux PC by searching for it in the app menu. Once the app is open, plug in your gaming controller and allow the app to detect it.

Step 2: When AntiMicroX detects your controller, you will see every button on your detected gaming controller shown. These buttons say, “[NO KEY]” to show that no keys are assigned yet.

To assign a key, look through the list of mappable buttons in AntiMicroX, and click on one. Once you click on an unmapped button, a keyboard diagram will appear.

Select one of the keys on the keyboard to map it to the button. Or, if you’d like to map a mouse movement/button to the controller, select the “Mouse” tab, and choose one of those options.

Step 3: Once all of the keys are bound in AntiMicroX, find the “Save As” button, and select it. Selecting this button will allow you to save your configuration to a file that can be accessed later. 

With all keys bound, you’ll be able to play your keyboard/mouse video game on Linux with the comfort of a controller. Enjoy!

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How to try out the new Vivaldi email client on Linux

The Vivaldi web browser has a new feature: a built-in email client. With it, users can read their email directly through their web browser without needing to deal with webmail.

In this guide, we’ll go over how to try out the new Vivaldi built-in email client. 

Install the Vivaldi snapshot build

The new Vivaldi email client is available to Linux users currently through the pre-Beta snapshots. This means that if you now have Vivaldi’s latest stable release on Linux, it likely doesn’t have access to the client yet.

However, it is straightforward to switch over to the snapshot build that allows you access to the new built-in email client. In this section of the guide, we’ll show you how to get it working.

To start the installation of the latest Vivaldi Snapshot, uninstall the current stable release of the browser. Once that’s uninstalled, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop and enter the commands below to install the snapshot that has support for the mail client.

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, you can download the snapshot DEB package from the November 24th, 2020 blog post that announced the new mail feature. To get the DEB package, click on this link, scroll down to “Download (2115.4),” and click on “DEB 64-bit” to grab the file.

Once you’ve downloaded the Vivaldi DEB package to your Linux PC, use the CD command to move into the “Download” directory where the Vivaldi snapshot DEB package is located.

cd ~/Downloads

Finally, install the snapshot on your Linux PC using the Apt command.

sudo apt install ./vivaldi-snapshot_3.5.2115.4-1_amd64.deb

Debian

Debian has support for the new Vivaldi snapshot since the blog post links to a DEB package. To get it, head over to the November 24th, 2020 post, scroll down to the “Download (2115.4)” section and click on “DEB 64-bit” to grab the file.

After downloading the DEB package to your computer, use the terminal window to CD into the “Downloads” directory. Then, execute the dpkg command to install the latest Vivaldi browser snapshot.

sudo dpkg -i vivaldi-snapshot_3.5.2115.4-1_amd64.deb

Keep in mind that during the dpkg installation process, errors may appear. These errors are dependency issues and can easily be fixed by running the apt-get install -f command in a terminal.

Arch Linux

Officially, Arch Linux doesn’t support the new snapshot via the blog, but there is an AUR package that downloads it and installs it, so you can still get it working. To start the installation process, install the Trizen AUR helper. 

sudo pacman -S git base-devel

git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/trizen.git

cd trizen

makepkg -sri

After getting the Trizen AUR helper working on your Linux system, you can quickly use it to get the latest Vivaldi browser snapshot on your system.

trizen -S trizen -S vivaldi-snapshot

Fedora

As noted in the latest blog post, the Vivaldi snapshot supports Fedora Linux announcing the new email client feature. To get the snapshot set up on your Fedora system, head over to the blog post, scroll down to “Download (2115.4),” and select “RPM 64-bit” to grab the latest RPM package file.

Once the RPM package file is done downloading, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory.

cd ~/Downloads

Install the latest snapshot on Fedora with dnf.

sudo dnf install vivaldi-snapshot-3.5.2115.4-1.x86_64.rpm

OpenSUSE

Like Fedora, OpenSUSE has support for the latest Vivaldi snapshot, as there is a link to an RPM package file in the newest blog post. Head over to the newest snapshot post, scroll down to “Download (2115.4),” and select “RPM 64-bit” to download it.

When the download is complete, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory. Then, execute zypper to install the package.

cd ~/Downloads

sudo zypper install vivaldi-snapshot-3.5.2115.4-1.x86_64.rpm

Setting up email in Vivaldi

The experimental Vivaldi email client is enabled through the vivaldi://experiments area. Open up a new tab in the Vivaldi browser and paste the following URL in the address bar.

vivaldi://experiments

After placing the URL in the URL bar, press the Enter key on the keyboard to go to the experiments page. Once on the experiments page, you will see a few disabled features that you can turn on.

To turn on the Vivaldi email client, locate the checkbox next to “Calendar, Mail & Feeds.” Then, restart the browser by closing all of the windows, and re-open it. 

Once the Vivaldi web browser is re-open, you will now see an email icon on the left-hand sidebar. Click on it to open it. 

When you click on the mail icon, a window will appear that says “Add your first mail account,” followed by a button called “Add Mail Account.” Click on the “Add Mail Account” button to set up your email account in the Vivaldi email client.

The post How to try out the new Vivaldi email client on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

8 best casual Linux computer games

Are you in the mood for some casual computer games on your Linux PC like Solitare or Chess, or Sudoku? Don’t know the first thing about installing these types of video games on your Linux PC? If so, follow along as we go over the 8 best casual Linux computer games!

1. Quadrapassel

Quadrapassel is an open-source game inspired by the popular video game known as Tetris. Much like Tetris, in Quadrapassel, your task is to place falling block pieces to complete a horizontal row quickly. If you mess up your block placement, the game ends.

Quadrapassel is an excellent computer game and plays almost exactly like Tetris does, with the added benefit of being open-source and compatible with Linux. If you love Tetris, you’ll love Quadrapassel!

Install Quadrapassel

The GNOME project develops Quadrapassel, and as a result, you can get it on nearly every Linux operating system that also has the Gnome Shell desktop environment. 

If you’d like to play Quadrapassel on your Linux PC, you can install it through the Flathub app store as a Flatpak. To get started, ensure you have the Flatpak runtime installed. Then, enter the commands below to get the game working.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub org.gnome.Quadrapassel

2. Bovo

Bovo is a “five in a row” type game. The game is 2-player (player versus computer) and the object of the game is to get 5 Xs or Os in a row on the pictogram to win. Bovo supports multiple modes of difficulty and is very easy to pick up and play for quick fun.

Install Bovo

The Bovo computer game is part of the “KDE Extra” line of packages for Linux. As a result, the game is straightforward to install on any Linux operating system that supports the KDE Desktop Environment.

If you’d like to try out Bovo on your Linux PC, enter the commands below in a terminal window.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install bovo

Debian

sudo apt-get install bovo

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S bovo

Fedora

sudo dnf install bovo

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install bovo

3. Aisleriot Solitaire

Aisleriot Solitaire is a card game application for the Linux platform, courtesy of the GNOME project. With it, users can play over 80 different solitaire-type card games using their mouse and keyboard. If you love playing cards on your computer, Aisleriot Solitaire is worth your time.

Install Aisleriot Solitare

As stated previously, Aisleriot Solitaire is developed by GNOME. So, you’ll have no issue getting this computer game up and running on your Linux PC. To install it, ensure you have the Flatpak runtime set up. Then, enter the commands below to get it working.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub org.gnome.Aisleriot

4. Five or More

Five or More is a computer game in which users must align five or more objects of the same color into a line on the game board, causing them to disappear and thus score points. The game is won once the player removes all colored balls on the board.

Install Five or More

Five or More is available for installation on all Linux platforms in many ways. That said, the best way to get it working on nearly any Linux operating system is with Flatpak. To install it, ensure you have the runtime set up. Then, enter the commands below.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub org.gnome.five-or-more

5. Backgammony

Backgammony is a free backgammon game for Linux. Users can play the game of backgammon with a computer AI or another user over the internet or local area network. Backgammony makes use of GNU Backgammon to provide a challenging AI to play against.

Install Backgammony

Backgammony is available on Flathub as a Flatpak package. To get the game installed on your Linux PC so you can play it, make sure the Flatpak runtime is installed. Then, enter the commands below in a terminal.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub uk.jnthn.backgammony

6. KBreakOut

KBreakOut is a “Breakout” clone by the KDE team. It’s great fun. The game’s object in KBreakOut is to hit the bouncing ball with the brick at the bottom of the board (using your mouse) at the bricks at the top of the screen. If you destroy all the bricks, you advance to the next level, and if you drop the ball, you lose.

Install KBreakOut

The KDE project developed KBreakOut. As a result, it is available on any Linux OS supporting the KDE desktop environment. To install it on your system, open up a terminal window, and enter the commands below.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install kbreakout

Debian

sudo apt-get install kbreakout 

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S kbreakout

Fedora

Sadly, KBreakOut is unavailable for Fedora Linux.

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install kbreakout

7. GNOME Mines

GNOME Mines is the Gnome project’s take on the classic Windows computer game Minesweeper. Much like the Windows game, GNOME Mines tasks the player with sweeping a board for active mines, avoiding mistakes to stay alive.

Install GNOME Mines

Do you want to play GNOME Mines on your Linux PC? Here’s how to get it set up. First, make sure you have the Flatpak runtime set up on your computer. After that, enter the two commands below to get the game running!

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub org.gnome.Mines

8. Xboard

Xboard is a graphical chess game for the Linux platform. It’s laid out in 2D and supports both player/computer as well as person/person games over the network. Xboard is unique for its wide variety of chess options, like move history, player statistics, and much more. Suffice it to say; if you’re a chess lover, you’ll love Xboard!

Install Xboard

If you’d like to play Xboard on your Linux system, you can install it through the terminal using the commands below. 

Ubuntu

sudo apt install xboard

Debian

sudo apt-get install xboard

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S xboard

Fedora

sudo dnf install xboard

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install xboard

Conclusion

In this list, we talked about 8 excellent casual computer games for Linux. We also showed you how to install them so you can have some fun. What is your favorite Linux computer game on the list? Tell us in the comment section below!

The post 8 best casual Linux computer games appeared first on AddictiveTips.