Will Your Driving Record Affects Your Life Insurance Rates?

Insurance companies consider all sorts of things when deciding what level their rates should be. Life insurance policies take a particularly broad view and consider all sorts of things. But is your driving record one of them? In this article, we will answer that question and also explain how you can see your driving record and improve it to try and get your insurance rates down.

Driving Record Affects Your Life Insurance Rates

If you have been giving a higher quote for your life insurance premiums than you were expecting, you may well be scratching your heads trying to figure out why.

Life insurance companies weigh up all sorts of different things when deciding whether to insure you and how much to charge. People expect them to look at things like your age and your health records. But their research goes much further afield than that.

One thing you might not consider is that your driving record could have affected your life insurance quote. In this article, we will explain why that can be the case. We will also tell you how you can find out the state of your driving record and give a few tips on what you can do to try and keep life insurance rates as low as possible.

Understanding your driving record?

If you drive a vehicle legally in the USA, then you have a driving record. It is held by your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and is a file that logs everything about your driving record and history.

It includes such things as when and where you passed your test, details of any vehicles you have registered in your name, and also information about any major or minor traffic offenses you have incurred.

Your driving record is a public document. This means that anyone is entitled to see it and the information is kept in the public domain. Not many individuals will be randomly browsing through your driving records, but there are quite a few companies that do have an interest and one of the keenest are insurance companies.

What information is held on my driving record?

A lot of people have never looked at their driving record or didn’t even know it existed. When they find out, they are often quite surprised by how much information it contains.

Your driving record will include things like:

  • Personal details – this will include things like your full name, address, date of birth, and gender.
  • Driving license details – Information such as your driver’s license number, driver’s license class, and any legal restrictions placed on your license.
  • Conviction details – Detailed information about any driving convictions you have. These will include everything from minor offenses like parking and speeding tickets up to major accidents and serious offenses such as DUIs.
  • Driving license points – Your record will also include the number of points on your license.

As we will explain below, this is crucial data for a number of different insurance companies. Auto insurance providers will use your driving record as the basis of their decision on whether to insure you and how much to charge.

But it also includes a great deal of useful data for life insurance companies to consider too. We will explain more about what they are looking for and why below.

How to find out what your driving record looks like

If you have no idea what state your driving record is in or are wondering if some minor offenses from your past are still showing up, the best thing to do is to take a look. After all, your driving record is a public document and you have the right to view it just like everyone else.

There are three possible ways to find out what your driving record looks like:

  1. Request a copy of your drivers record from your DMV

The first option is to request a copy of your driving record from your State’s DMV.

Some State DMV’s let people access an unofficial copy of their driving record online. If you need an official copy with all the latest information added, you will have to make a formal request. Most DMVs will charge you a fee of around $10. Be aware that prices can vary from state to state.

Requests for official copies of a driving record are not usually a DMV’s number one priority so it can take quite a while for them to be processed. If you need to access your driving record quickly, you will need to choose a different method.

  1. Request a copy of your driver record from your insurance agent

If an insurance company has requested a copy of your driving record for the purposes of reviewing your rates, it may be willing to provide you with a copy of what they receive. Some will even let you have a copy for free.

Be aware that this is down to the discretion of individual companies and agents so don’t be offended if your company refuses to help.

There is also a notable downside to getting a copy of your driver record in this way. If you want to use it to persuade your insurance company to lower your rates, you may need to get your DMV to make changes to it.

But if the insurance company has already seen your driving record as it is, they may be reluctant to accept any changes and lowering your rates can be much harder.

  1. Run a background check on yourself

The third option is to use a third-party background check to see a copy of your driving record.

A Background checking site is an online tool that searches through multiple public data sources to compile reports which pull together all this information and create a profile of any US citizen.

If you run a background check on yourself, you will be able to see all the information about yourself in the public domain. This includes the latest version of your driving record and will show details of any driving license points or other recent driving incidents you have been involved in.

The information is present in an easy-to-read report and most decent sites can run a search and generate a report in just a few minutes.

You can then use this information to fix your driving record and attempt to bring down any insurance rates you think have been set too high.

Best background checking site to check your driving records

Running a background check is probably the fastest and most reliable way to see what your driving record looks like. But there are a lot of background checking sites on the market and they all make claims to be the best site around. Choosing the right one can be tough.

That is why we have been testing all the top background checking sites to see which is best at digging out up-to-date and accurate driving record data. As a result of these exhaustive tests, we have identified three sites that stand head and shoulders above the rest. They are:

1. BeenVerified

BeenVerified - Editors choice

BeenVerified is our number one recommendation for getting fast and accurate driving record data. In our tests, BeenVerified never failed to find accurate and up-to-date driving record information. It processed searches impressively fast and was able to find the right details even if we fed in misleading information.

BeenVerified presents the data it finds in well designed and easy-to-read reports that enable you to identify all the relevant information quickly and easily. It also has a user-friendly desktop dashboard and some excellent apps that are available for iOS and Android devices. These make managing your searches straightforward. If you encounter any problems, the BeenVerified customer support team is on hand to assist you. We found them to be consistently helpful and responsive.

A basic BeenVerified subscription costs just $26.89 per month or you can pay $17.48 per month for a three-month package. We recommend choosing to pay an additional $9.95 for their premium deal too as this guarantees every possible driving record will be unearthed. For the quality of service and the accuracy of results, BeenVerified offers exceptional value for money and fully deserves our number one spot.

BEST BACKGROUND CHECKS: BeenVerified provides a comprehensive look into your public record at an outstanding price. Get it for less with our exclusive reader discount.

2. Instant CheckMate

Instant Checkmate - Editors choice

Instant CheckMate is a background checking site that specializes in speed. If you need to find out about your driving records quickly and want to be sure of accurate data, they are the site for you. In our tests, Instant CheckMate generated comprehensive and detailed driving record data faster than any other site with a degree of accuracy that surpassed our expectations.

Speed is not the only selling point either. Instant Checkmate has good mobile apps for iOS and Android devices and a user-friendly desktop dashboard which means it is a really simple service to use. When their searches are complete, they also produce readable and user-friendly reports that allow you to find relevant details fast.

Instant Checkmate costs $34.78 a month or $27.82 a month if you opt for a three-month subscription. At these rates, Instant CheckMate is not the cheapest site on the market. But if speed is your priority and you don’t want to compromise on quality, Instant CheckMate could be the best site for you.

3. TruthFinder

TruthFinder - Editors choice

TruthFinder is able to generate unerringly accurate driving record data with every search and its algorithms are so impressive, they can even cut through inaccurate or misleading information to find the right details every time. We tested TruthFinder numerous times and not once did it fail to produce driving record data that was both correct and complete.

Truthfinder does not offer the most consistent speeds but accuracy is its USP and this is also in evidence in the final reports it produces. These are detailed and well-designed as are the desktop dashboard and mobile apps used to manage searches.

Another USP is the TruthFinder customer support service. This can be accessed around the clock and is also available on a toll-free number, something no other site we tested can offer.

Subscription prices for Truthfinder are reasonable and we came away from using their tool with a sense that everything was done with the user’s needs to the fore. This is certainly not the case with every site and if is either accuracy or user-friendliness is your priority, you won’t go far wrong with TruthFinder.

EXCLUSIVE DEAL: Looking for deep insight into your own public record? Try TruthFinder, one of the industry titans. Get the service with our generous reader discount.

How do life insurance companies consider your driving record?

When a life insurance company is considering your policy, or whether to offer you a policy, they will consider all sorts of different information from a whole range of sources.

They need to consider things like your health record, your age, your family’s health history, and anything that could have an impact on either your health or the length of your life.

Driving is a highly dangerous activity. In 2018, the last year for which data is available, there were 36,560 deaths in RTA’s in the USA. As a result, driving is a factor that life insurance companies take extremely seriously.

If you can be seen to have a track record of being an unsafe driver, they will conclude there is a higher chance of you being killed in an RTA. This means they will want to increase your life insurance rates as a result.

Your driving record is the easiest way for them to get a clear view of the type of driver you are and assess what level of risk there is to them from offering you life insurance.

Every insurance company uses different criteria, but in general terms the more infractions and driving license points you have on your driving record, the higher you can expect your life insurance rates to be.

How can I keep my life insurance rates down?

While life insurance companies can and will access your entire driving record, the good news is that most of them will only consider the most recent parts of your record. This means that if you have some minor infractions from your youth on the record, these are unlikely to affect your rates.

This is not always true for more serious offenses. If you have a DUI on your record, this is likely to still be taken into account no matter how long ago it was.

The good news is that there are ways to improve your driver record. To do this, you will need to see a full copy of the information first so use one of the methods above to get a copy of the latest version of your records. Once you have done this, there are few options open to you:

  • Challenge any inaccurate records – mistakes do happen on driving records. If you see any tickets or points you don’t recognize, challenge them with your DMV. If they are wrong, you can get them removed.
  • Expunge violations from your record – It is possible to expunge some driving violations from your driving record. Rules on this vary depending on which state you are in and it generally only applies to some minor offenses that occurred a long time ago. But it is worth looking into the rules where you are if you think you could clear up your record.
  • Settle minor claims yourself – Insurance companies always consider how many claims you have made when setting your rates. If you are involved in a minor accident and can afford to pay for any damage yourself, doing so will always help to keep your other insurance rates low.
  • Take a driving safety course – If you have been in accidents recently, taking a driving safety course demonstrates to insurance companies that you are serious about becoming a safer driver and should pose them less of a risk.
  • Wait – If your driving record has things on it that occurred a few years ago but will still be looked at by a life insurance company, you could always wait until these incidents are no longer likely to be considered and then apply for life insurance.

Summary

The short answer to the question in the title of this article is that yes, your driving record can affect your life insurance rates. But this doesn’t have to be all bad news.

While life insurance companies will definitely look at your driver record, they will not look at everything. There are also various ways you can improve your record so it doesn’t adversely affect your rates.

In this guide, we have explained what these are also offered some advice on how you can see what your driving record looks like, including recommended the best background checking sites to use.

Have you found your life insurance rates have been affected by your driving record? Did you manage to do anything about it? Have you managed to improve your driving record to make all your insurance rates better? Do you have any other tips for our readers on how to do this? First-hand advice and experiences are always useful for our readers, so please do share yours with us using the comment box below.

The post Will Your Driving Record Affects Your Life Insurance Rates? appeared first on AddictiveTips.

Drug Test Warning: Products Like Cannabidiol Can Result in Failed Drug Screenings

If you have to take a drug test as part of a recruitment process you want to be certain of passing. But there are some legal products that can cause you to fail a drug test and put your job application in jeopardy. In this guide, we will explain what those products are, how they can trigger a drug test, how this relates to your wider background check, and what you can do about it.

More and more jobs these days require applicants to pass a drug test before being hired. For most of you, this should be a formality as you have either never taken illegal narcotics before or it was so long ago that any effects will have long since left your system.

But there are some products that can affect the results of an employment drug test even if use them is perfectly legal.

If you use one of these products, that can be a big problem, especially if you have anything related to drug-taking on your background check. There are already examples of people who have lost out on jobs having failed their drug tests as a result of taking legal supplements.

In this guide, we will explain a little more about how some products can trigger a drug test fail, how this relates to your wider background history, and what you can do about it.

What are employment drug tests

Employment drug tests are an increasingly common part of many employment processes. Any job can request a job applicant to take a drug test but it tends to be those that require people to drive, operate heavy machinery, or undertake other complex manual tasks that do so the most.

The reasons for these tests are simple. Employers don’t want staff on their books who are likely to be users of either illegal or prescription narcotics. The use of opioids and other narcotics is a growing problem across the USA which is why the use of drug testing is on the rise.

There are a number of different reasons why an employer might request to run a drug test:

  • Pre-employment tests – to check that job applicants do not have any trace of narcotics in their systems.
  • Random/regular drug tests – Some jobs require staff to submit to either a random drug-testing process or regular drug tests on an annual or bi-annual basis.
  • Post-accident tests – If you are involved in an accident at work, employers might ask you to take a drug test to rule out the involvement of narcotic use in the incident.
  • Safety-related tests – If your job has the potential to put other people’s lives or safety at risk, employers might ask you to submit to drug tests on either a regular or ad-hoc basis.

How many people test positive?

In 2019, Quast Diagnostics, one of the four main companies that run employment drug tests in the US, published its analysis of more than 9 million drug tests taken during 2018. It found that around 4.4% of the samples tested proved positive. However, the number of tests that came back positive for opioids was just 0.31%.

The biggest single cause of a positive drug test was THC (the active ingredient in marijuana). 2.8% of all tests showed traces of THC in a person’s system.

The number of positive drug tests taken after an accident in the workplace also showed an increase in positive results. 8.4% of these tests came back positive according to this study.

How do employment drug tests work?

The majority of employment drug tests are done using a urine sample. Applicants or staff will be given a small vessel and asked to fill it with urine, seal it, and return it. This will often have to be done in controlled conditions to avoid cheating.

In a small number of cases, employers may also request samples of blood, saliva, sweat, or hair. This is usually only the case for particularly sensitive jobs such as an airline pilot.

This sample will then be tested for specific substances in a lab. Most employment tests will only test for things like opioids, TCH, alcohol, and certain addictive prescription drugs. Certain sensitive jobs might also opt to test for a wider range of substances too.

Can other substances trigger employment drug tests?

There is a mounting body of evidence to suggest that there are some other legal substances that can still trigger an employment drug test.

The main cause of such false positives appears to be cannabis-related products such as Cannabidiol.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is the main ingredient in CBD oil, a natural remedy that has become increasingly popular in recent years. Like marijuana, CBD is derived from cannabis. It is one of 104 chemical compounds found in the plant along with THC. But unlike THC, CBD contains no psychoactive properties and both CBD and CBD oil are completely legal in the USA.

CBD oil offers some of the benefits of medical marijuana such as pain relief and anxiety reduction. But while CBD oil and THC are completely different, it appears that THC can sometimes appear in small traces in CBD oil. This trace presence is not something users would notice but it can be enough to result in a failed drug test.

Atlanta-based TV station WSB-TV reported a couple of years ago on the case of a woman who failed an employment drug test and missed out on a job because she was taking CBD oil. As a result of that report, pharmacists in the Atlanta region took to warning customers of the potential risk. Since then, there have been several other similar cases across the country.

Some CBD oil manufacturers have disputed these claims and there are CBD oil products out there that claim to be 100% THC free. The trouble is, these products tend to be less effective than the ones that do contain very small traces.

As a result, patients who use CBD oil or other CBD-related products should be aware that using it can make it harder for you to pass an employment drug test.

When false positives can cause big problems

If you do fail a drug test as a result of using CBD oil or for other innocent reasons, it will sometimes be possible to persuade your prospective employer that there is a valid reason for the result. But this can be a lot harder if your criminal background check shows up other drug-related issues in your past.

If a job is going to the effort of running a drug test on you, you can be almost certain that they will also be running a criminal records check too.

If your criminal record contains issues related to drug-taking, such as convictions for possession, dealing, or things like DUI, it can be a lot harder to convince people that your test result isn’t evidence of using illegal substances.

These criminal background checks are always extremely thorough and will look at everything on your file at federal, state, and county levels. There are only a few circumstances where a previous drug conviction might now show up on your check:

  • The seven-year rule – Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), employers are not allowed to consider criminal convictions from more than seven years ago, so these shouldn’t show up on a background check. In some states, the time limit is even shorter, so it is worth checking local laws.
  • Your record has been sealed – for some misdemeanors and even lesser felonies, it is possible to get your criminal record sealed. This means that the court agrees to remove it from the public record and it will only be opened if you re-offend.
  • Your record has been expunged – if you meet certain criteria, a court may even agree to expunge your record. This means the offense is permanently wiped from your file and shouldn’t show up on any background check.

If you are not sure whether an old drug offense will still appear on your record, the best advice is to run a background check on yourself.

Employers will use a professional background checking service that complies with all the relevant legislation, including the FCRA. But there are also public background checking sites that are open for everyone to use. These are not restricted by any regulations and so will show up everything that is held in the public domain meaning you should know exactly what shows up on your record.

Choosing the best public background checking site

Running a background check on yourself is easy. The toughest part is choosing the right site to use. There are dozens of different public background checking sites and each claims to be the best around. But the truth is that some are much better than others.

Our researchers have been testing all the top background checking sites to see which are best at digging out accurate criminal records data. The results are now in and we can confidently recommend the top three background checking sites on the market right now. They are:

1. BeenVerified

BeenVerified - Editors choice

BeenVerified is our number one recommendation. It can search publicly available criminal records from federal, state, and county courts and combine with a whole host of other data sources to paint a compelling portrait of a subject. BeenVerified has an impressive report of generating accurate results and copes well with any misleading information you might feed it.

Using BeenVerified to run a background check on yourself is easy. Start by choosing a subscription plan which will give you unlimited reports, unlimited phone and e-mail lookups, and access to fast and accurate information. You can manage all your information on either a desktop dashboard or their excellent mobile apps for iOS and Android devices. The final reports generated are comprehensive and easy-to-read too.

For the most detailed results, we would recommend signing up for their premium package for an extra $9.95 per month. This is on top of the basic subscription price of $26.89 per month or you can pay $17.48 per month for a three-month subscription. This might sound a little bit steep but for quality of service, BeenVerified represents excellent value for money.

BEST BACKGROUND CHECKS: BeenVerified provides a comprehensive look into your public record at an outstanding price. Get it for less with our exclusive reader discount.

2. Instant CheckMate

Instant Checkmate - Editors choice

Instant CheckMate is a super-fast and reliable background checking site that allows you to run online background checks with just a few clicks. Its big selling point is speed and our tests found that it delivered results faster than any other site we tested. There was no compromise on accuracy either. Instant Checkmate was able to generate detailed and accurate criminal records reports every time.

Using Instant CheckMate to run a criminal background check is easy. Just sign up, enter a name and locationor other basic information and then sit back. You won’t have to wait more than a few moments and with unlimited searches, you can research as many people as you like.

Prices start at $34.78 per month but choose a three-month subscription you can pay as little as $27.82 per month. This is a bit higher than some rival sites but if speed is your priority, Instant CheckMate is well worth the money.

3. TruthFinder

TruthFinder - Editors choice

TruthFinder offers deep and detailed background checks and criminal history reports with a highly impressive accuracy rate. TruthFinder can find everything from sex offender registries to driving records, arrest data, contact information, financial history, educational background, and employment records. Even if you enter false or misleading information it still has a knack of turning out the right results. In our tests, it never put a foot wrong.

A one-month subscription starts from just $27.78 or you can opt to pay $23.02 for two months. The basic package offers a full criminal record check which should return information including sex offender registers anddriving records.

If you pay a little more for their premium package, you will get every record there is including hard-copy records from county courts. Managing your searches is easy and prices are extremely competitive. With a great customer support service thrown in too, TruthFinder another truly impressive site.

EXCLUSIVE DEAL: Looking for deep insight into your own public record? Try TruthFinder, one of the industry titans. Get the service with our generous reader discount.

How long will TCH and other drugs stay in your system?

If you think you might have TCH or another substance in your system that might result in you failing a drug test, you are probably wondering how long you will have to wait until the substance leaves your system.

There is no set answer to this and there are a number of different factors that can affect the length of time it takes a drug to leave your system. This includes things like:

  • a drug’s half-life
  • Your state of hydration and fluid balance
  • How often you have used the drug
  • How you took it
  • How the specific test is run

For a urine test, the approximate times it takes a substance to leave your system is as follows:

  • Amphetamine – up to 2 days
  • Barbiturates – Up to 2 days for short-acting or 3 weeks for long-acting.
  • Benzodiazepines – Up to three days for casual use or 6 weeks for chronic use
  • Cocaine – Up to 4 days
  • Codeine – Up to 2 days
  • Ethyl Alcohol – Up to 12 hours
  • Heroin – Up to 2 days
  • Marijuana (THC) – Up to 7 days for single use of 2 months for sustained use
  • Methadone – Up to 3 days
  • Methamphetamine – Up to 2 days
  • MDMA – Up to 2 days
  • Morphine – Up to 2 days

Please do note that these times are a general guideline and not a guarantee that a test taken after this timeframe will not show up these substances.

Summary

Many employers these days ask staff and applicants to take a drug test and it has been found that legal substances like cannabidiol can trigger these tests.

In this guide, we have explained why and also given some advice on how these tests work. In particular, we have noted how a drug test results can seem worse if you have other drug-related offenses on your record.

If you aren’t sure if you have drug records on your file, we have advised you to use a background checking site to look and recommended the best ones around right now. We have also given you some general guidance on how long drugs can stay in your system.

Have you ever failed a drug test when you thought you were clean? Do you use cannabidiol or other cannabis-related products that you think may have triggered it? How did you handle the situation? We always welcome the experiences and views of our readers, so please do share yours with us using the comment box below.

The post Drug Test Warning: Products Like Cannabidiol Can Result in Failed Drug Screenings appeared first on AddictiveTips.

Do Warrants Show Up on a Background Check?

There are various different types of warrant under US law and the question of whether they will show up on a background check is dependent on a number of different factors. In this guide, we will explain what the different types of warrant are the type of searches they will show up on. We will also answer the question of whether an employer is likely to consider a warrant on your file sufficient to exclude you from a job and show you how you can check your own record to see if any outstanding warrants can be seen.

Under US law, there are several different types of warrant. These include arrest warrants, bench warrants, and civil warrants. Each of these warrants means different things and the question of whether it will show up on a background check is a complicated one.

Different background checks will look at different data sources. While a warrant is not technically speaking part of your criminal record, there are still other ways that it can show up.

In this article, we will explain the different types of warrants and the different circumstances in which they might and might not show up on your background check. We will also show you the best way to check your own records to see if a background check appears and if it does, explain what you can do about it.

What is a warrant?

Warrants are legal documents requesting the detention of a person in relation to either a criminal offense or another legal matter. There are a number of different warrants that can be issued under US law. They are:

  • Arrest warrant – Sometimes referred to as criminal warrants, an arrest warrant is issued against you are suspected of having committed a criminal offense. Arrest warrants are issued by law enforcement agencies and are usually based on evidence that you have committed a crime.
  • Bench warrant – A bench warrant is issued by a court. They are usually only issued if you have failed to appear before either a criminal or civil court when required to do so and are authorized by the sitting Judge. They request to police to immediately arrest the person in question and bring them before the court.
  • Civil warrant – Civil warrants are issued if you have failed to comply with court-ordered instructions. A typical example of this is if a court orders you to pay child support to an ex-partner and you fail to do so. These warrants are also issued by a Judge and again empower law enforcement agencies to arrest you.

Where do warrants show up on your records?

The assumption most people make is that a warrant will show up as part of your criminal record. But this is categorically not the case. If a warrant has been issued against you, it is an indication that you are a suspect in a crime, it does not imply guilt. No type of warrant is proof of guilt and they should therefore not appear on your criminal record.

But that does not mean that they will not be recorded elsewhere. Arrest warrants may not make it onto your own criminal record but they are listed on various other databases that can get picked up by a background check.

Bench warrants and civil warrants are issued by a court and are therefore part of court records. These are a matter of public record and can, therefore be accessed by anyone.

Will a warrant appear on your background check?

This is where things get a little bit complicated because the answer to this question depends on the type of background check an employer is running.

If you are just being subjected to a basic criminal background check, it is quite likely that any warrants that are outstanding against you will not show up. These types of checks will usually only look at your basic criminal record and other core information sources. Warrants should not appear on any of these data sources and so also shouldn’t show up on your background check.

However, some background checks will dig a little deeper and will check court records and other data sources. These background checks are likely to reveal any outstanding warrants against you.

If you are applying for a job with heightened security clearance or stronger vetting requirements, it is therefore quite likely that any warrants outstanding against you will appear on their background checks.

The search warrant exception

The one type of warrant you don’t have to worry about is a search warrant. These are issued by law enforcement agencies and give them the power to search your property or premises owned by you if they suspect that evidence relating to a criminal offense may be held there.

Like other types of warrant, a search warrant does not presume guilt but is merely a tool for law enforcement to use during their investigations. As a result, search warrants should not appear on your criminal record or in court documents.

This means it is highly unlikely that a search warrant will ever show up on a background check. Even if it did, most people know enough about search warrants to be aware that they do not indicate guilt.

How to check if a warrant shows up on your record

If you have an outstanding warrant against you or are concerned that a warrant that was issued in the past might still show up on your record, the best thing to do is to take a look. Criminal and court records are held in the public domain and you have every right to access this data too.

As with an employer, the easiest way for you to do this is by running a background check on yourself. There are two main types of background check. Professional background checks are used by employers and comply with all the relevant laws and regulations.

Public background checks are open for anyone to use. They are simple online tools and because they don’t have to comply with the same laws as professional checks, they will often turn up more information.

The only really tricky part of running a background check on yourself is knowing which site to use. But we can help you there too.

Best background checking sites for warrants

We have spent the past few months testing all the top background checking sites to discover which are able to deliver the most accurate and detailed results while at the same time offering a fast and user-friendly service.

As a part of those tests, we looked carefully at which sites were best able to reveal warrant details and the results were extremely interesting. They showed that there were three background checking sites that performed noticeably better than the rest.

Our researchers were unanimous in their findings that the top three background checking sites for warrant information are:

1. BeenVerified

BeenVerified - Editors choice

BeenVerified was the standout background checking site we tested. It delivered impressively accurate results and was able to dig out even the most obscure warrant records. They are even able to access records that haven’t been digitized and will, if necessary send a runner to county courts to search through records manually. BeenVerified presented the information it found in reports that were detailed and easy for even a layperson to read.

It also offers a really easy-to-use desktop dashboard and great apps for iOS and Android devices too. These make it easy to manage your searches wherever you are. There is also a great customer support service on hand if you have any problems.

For the most comprehensive results, we would recommend signing up for the BeenVerified premium package. This will cost an extra $9.95 per month on top of their basic subscription price of $26.89 per month. You can bring this down a little if you choose to pay $17.48 per month for a three-month subscription. This might sound a lot but is actually extremely competitive and definitely represents good value for money.

BEST BACKGROUND CHECKS: BeenVerified provides a comprehensive look into your public record at an outstanding price. Get it for less with our exclusive reader discount.

2. TruthFinder

TruthFinder - Editors choice

TruthFinder really impressed us with its hugely detailed searches that were able to find every last shred of information about every person whose details we input. Even if we used misleading data, TruthFinder was able to cut through this and deliver the right results every time.

TruthFinder offers a two-tier pricing structure. A one-month subscription starts at just $27.78 or you can opt to pay $23.02 for a two-month deal. For this basic package, you will get results that include a full criminal record check and the majority of court records. The information will be presented on a detailed and easy-to-read report and you will also have access to a superb 24/7 customer support service that is available on a toll-free number.

If you are happy to pay a little more for their premium package, you can be sure of receiving every record out there including hard-copy records from county courts. TruthFinder’s results are impressively detailed and if you need to be sure of getting the right information fast, TruthFinder is another great choice.

EXCLUSIVE DEAL: Looking for deep insight into your own public record? Try TruthFinder, one of the industry titans. Get the service with our generous reader discount.

3. Instant CheckMate

Instant Checkmate - Editors choice

Instant CheckMate was the fastest of all the background checking sites we tested. It consistently delivered results first and, even more impressively, was able to do so without compromising on quality. Its results were still extremely accurate and detailed and presented in a final report that was easy to interpret and scan through.

Managing your Instant CheckMate searches is easy using either their excellent desktop dashboard or their user-friendly mobile apps. If you do encounter any issues, there is a friendly and helpful support team on hand too.

Prices for Instant CheckMate start at $34.78 per month, but if you opt for the three-month subscription you can pay just $27.82 per month. This is a bit higher than some of their rivals. But if speed is your top priority, Instant CheckMate is well worth the extra cost.

What to do is a warrant does show up on your background check

We have explained how you can see whether a warrant shows up on your record, but what should you do if it does?

Firstly, read through the details of the job you are applying for carefully. It should explain what their background checks are looking for and give more detail about the type of offenses that they are looking for. If your warrant relates to something that is completely unrelated, you shouldn’t have too much to worry about.

The next question to ask is when the warrant was issued. All warrants will show up on a public background check, but professional checks are bound by different rules.

Specifically, the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) stipulates that employers cannot consider any criminal records that are more than seven years old. In some states, legislation has brought this time period down even more. His means if the warrant was issued more than seven years ago, it shouldn’t appear on your background check.

If the warrant is still outstanding and was issued more recently, you have the option of being honest about it and putting your side of the story across first. Some employers will take extenuating circumstances into account and overlook certain things on your record.

But perhaps the best way to deal with an outstanding warrant is to answer it. If you report to the court or law enforcement agencies, the warrant will no longer be on your record. Assuming you had not committed an offense, this means that the issue is resolved and you can proceed with your application.

Summary

There are different types of warrants in the USA and these are recorded in different ways. Different background checks also look at different data sets too. As a result, answering the question of whether a background check will reveal a warrant is not as simple as you might think.

In this guide, we have explained the different types of warrant and how they are recorded. We have also detailed which type of background checks they are likely to show up on and which they won’t.

The best way to see what warrants might show up is to run a background check on yourself. We have told you how to do this and recommended the best sites to use. Lastly, we have also given some pointers on what you can do if a warrant does show up that you think might prevent you from getting a job.

Have you ever lost out on a job because of a warrant on your record? What did you do about it? Have you ever managed to explain away a warrant to a prospective employer? Do you have any advice or tips for our readers that we haven’t covered in this article?

It is always helpful to hear to views and experiences of other readers, so why not share yours with us using the comment box below?

The post Do Warrants Show Up on a Background Check? appeared first on AddictiveTips.

What Is Included in a TSA Background Check?

Working in the secure area of an airport is a role with huge responsibility and it is, therefore, no surprise that it also requires extremely thorough background checks. In this guide, we will give you the low down on what to expect when you apply for a job through the TSA. We will tell you how their background checks work and what information they are looking for. We will also tell you how to check your own record to give you the best possible chance of landing the job.

The Transport Security Administration (TSA) is responsible for the hiring and management of many of the personnel who work in secure areas in and around airports.

All airport jobs involve an increased level of vetting, particularly since 9/11. But because the TSA employs people who work exclusively in secure areas at airports, their checks are particularly robust.

With more than 19,700 airports in the USA, 5,170 of which are open to the public, this means that the TSA hire an enormous number of people. But if you are planning to apply for a job with them, exactly what can you expect to happen?

How does the application process for a TSA job work? How does their background checking process work? And, perhaps the question we are asked most frequently, what information does a TSA background check look at.

In this guide, we are going to tell you everything you need to know about applying for a job with the TSA, including full details of their background checks. We will tell you what information they will be looking at and also advise you on how you can check your own record to see if you are likely to get the job of your dreams with the TSA.

How does the TSA recruit staff?

The TSA advertises for all its jobs on the official US Government recruitment website, USAJobs.org. This is a specialist public sector recruitment website and the application process it uses is pretty standard.

Once you are on the site, you can search for relevant jobs. You can search by location or keyword, which can include things like job title, department, agency, job series, or occupation.

This search is likely to throw up a great many vacancies so you can then narrow things down by filtering the results through things like location, pay, agency, appointment type, security clearance level, and whether the role is open to everyone or just veterans.

Once you have found an appropriate TSA position, click on the title and you will be able to read more about the job description including things like salary, appointment type, a summary of the duties and responsibilities, and details of what qualifications and experience are required.

If you meet all the relevant requirements and are keen to apply for the position, there is a large blue Apply button on the right-hand side of the screen.

Clicking on this will ask you to log-in or create a USAJobs.org account (if you haven’t already done so). It will then guide you through all the steps involved in applying for this role. This will vary from job to job, but generally speaking, will involve submitting a resume and cover letter or application form.

If you have any problems using the USAJobs.org website, there is a really helpful ‘Help’ section which addresses all of the most common problems.

How does the TSA background check work?

Since the terrorist attacks on 9/11, the TSA has beefed up the security around its positions considerably. This includes significantly enhancing the security checks of airport workers in order to try and keep airlines safe.

This has generally proved effective although one incident in 2015, where a baggage handler was caught smuggling firearms aboard commercial airlines did see the TSA enhancing their security checks still further.

These checks are now a fundamental part of the TSA’s hiring process and because of that will generally be run at an early stage in the hiring process. This can vary from job to job but, generally speaking, the initial application process for a TSA role is likely to include a form granting permission for them to run a background check on you.

If anything does come up on your background check that they are uncomfortable with you will either be asked about this in your interview or not be invited to an interview in the first place if the offense or issue is severe enough.

If this is the case, you should be informed of the fact and provided with a copy of the background check in question. This is a legal requirement for all employers under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

What information does a TSA Background Check look for?

The question that we get asked most about TSA job applications is exactly what information will they be looking at in their background checks. The truth is that this will depend to an extent on the role.

If the job is a more senior one or involves a great level of security clearance, the vetting of applications will obviously be more thorough. But as a bare minimum, they will also look into the following:

  • Criminal Records – The TSA will conduct a full felony and misdemeanor criminal record check. This will include all criminal records held at federal, state, and county levels.
  • Fingerprints Record Check – In addition, you will also have to submit your fingerprints which will be checked against the FBI fingerprint database.
  • Drug or alcohol related incidents – the TSA will look through all records over the past two years to check you do not have any drug or alcohol-related offenses on file.
  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Records – Full checks will be run against FAA files to ensure that any medical certificates or licenses issued by the FAA are genuine.
  • Air Carrier Record review – Your air carrier records will be thoroughly checked to ensure you have completed all the relevant training.
    • Driving record check – Your driving history will be checked to ensure that there are no vehicle violations, license suspensions, or other red flags on your file.
  • Social Security Number validations – Your social security number will be checked to ensure your identity and check your current address and any records of fraud.
  • License and certificate verifications – All licenses and certificates will be checked to ensure you have all the qualifications you have claimed.
  • Worker’s compensation history – This will be checked to see if you have a record of workplace accidents, injuries, or settlements.
  • References – The TSA are always through in checking all references to ensure your resume and other information proved checks out.

If you get through this process and are offered a job, you can then expect to be subjected to what the TSA describes as “real-time, recurring background checks”. This is a process that involves running regular checks on existing staff to ensure that the TSA is aware of any changes in your records or new offenses on your file.

How can you check your own record?

Such comprehensive background checks are justifiable from a security perspective but for applicants, it can still be a nerve-wracking time. With such detailed background checks, even people without a criminal record can still be worried that something on their file could cost them a dream job.

If you are in that position, you are probably wondering if there is anything you can do to put your mind at rest. There is one option open to you that can help you see in advance what information is on your record and, potentially do something to get information you are worried about removed.

You can run a background check on yourself.

There are two main types of background checking sites. Professional background checking sites are used by companies and organizations like the TSA to vet potential staff. They can dig out all public records and are also compliant with all relevant laws and regulations such as the FCRA.

Public background checking sites are open for anyone to use. They can access much of the same information as professional sites but are not bound by the restrictions and legal requirements of professional sites. As a result, a public background checking site can often find out more information.

The best thing is that a public background checking site is simple and easy to use and can generate accurate information in no more than a few minutes. They are a great way to see what information is on your record. The only hard part is choosing which public background checking site to use.

Best background checking site for TSA roles

There are dozens of different background checking sites around and, inevitably, they all claim to be the best in the business. The truth is that some are much better than others. So, the question for TSA applicants is which one they should opt for.

Fortunately, we can help. Our researchers have been testing all the top background checking sites to see which are best at digging up the most detailed and accurate information.

It has been an extensive project but the results are now in and there were three sites which performed head and shoulders above the rest. We can, therefore, recommend the following sites as the top three sites to use ahead of an application for a TSA role:

1. BeenVerified

BeenVerified - Editors choice

BeenVerified is the best background checking site we tested. It’s proved able to deliver accurate information every time even if we fed it with misleading or incorrect data. The final reports it produces were comprehensive and detailed and in all our tests it never missed a single record.

Using BeenVerified is easy. It offers subscribers a well-designed desktop dashboard and intuitive mobile apps for iOS and Android devices to manage their accounts on. These user-friendly tools make running search easy. It also presents the data it finds is a slick report that is really simple to analyze and read. There is even a responsive customer support team if you have any problems.

For the best results, we recommend the BeenVerified premium package. This costs an additional $9.95 per month but guarantees you will find every bit of data you need. This charge is on top of the basic subscription fee of $26.89 a month but you can be reduced this to $17.48 a month for a three-month package. These prices are hugely competitive for a site that really is head and shoulders above the rest.

BEST BACKGROUND CHECKS: BeenVerified provides a comprehensive look into your public record at an outstanding price. Get it for less with our exclusive reader discount.

2. Instant CheckMate

Instant Checkmate - Editors choice

Instant CheckMate is the fastest site we tested. Regardless of what search we ran, it was able to return results in moments, even if we gave it misleading information. These lightning-fast speeds don’t come at the expense of quality either. Its results were comprehensive and impressive with false positives an extremely rare occurrence.

Instant CheckMate has a well-designed desktop dashboard and neat mobile apps that all subscribers can access. Its final reports are simple to navigate and the customer support staff are friendly and helpful. As user-experiences go, this is up there with the very best.

Subscription rates start at $34.78 per month or $27.82 per month if you sign up for a three-month deal. This is a little more expensive than some other background checking sites, but if you need fast results, Instant CheckMate is well worth the money.

3. TruthFinder

TruthFinder - Editors choice

TruthFinder is a thorough and in-depth background checking site that is capable of digging out information on you that even you had forgotten. It’s is perhaps the most comprehensive and detailed site on the market and has a hugely impressive ability to get the right results even when fed with the wrong information.

Its results are pulled together in a detailed yet easy-to-read report. They also offer user-friendly apps and a desktop dashboard that make using their service simple and fun. Our researchers were also very impressed with their customer support which is available on a toll-free number and open 24/7.

A one-month subscription to TruthFinder is just $27.78 or you can bring it down even more to just $23.02 if you sign up for two months. If you pay a little more for their premium package, you can be sure of getting every last bit of information out there. As an all-round background checking service, TruthFinder is up there with the very best and our researchers were unanimous in their recommendation.

EXCLUSIVE DEAL: Looking for deep insight into your own public record? Try TruthFinder, one of the industry titans. Get the service with our generous reader discount.

What to do if your background check finds something

Running a background check is the best way to find out if there is anything on your record that might stop the TSA hiring you. But if your background check does return something that concerns you, what can you do about it.

In some cases, the answer will be nothing. For example, if you have a recent criminal record on file, it is impossible to hide it. Your best bet is to be upfront and truthful about it and try to explain what happened and why you are worth giving a chance too. This approach can work with some jobs, but because of the focus the TSA puts on security, you will have to make a very convincing case.

If your criminal record is older, you might be ok. Like all employers, the TSA has to comply with the FCRA and one of its rules is that you cannot consider a criminal record that is more than seven years old. Some states have made the threshold even shorter. There is still a chance that they could find out through references, social media content, or if a database has not been updated, but by law, they cannot use this as an excuse not to hire you.

There are a few other options open to you as well. Minor criminal offenses can sometimes be taken off your record if you can convince a court to seal or expunge the record. Some judgments will be wiped automatically once you have completed the necessary training courses or community works the court sets for you.

An unwelcome result on a background check doesn’t have to be the end of your employment hopes. Instead, it gives you the power of knowledge and lets you do everything possible to clean up your file and make yourself eligible for the job.

Summary

The TSA is one of the strictest employers in the USA and understandably so. The risks involved for them in hiring the wrong staff don’t bear thinking about so it is absolutely right that they vet all applicants thoroughly.

In this guide, we have explained how that application process works and also outlined the type of information their background checks are looking for. We have also shown you how to check your own records using a public background checking site and recommended the three best ones to use. We have also given you some tips on what to do if you do find a record that could be problematic.

Have you ever applied for a job with the TSA? How detailed was the background check? Did you have to explain away any records that came up? Do you have any tips for our readers on how to do this that we haven’t covered?

It is always helpful to hear the thoughts and experiences of all our readers so please do share yours with us using the comment box below.

The post What Is Included in a TSA Background Check? appeared first on AddictiveTips.

Will a DUI Show on a Criminal Background Check?

Driving Under Influence (DUI) is one of the most serious driving offenses you can commit. But if you have a DUI on your record, you might be wondering if it will show up on a criminal record check and, if so, how it will affect your prospects of getting a job. In this guide, we will explain everything you need to know about DUI convictions, explain how you can check whether your DUI shows up on a background check, and recommend the best sites to use to do this.

If you have a conviction for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs (commonly known as a DUI) you might be wondering if it will only show up on your driving record or whether your criminal history will detail it too.

By its very nature, DUI is a driving offense. But it is also considered a serious criminal offense that can result if your driving license being suspended or revoked, and even a jail sentence.

A few users have asked us whether their DUI will appear on a criminal background check and, if so, how it will affect their prospects of getting a job. In this guide, we will answer these questions and tell you everything you need to know about a DUI, how it is recorded, and what implications it has for a job application.

We will also explain how you can take a look at your own record to see how your DUI is classified and recommend the best sites to use to do this.

What is a DUI and how is it classified?

A DUI stands for Driving Under the Influence. It is a criminal offense that relates to driving or being in control of a motor vehicle while being under the influence of illegal drugs or having more than the legally permitted amount of alcohol in your bloodstream.

DUI is a serious offense but in most cases, a first DUI offense will only be classed as a misdemeanor. This is the law in all 50 states, although there are some extenuating circumstances that can change this, such as if someone is killed is a significant amount of damage is caused.

If you have more than one DUI on your record, you are likely to find it classified as a felony and be subject to much higher fines, a possible jail sentence, and have your driving license either suspended or revoked.

Will a DUI appear on your driving record?

Yes. Your driving record details anything related to your driving history. This means that every driving offense is recorded on it.

That includes parking tickets, speeding tickets, and any other driving offenses, including DUI. Any fines or penalties you receive as a result of a DUI will also be listed on your driving record as well as any points or changes to the status of your driving license.

If an employer runs a background check that looks at your driving record, they will, therefore, see details of your DUI listed.

Will a DUI appear on your criminal record?

Yes. A DUI is a serious criminal offense and even if it is a first-time offense and therefore classified as a misdemeanor, it will still appear on your criminal record just like any other misdemeanor.

This means that even if a prospective employer only runs a criminal background check and doesn’t look at your driving record, they will still see details of your DUI.

Because a DUI is both a criminal offense and a driving offense, it will appear on both records which means any employer that looks at either is going to find out.

Is my DUI a misdemeanor or a felony?

If your DUI was a first offense, the chances are that it will have been recorded as a misdemeanor on your criminal record.

However, there are some exceptions to this. If your DUI involved a fatality, someone being seriously injured, or a significant amount of damage being caused, it could still be recorded as a felony if that’s what the judge decides. You could even find extra charges such as vehicular manslaughter or criminal negligence being added to your records.

Other things that can affect the severity of your conviction and criminal record includes how much alcohol was in your system, whether there was a child in the car, and the status of your license and insurance.

If you have multiple DUI offenses on your record, the chances are that any latter ones have been recorded as a felony.

Will a DUI affect my job application?

This question depends on a number of different things including the type of job you are applying for, whether the job you are applying for plans to run a background check on you, where they will look, and whether it will ask you about your criminal history at all.

Fewer jobs these days are asking about people’s criminal history and some states and jurisdictions have banned the practice altogether. But plenty of jobs still do and if an application form asks, ‘have you ever been convicted of a criminal offense?’ you will have to truthfully reply yes. Any other answer would be dishonest and, if your employer finds this out, it is highly unlikely you would get hired for any job.

A lot of application forms will include a section that allows you to give details of your criminal history. This is an opportunity for you to explain the circumstances behind your DUI, outline any mitigating circumstances, and make the case for why an employer should overlook the conviction. If the application form doesn’t have this section, it is advisable to include such information on a separate sheet of paper if necessary.

Whether your prospective employer will take this information into account or not depends on the type of job you are applying for.

If it is an office-based job, manual labor, or something similar, there is no reason why they shouldn’t overlook a DUI. If the job involves driving or related tasks such as operating heavy equipment, they are more likely to take a DUI seriously.

Will my DUI definitely show up on a background check?

Probably, but necessarily. If your employer runs a background check that doesn’t take a look at either your driving record or your criminal history, it is quite possible that your DUI will not show up, providing there isn’t other evidence such as media coverage or social media posts about the incident. It should be noted that most background checks will cover at least one of these records.

There is then the issue of when your DUI took place. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the legislation that oversees background checks, any criminal records more than seven years old cannot be considered by employers. In some states, this length is even shorter.

However, while any criminal record of a DUI will not show up if it happened more than seven years ago, it will still show on your driving record. This means that if an employer looks at both, they will still find out about your DUI.

How can I find out if my DUI shows up on my background check?

If you want to find out the status of your DUI record and whether a DUI from your past will show up on your criminal background check, the best thing to do is run a background check on yourself.

There are two main types of background checking sites available. Professional sites are used by employers and are fully compliant with the FCRA and all other relevant laws and regulations.

Public background checking sites cannot be used by employers and are not compliant with these laws. But they are open for anybody to use and they will source information from many of the same sources. A public background check on a premium site should reveal all of your criminal history as well as the full details of your driving record.

In other words, if there is a DUI on your record, a public background checking site will find it.

Choosing the best background checking site

Deciding to run a background check on yourself is the easy part. Choosing which site to use is much harder. There are literally dozens of different public background checking sites out there and all claim to be the best in the business.

In reality, of course, some are far better than others, so how can you choose the best one?

Fortunately, our researchers have been testing all the top background checking sites so you don’t have to. They have run dozens of different names through their systems to see which can pull up the right information and how well they perform.

As a result of their tests, we can now confidently recommend three background checking sites that are head and shoulders above the rest. Our top three recommended sites are:

1. BeenVerified

BeenVerified - Editors choice

BeenVerified is the top background checking site to get accurate driving record and criminal history data. In our tests, it never once failed to produce accurate and up-to-date records. It also ran searches fast and produced impressively detailed final reports that were well presented and easy to read.

BeenVerified allows you to manage your searches on a user-friendly desktop dashboard or via their excellent mobile apps that are available for both iOS and Android devices. If you do encounter any problems, there is also a responsive and helpful customer support team available to help you.

A basic subscription to BeenVerified costs just $26.89 per month or you choose to pay $17.48 per month for a three-month package. We would also recommend adding their premium deal for an additional $9.95. This ensures no stone is left unturned and every available record will be dug out. For the quality of service, overall performance, and accuracy of the results, BeenVerified offers exceptional value for money.

BEST BACKGROUND CHECKS: BeenVerified provides a comprehensive look into your public record at an outstanding price. Get it for less with our exclusive reader discount.

2. Instant CheckMate

Instant Checkmate - Editors choice

Instant CheckMate is a superfast service that is the perfect choice if you need to check the state of your driving record and your criminal record urgently. In our tests, it performed faster than any other site while still generating comprehensive and accurate results. This data is presented in nice, well-designed reports that anyone can read and understand.

Instant Checkmate has impressive mobile apps for iOS and Android devices and a user-friendly desktop dashboard. It also has a customer support service that is helpful, friendly, and responsive.

At $34.78 per month or $27.82 per month for a three-month subscription, Instant CheckMate is not the cheapest site available. But if you need to find out details of your driver records and criminal history fast, Instant CheckMate is a terrific choice.

3. TruthFinder

TruthFinder - Editors choice

TruthFinder produces unerringly accurate driving and criminal record data every time. It is a site that really lives up to its name and even when we input inaccurate or misleading data, it was still able to dig out the right information every time.

TruthFinder does not have the most consistent speeds but it more than makes up for this with its consistency and accuracy. The detailed information it produces is set out in a final report that is really well-designed and the desktop dashboard and mobile apps you manage your searches on are exceptional. Another big USP is the customer support which is available 24/7 and accessible via a toll-free number.

TruthFinder prices are pretty reasonable and one thing our testers really appreciated was the sense that the customer is the top priority at all times. Not every site gives this feeling and it is one of several things that really makes TruthFinder stand out.

EXCLUSIVE DEAL: Looking for deep insight into your own public record? Try TruthFinder, one of the industry titans. Get the service with our generous reader discount.

Summary

If you have a DUI offense on your record, the chances are that it will show up on a background check. DUI’s are listed on both your driving record and your criminal history and there aren’t too many background checks that don’t look at at least one of those.

But just because a DUI will show up on a background check, doesn’t mean you don’t have a hope of landing the job. As we have explained, a first-time DUI is only classified as a misdemeanor and most jobs that don’t require you to drive or operate heavy machinery will not have a problem with that.

If you want to know how to check your own record, we have advised you to run a background check on yourself and we have also recommended the top three sites to do this.

Have you ever been convicted of a DUI? How was it recorded on your file and has the issue ever come up in a job interview or employment background check? If so, how did you handle the situation? Do you have any tips or advice for our readers that we haven’t mentioned in this article? If so, please do share them with us using the comment box below.

The post Will a DUI Show on a Criminal Background Check? appeared first on AddictiveTips.