How to install the LightningBug GTK theme on Linux

LightningBug is a beautiful, Yellowish GTK theme for Linux. It comes in two variants: dark and light. The design is reminiscent of Mac OS but with a unique yellow tinge. Here’s how to install it on Linux!

LightningBug GTK theme on Linux

Downloading LightningBug

The LightningBug GTK theme is available to all Linux users via the Gnome-look.org theme website. To get your hands on this theme, start by heading over to the LightningBug Gnome-look.org page.

Once on the LightningBug page, find the “Files” button. The “Files” area has a wide variety of LightningBug theme package files to download. The choices include LightningBug Dark, LightningBug Light, LightningBug Light Solid, and LightningBug Dark Solid.

Inside the “Files” area, look to the “DL” column. Once in this column, click on the blue “DL” button next to the theme you wish to download to grab your LightningBug theme package.

Extracting LightningBug

The LightningBug theme is distributed on the internet through Tar XZ archives. These archives are handy and allow Linux creators to distribute theme files efficiently. However, you cannot use theme files that are packed in the Tar XZ format. They must be extracted first.

To start the extraction process on your computer, you must launch a terminal window. To launch a terminal window on the Linux desktop, press the Ctrl + Alt + T keyboard combination. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and launch it that way.

When the terminal window is open and ready to use, make use of the CD command to enter the “Downloads” directory where the LightningBug theme package was downloaded. 

cd ~/Downloads

Inside the “Downloads” directory, the extraction can begin. Using the tar command to decompress the LightningBug theme pack you downloaded from Gnome-look.org.

To extract the LightningBug Dark GTK theme package, make use of the command below.

tar xvf Lightningbug-Dark.tar.xz

To extract the LightningBug Light GTK theme package on your computer, execute the following terminal command.

tar xvf Lightningbug-Light.tar.xz

To extract the LightningBug Light Solid theme package on your computer, you’ll need to run the command below.

tar xvf Lightningbug-Light-Solid.tar.xz

Want to extract the LightningBug Dark Solid GTK theme on your computer? Execute the command below.

tar xvf Lightningbug-Dark-Solid.tar.xz

Installing LightningBug

Now that the LightningBug GTK theme is fully extracted in your “Downloads” folder, the installation of the theme can begin. There are two ways of installing the LightningBug GTK theme on Linux. These two methods of installation are known as “single-user” and “system-wide.”

The single-user installation method is ideal for Linux users who do not share a PC and do not want other users to access the LightningBug GTK theme. The system-wide installation method is best for users who have multiple accounts on their Linux system and want every user to access the LightningBug theme.

In this guide, we’ll cover both methods. To start the installation process, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop. You can open up a terminal window on the desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or searching for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Single-user

The first step in installing LightningBug in single-user mode is to create a new folder with the name “.themes” in your home directory. This folder will allow Linux desktop environments to load themes just for your user account.

To create the new folder, make use of the mkdir command below.

mkdir -p ~/.themes/

After creating the new theme folder, use the CD command to move the terminal window into the “Downloads” directory where the LightningBug GTK theme was previously extracted.

cd ~/Downloads/

Once inside of the “Downloads” directory, use the mv command to install the LightningBug GTK theme to the “.themes” folder. 

mv Lightningbug*/ ~/.themes/

When the command completes, the installation is finished. Confirm the installation was successful by executing the ls command below.

ls ~/.themes

System-wide

To install the LightningBug GTK theme in system-wide mode, start by accessing the “Downloads” directory in your home folder, where the theme package was previously extracted.

cd ~/Downloads

Once in the “Downloads” folder, you must log in to the root user account, as installing in system-wide mode requires modifying some system folders. 

sudo -s 

Now that the terminal has root access install the LightningBug GTK theme into the /usr/share/themes/ folder by making use of the mv command below.

mv Lightningbug*/ /usr/share/themes/

After the command completes, the LightningBug GTK theme is installed. From here, use the ls command to confirm it was successful.

ls /usr/share/themes/ 

Activating LightningBug

The LightningBug GTK theme is now installed onto your Linux PC, but it isn’t the default GTK theme. The reason for this is that simply installing a GTK theme doesn’t make it the default look on your Linux desktop. These things must be changed manually. 

If you’re unsure about how to change your default GTK theme on Linux to LightningBug, we can help! Follow along with one of the guides linked below to learn about changing the default GTK theme on Linux!

The post How to install the LightningBug GTK theme on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to install the Equilibrium GTK theme on Linux

The Equilibrium GTK theme is based on LinMOS. It presents a mid-2000’s Mac OS skeuomorphism style. If you’d like to try out this theme on your Linux PC, it’s easier than you think! Here’s how to get it going!

Equilibrium GTK theme on Linux

Downloading Equilibrium

The Equilibrium GTK theme is available to all Linux users via the Gnome-look.org theme website. On the Gnome-look.org page, there are four download options, each a different variation of the theme.

To start the download on your Linux PC, head over to the Equilibrium Gnome-look.org page. Once on the page, find the “Files” tab, and click on it with the mouse. 

Look through the “Files” tab for the theme pack you wish to download. Once you’ve found the theme file you want to download, go to the “DL” tab and click on the blue download button next to the theme pack you wish to download.

Extracting Equilibrium

The Equilibrium theme pack is distributed to Linux users in the form of Tar XZ archives. These archives cannot be used as themes, as GTK themes must be fully extracted before using them on Linux.

To extract the Equilibrium Tar XZ archive on your computer, you must open up a terminal window. To open up a terminal window, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and launch it that way.

Once the terminal window is open, you must move into the “Downloads” directory. To access the “Downloads” directory, use the CD command to move into the folder where the Equilibrium theme pack is.

cd ~/Downloads

Now that you’re inside the “Downloads” directory, use the tar command to extract the Equilibrium theme pack on your computer. To start the extraction, use the commands below.

Did you download the Equilibrium Blue theme pack? Extract it on your computer with the following command.

Equilibrium-Blue-1.0.tar.xz

Need to extract the Equilibrium Blue Dark theme? You can do that with the command below.

Equilibrium-Blue-Dark-1.0.tar.xz

To extract the Equilibrium Blue Solid theme pack, make use of the following command.

Equilibrium-Blue-Solid-1.0.tar.xz

To get your hands on the Equilibrium Blue Dark Solid GTK theme pack, you’ll need to enter the following command in a terminal window.

Equilibrium-Blue-Dark-Solid-1.0.tar.xz

Installing Equilibrium

Now that Equilibrium has been extracted, the next step in the setup process is to install the theme files to the system. There are two ways to install the Equilibrium theme on Linux. 

The first way of installing the Equilibrium GTK theme on Linux is through single-user mode. This mode allows only the user that installs the theme onto the operating system to have access to it on their desktop.

The second way of installing the Equilibrium GTK theme is known as system-wide mode. This type of installation is much more involved than the single-user method as it requires the modification of system folders, but it allows all users on the system to enjoy the theme.

Single-user

To start the installation of Equilibrium in single-user mode, you’ll need to create a new folder in your home directory with the name “.themes.” This folder will enable your Linux desktop to access theme files installed as a single-user. Using the mkdir command below, create the new folder.

mkdir -p ~/.themes

After creating the new folder, you must move the terminal session into the “Downloads” directory where the Equilibrium theme package was extracted previously. To access this folder, make use of the CD command.

cd ~/Downloads

Once inside the “Downloads” directory, the installation can begin. Using the mv command, move the Equilibrium theme package files from the “Downloads” directory to the newly created “.themes” folder in your home directory.

mv Equilibrium*/ ~/.themes/

When the mv command is complete, the installation of Equilibrium on Linux in single-user mode is complete. To verify that the installation was successful, execute the ls command below.

ls ~/.themes/

System-wide

To start the installation of Equilibrium in system-wide mode, you must first access the “Downloads” directory in which the Equilibrium theme package was extracted previously. Using the CD command, move into “Downloads.”

cd ~/Downloads

Once inside the “Downloads” directory, you must elevate the terminal session to the root user, as installing Equilibrium requires modifying system-level files. 

sudo -s

Now that the terminal has root access use the mv command to install the Equilibrium GTK theme in system-wide mode on your Linux PC.

mv Equilibrium*/ /usr/share/themes/

When the installation is complete, Equilibrium is installed. To confirm it was successfully installed, run the command below.

ls /usr/share/themes/

Activating Equilibrium

The Equilibrium theme is now installed on your computer, but that’s not the end of the guide. You can’t start using the Equilibrium theme without first making it your default GTK theme. 

To make Equilibrium your default GTK theme on Linux, take a look at the list of links below. Each of the links points to an in-depth guide on how to change the default GTK theme on your Linux desktop.

The post How to install the Equilibrium GTK theme on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to reset the favorite list in Gnome Shell on Linux

Is the favorite list on your Gnome Shell desktop getting too full? Don’t want to go through and manually unfavorite a bunch of apps to clear it out? If so, this guide is for you. Follow along as we show you how you can quickly reset the favorites list in Gnome Shell on Linux!

Note: looking for information on how to reset Gnome Shell to defaults? Check out our guide on the subject.

Reset favorite list with the GUI

The favorite list in Gnome Shell is what you see in the Gnome overview mode on the dock when the Win key on the keyboard is pressed. The favorite list holds all of the apps you’ve added to the dock for quick access. As you use Gnome Shell, this favorite list may become cluttered and messy. Thankfully, you can reset it using the GUI. 

The GUI tool you can use to reset the favorite list is Dcof editor. It’s a graphical editing tool that allows you to customize and modify the Gnome Shell desktop environment’s settings files. However, the Dconf editor isn’t pre-installed on many Linux OSes, so we must demonstrate how to install it first.

To start the installation of the Dconf editor on your Linux PC, launch a terminal on the Linux desktop. Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, follow the command-line installation instructions outlined below that corresponds with the Linux OS you currently use.

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, you can install the Dconf editor on your computer using the Apt install command below.

sudo apt install dconf-editor

Debian

The Dconf editor application can easily be set up on Debian Linux by executing the following Apt-get command in a terminal.

sudo apt-get install dconf-editor

Arch Linux

Those on Arch Linux will be able to get the Dconf editor using the following Pacman command in a terminal window.

sudo pacman -S dconf-editor

Fedora

If you’re on Fedora Linux, there’s a good chance Dconf editor may already be installed. The reason for this is that Fedora works closely with Gnome. If, however, the Dconf editor isn’t pre-installed, you can get it set up by executing the following dnf command in a terminal window.

sudo dnf install dconf-editor

OpenSUSE

On OpenSUSE Linux, the Dconf editor may be pre-installed on the Gnome version. If it is, there is no need to follow the installation instructions. If, however, you do not have it set up on your Linux PC, you can quickly get it set up by executing the following zypper command.

sudo zypper install dconf-editor

Once you’ve gotten the Dconf editor installed on your Linux PC, launch it by searching for “Dconf editor” in the application menu in Gnome. When the app is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to clear your favorites list!

Step 1: Upon opening up the Dconf editor, you will see a notification appear in the center of the app window. This notification warns you that messing with the editor could break things. Select the “I’ll be careful” button to continue.

Step 2: Look through the list of folders in Dconf editor, and select the “org” folder.

Step 3: After selecting the “org” folder, look for the “gnome” folder and click on it.

Step 4: Once you’ve selected the “gnome” folder, click on the “shell” folder to access it.

Step 5: Inside the “shell” folder, you will see tons of different Gnome Shell options. Scroll through and look for “favorite-apps.” Then, click on it with the mouse to access the “favorite-apps” configuration.

Step 6: Scroll through “favorite-apps” to the bottom, and you’ll see “Custom value.” This value is filled with all of the custom favorites you’ve added to the Gnome dock. To reset it, click on the “Use default value” button, and it will reset to default.

Close Dconf editor when done!

Reset favorite list with terminal

The GUI app is handy for resetting the favorite list in Gnome, and beginner Linux users are sure to love it. However, the GUI isn’t for everyone. If you prefer to use the Linux terminal on your system, you’ll want to be able to reset your Gnome Shell favorites list using the command-line.

To start the reset process, open up a terminal window on the Gnome desktop. Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, it’s time to reset the favorites list using the gsettings command below.

gsettings reset org.gnome.shell favorite-apps

Keep in mind that this command will completely wipe out your favorites list from the dock, with no way to back it up. Only execute this command once you’re sure you’re ready to clear the favorites bar!

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How to change the default Yaru Colors on Ubuntu

Ubuntu’s default theme is known as “Yaru.” It looks charming on the Ubuntu desktop but a little boring and doesn’t add a lot of life to Ubuntu. If you’d like to improve your Ubuntu desktop look, you can install the Yaru Colors theme.

Yaru Colors is a modification of the Yaru theme for Ubuntu. However, instead of just drab Ubuntu orange, you get a variety of different colors that are sure to spice up your Ubuntu desktop.

Before we begin

This guide will focus on the Ubuntu Gnome Desktop and its default GTK theme, Yaru. We’ll go over how to make the desktop look more colorful by replacing the default theme with Yaru Colors.

That said, Yaru Colors isn’t restricted to Ubuntu and the Ubuntu Gnome Desktop. While the Yaru Colors theme isn’t intended to be used on anything other than the Ubuntu Gnome Desktop, it is possible to install it on any Linux OS and any GTK-based desktop environment.

Downloading Yaru Colors 

The Yaru Colors GTK theme is available on GitHub and comes with an installation script. The installation script means that you can quickly get everything up and running without many tedious commands in a terminal window.

Install Git package

To start the download process, you will need to install the Git package on your Ubuntu Linux PC. To install it, open up a terminal window. Once it is open, make use of the apt install command below to get Git working.

sudo apt install git

Download Yaru colors

Now that the Git tool is set up on your computer, you can download the latest release of Yaru Colors using the git clone command in a terminal window. Keep in mind that the downloader may take a couple of minutes, as there are many files to grab.

git clone https://github.com/Jannomag/Yaru-Colors.git

If you’re not a fan of using the git clone command and the Git tool, you can download the latest Yaru Colors TarGZ from the release section on GitHub. However, we will not focus on this release in the guide, so keep that in mind.

Once the Yaru Colors theme files are done downloading to your Linux PC, use the ls command to verify the folder’s contents to ensure everything is downloaded correctly.

ls ~/Yaru-Colors

After verifying the folder’s contents with the ls command, we need to enter the “Yaru-Colors” folder with the CD command. 

cd ~/Yaru-Colors

When you’ve entered the “Yaru-Colors” folder, move on to the next section of the guide to get the theme files installed.

Installing Yaru Colors

Installing the Yaru Colors GTK theme on your Ubuntu desktop can be done in two ways. The first way is the single-user mode, which makes Yaru Colors only accessible to the person who installs it. The second is the system-wide mode, making it so that every user on your Ubuntu desktop will have access to the Yaru Colors GTK theme, even if they never installed the theme files.

In this guide, we’ll cover both methods of installation. However, we highly recommend going the single-user route, as the installation script works much better in single-user mode.

Single-user

To install the Yaru Colors theme on your Ubuntu PC as a single-user, start by executing the installation script without the sudo command. By doing this, you will be running the script without root privileges, thus not allowing it to install the themes in the root directory.

./install.sh

Following the command, you will see a text-based UI appear on the screen. Press any key to start. After pressing any key, the installer will begin asking you questions on setting up the theme. Answer the questions to install the theme.

Once you get most of the questions, you will arrive at the last question. This question will ask if you wish to enable the theme. Press for yes to enable Yaru Colors.

System-wide

To install the Yaru Colors theme in system-wide mode, you need to run the script as root. To do that, run the script using the sudo command. By running with sudo, the script will place all files in the system-wide theme folders.

sudo ./install.sh

Upon running the installation command, you will be asked several questions on how you wish to install the Yaru Colors theme. Be sure to thoroughly read through all of the prompts in the script to get Yaru Colors installed and activated on your Ubuntu system.

Enable Yaru Colors on non-Ubuntu desktops

If you want to enable Yaru Colors on non-Ubuntu desktop environments, you’ll need to install it with the installation script. After that, you can attempt to enable them. If enabling doesn’t work, you can manually enable the Yaru Colors theme by following one of the guides linked below.

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How to make KDE apps look better on XFCE in Linux

Apps built with QT (aka KDE apps) do not look great on the XFCE 4 desktop because they don’t respect the default theme. The way to fix this is to use Kvantum. With Kvantum, you can set KDE app themes to use a similar theme to what you use in XFCE 4.

Before we begin

In this guide, we’ll be using the Adapta GTK theme for XFCE. We’re focusing on Adapta because it has a Kvantum theme that is widely available and helps blend KDE apps in with XFCE 4 quite well.

Before starting this guide, we highly recommend installing the Adapta GTK theme onto your Linux PC and enabling it as the default theme in XFCE. For information on how to set up Adapta, click here.

Installing Kvantum on Linux

To get Kvantum working on your Linux PC, you will need to install it alongside the management tool. To get started, open up a terminal window and install the Kvantum manager, as well as everything else necessary to use it.

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, you can get the Kvantum tools on your system via the Papirus PPA. This PPA has everything you need to get it working. To add the PPA, use the following add-apt-repository command.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:papirus/papirus

After adding the Papirus PPA to your Linux PC, run the update command to refresh your software sources. 

sudo apt update

Finally, use the apt install command below to get the Kvantum packages to use the Kvantum theme engine on Ubuntu.

sudo apt install qt5-style-kvantum qt5-style-kvantum-themes

Debian

On Debian 11 and 10, the Kvantum packages should be available for installation without any need to add a third-party software repository to your computer. To get it working, open up a terminal window and enter the command below.

sudo apt-get install qt5-style-kvantum qt5-style-kvantum-themes

Arch Linux

Kvantum is available to Arch Linux users and has been for a very long time. There is an AUR package. There’s also a package in the official Arch Linux software sources, which we recommend.

To get the latest Kvantum on your Arch Linux PC, enter the following terminal command. 

sudo pacman -S kvantum-qt5

Fedora

On Fedora Linux, you can get the latest Kvantum on your PC with the following Dnf command. There is no need to add any third-party software repositories, as they’re inside the official software sources.

sudo dnf install kvantum

OpenSUSE

Kvantum is available to OpenSUSE users via a third-party software repository. To start the installation, you must add the repo with the command below.

sudo zypper ar obs://home:trmdi trmdi

After adding the software repo, you can install the latest version of Kvantum on your OpenSUSE PC using the zypper command below.

sudo zypper in -r trmdi kvantum

Downloading Kvantum themes

In this guide, we’re focusing on the Kvantum Adapta theme. However, if you want to use a different GTK theme and need a matching Kvantum theme to go with it, the best place to go is the KDE Store.

The KDE Store has tons of stuff to download, including Kvantum theme engine themes. To download a Kvantum theme, head over to the Kvantum page on the KDE store. From there, look through the latest themes to download.

Once you’ve downloaded a theme, launch Kvantum Manager, select “Install/Update Theme,” and install it. Then, select “Change/Delete Theme” to start using it on your system.

Using Kvantum to make KDE apps look better

To make your KDE apps look better on the XFCE 4 desktop, start by launching “Kvantum Manager” from the app menu. If you cannot find it in the app menu, open up the XFCE 4 quick launcher with Alt + F2, and enter “kvantummanager” in the launch box.

Once the Kvantum Manager app is open on the XFCE 4 desktop, follow the step-by-step instructions outlined below.

Step 1: Locate the “Change/Delete Theme” option in the Kvantum Manager. If you cannot find it, it is directly below the “Install/Update Theme.” 

After selecting the “Change/Delete Theme” button, you will see a menu that says “Select a theme,” followed by a blank text box. Change it to “Kvdapta.” 

Step 2: Open up a terminal window and install the Qt5ct app.

Ubuntu
sudo apt install qt5ct
Debian
sudo apt-get install qt5ct
Arch Linux
sudo pacman -S qt5ct
Fedora
sudo dnf install qt5ct
OpenSUSE
sudo zypper install qt5ct

Step 3: Open up a terminal window and use the echo command to edit the profile file to add the environmental variable.

echo "export QT_QPA_PLATFORMTHEME=qt5ct" >> ~/.profile

Step 4: Log out of your XFCE 4 session and log back in.

Step 5: Open up Qt5ct via the app menu. Or, launch it via the terminal with the qt5ct command.

Step 6: Locate the “Appearance” tab. Then, find the “Style” menu. In the menu, select “kvantum.” Then, select “Apply” to apply changes.

Upon applying your changes, KDE applications on XFCE 4 should be using the Kvantum theme set up earlier. 

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