How to Stop Chrome (or Edge) From Taking Over Your Media Keys

chrome logo

Google Chrome now has built-in support for media keys. Unfortunately, Chrome will take over your media keys and prevent them from controlling apps like Spotify when you’re watching YouTube, for example. Here’s how to make Chrome ignore your media keys.

This same tip also applies to the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser. In both browsers, however, this option requires an experimental flag that may be removed in the future. We tested it in the latest version of Chrome—Chrome 75—on June 24, 2019.

You’ll find this option on the chrome://flags page. Copy the following address, paste it into Chrome’s Omnibox, also known as the address bar, and press Enter:

chrome://flags/#hardware-media-key-handling

(In Microsoft Edge, go to edge://flags/#hardware-media-key-handling  instead.)

Click the “Default” box to the right of the Hardware Media Key Handling setting and select “Disabled.”

You’ll have to restart Chrome (or Edge) before this change takes effect. Click the “Relaunch Now” button that appears to restart your browser.

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6 Great Features in Windows 10’s New Game Bar

Windows 10 version 1903's new game bar overlay

Windows 10’s May 2019 Update features an all-new game bar experience. It’s not just for capturing videos anymore. It’s now an overlay packed with useful tools, including quick panels for adjusting application volume, seeing resource usage, and playing Spotify music.

How to Open the Game Bar

To open the game bar, press Windows+G. It will appear as an overlay over the game you’re playing. It will also appear over your desktop or any other application you’re using, but it’s most useful when you’re playing a game. Press Windows+G again to close it.

While Microsoft still calls this the “game bar,” that’s a misleading name at this point. It’s a proper overlay with multiple panels now, not just a single bar. If you see a smaller bar, you haven’t installed Windows 10’s May 2019 Update yet.

While the Game Bar is visible, you can click the “Home” icon on the top panel—it looks like a menu button—to choose which panels are visible in the overlay environment.

Game bar overlays menu

If Windows+G doesn’t do anything, make sure the game bar is enabled. Head to Settings > Gaming > Game Bar, ensure the “Record game clips, screenshots, and broadcast using Game bar” option is enabled, and check that you haven’t changed the shortcut from Win+G to anything else. If you set a custom shortcut, use that instead of Win+G.

Option to enable or disable Game bar in Settings

Adjust Application Volume

Audio panel in Windows 10 game bar overlay

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Steam Won’t Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

Stylized Steam logo

Do you use Steam on Ubuntu? You may have to switch to a new Linux distro in the future. A Valve developer announced that Steam won’t officially support Ubuntu 19.10 or future releases. Ubuntu-based Linux distributions are also affected.

This is all because Canonical announced plans to drop 32-bit packages and libraries from Ubuntu 19.10. These packages enable 32-bit software to run on 64-bit versions of Ubuntu.

While most Linux applications will get along just fine, this is a huge blow to Valve’s Steam. Many Linux games on Steam are only available in 32-bit form—they work on 64-bit Linux distributions, but only with the 32-bit libraries. As Phoronix recently pointed out, this also affects the Wine compatibility layer that allows running Windows software on Linux—Wine won’t be able to run 32-bit Windows software anymore. Steam’s compatibility layer for running Windows games on Linux would also not work for 32-bit games.

After Canonical’s announcement, Valve’s Pierre-Loup Griffais tweeted that Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases “will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users.” Valve will officially support and recommend a different Linux distribution in the future.

The good news is that your existing Ubuntu installation—whether it’s Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” or Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver”—will continue running Steam and its Linux games for years to come.

The bad news is that Linux gamers who enjoy Ubuntu will likely have to switch to a different Linux distribution in the future—unless Canonical or Valve change course.

Microsoft’s New Windows Terminal Is Now Available

New Windows Terminal showing Linux applications
Microsoft via The Verge

You can now download a preview version of the new Windows Terminal app from the Store on Windows 10! Microsoft released this application on the evening of June 21 after a listing showed up earlier that day.

After downloading the Windows Terminal app from the Store, you can take advantage of all the new features—including tabs, finally! You can combine tabs from the traditional Command Prompt, Linux Bash instances, and PowerShell in the same window. It’s a deeply customizable environment, too. Here’s how Microsoft describes it:

The Windows Terminal is the new, powerful, open source terminal application that was announced at Build 2019. Its main features include multiple tabs, Unicode and UTF-8 character support, a GPU accelerated text rendering engine, and custom themes, styles, and configurations.

For more information about this awesome new application, read Microsoft’s blog post announcing the release. We look forward to playing with it a lot more in the days to come.

Microsoft says you need “Windows 10 version 18362” to use the application. That’s the build number associated with the May 2019 Update, so you’ll need either that or a Windows Insider build installed.

RELATED: Everything New in Windows 10’s May 2019 Update, Available Now

How to Report a Fake Business Listing on Google Maps

Google Maps showing Googleplex location

The Wall Street Journal reports that Google Maps is overrun with fake business listings created by scammers, and Google says it removed more than 3 million of them in 2018. Here’s how to report any fake businesses you see.

We’ve done this before when we noticed a nearby business listing was fake and didn’t match a real business in its location. The fake business listing vanished immediately after we reported it. By reporting any scams you see, you’ll be doing everyone who uses Google Maps a big favor.

To report a listing, locate and select the business listing in Google Maps. Click or tap the “Suggest an Edit” button.

Suggest an Edit button in Google Maps

Select “Remove this place” to tell Google the listing should be removed from Google Maps. If you’re not signed into a Google account, you’ll be prompted to log in before you continue.

(If a scammer has taken over a real business listing with a fake phone number or website, you should instead select “Change name or other details” and provide the business’s real details.)

Option to remove a listing from Google Maps

Provide a reason for the removal—this is technically optional, but it will tell Google why the business should be removed. For example, you can select “Doesn’t exist” or “Spam, fake, or offensive” if the business is a fake listing or a scam.

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