How to Move Fortnite to Another Folder, Drive, or PC

Epic’s launcher only lets you move Fortnite by uninstalling and redownloading it. Here’s how to move Fortnite to another folder or copy it to another PC—without the 32 GB download.

Back Up Your Fortnite Folder

First, you’ll need to create a backup copy of your Fortnite folder. Fornite installs to C:\Program Files\Epic Games\Fortnite by default, so you’ll probably find it there. Navigate to that folder in an Explorer window.

Right-click the “Fortnite” folder and select “Copy” to copy it to your clipboard.

Paste a copy of the Fortnite folder into another location. For example, if you plan on moving Fortnite from your C: drive to your D: drive, you might want to paste it to your D: drive. If you plan on moving Fortnite from one PC to another, paste the Fortnite folder onto an external USB drive.

Do not immediately copy the Fortnite folder to your desired location. For example, if you want to install Fortnite to D:\Epic Games\Fortnite, don’t immediately copy the folder there. Instead, consider copying it to D:\Temporary\Fortnite for now.

Wait for the file-copying process to complete before continuing.

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How to Move Fortnite to Another Folder, Drive, or PC

Epic’s launcher only lets you move Fortnite by uninstalling and redownloading it. Here’s how to move Fortnite to another folder or copy it to another PC—without the 32 GB download.

Back Up Your Fortnite Folder

First, you’ll need to create a backup copy of your Fortnite folder. Fornite installs to C:\Program Files\Epic Games\Fortnite by default, so you’ll probably find it there. Navigate to that folder in an Explorer window.

Right-click the “Fortnite” folder and select “Copy” to copy it to your clipboard.

Paste a copy of the Fortnite folder into another location. For example, if you plan on moving Fortnite from your C: drive to your D: drive, you might want to paste it to your D: drive. If you plan on moving Fortnite from one PC to another, paste the Fortnite folder onto an external USB drive.

Do not immediately copy the Fortnite folder to your desired location. For example, if you want to install Fortnite to D:\Epic Games\Fortnite, don’t immediately copy the folder there. Instead, consider copying it to D:\Temporary\Fortnite for now.

Wait for the file-copying process to complete before continuing.

Read the remaining 32 paragraphs

Here We Go Again: 127 Million Accounts Stolen From 8 More Websites

Keys in a lock
HAKINMHAN/Shutterstock.com

Several days ago, a hacker put 617 million accounts from 16 different websites for sale on the dark web. Now, the same hacker is offering 127 million more records from another eight websites.

As TechCrunch reports, the eight new websites are:

Houzz (57 million), YouNow (40 million), Ixigo (18 million), Stronghold Kingdoms (5 million), Roll20 (4 million), Ge.tt (1.8 million), PetFlow (1 million), Coinmama (450,000)

The hacker is selling all the data together for about $14,500 worth of Bitcoin. Anyone who has that much cash can buy it.

If you have an account on any of these websites—or any of the other websites that have been compromised—you’ll want to change your password right now. The same is true if you used a password on one of these websites and reused it elsewhere. That’s why you shouldn’t reuse passwords across multiple websites. We recommend using a password manager to remember all those strong, unique passwords for you.

RELATED: Change Your Passwords: 617 Million Accounts Were Stolen Across 16 Different Sites

Windows 10 Will Finally Offer Easy Access to Linux Files

Ubuntu and openSUSE shortcuts in Windows 10's Start menu

Windows 10’s April 2019 Update brings a long-awaited feature: Support for easily accessing, viewing, and even modifying Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) files from File Explorer or via the command line.

Previously, it was possible to find your Linux files in your AppData folder, but Microsoft warns against that. Modifying files here would break things. Now, there’s an easier, official way to access these files with Windows tools—without the risk of breaking anything!

Microsoft’s Craig Loewen explains how it works: Rather than accessing these files directly, Windows runs a Plan 9 server as part of the WSL software in the background. Windows 10 has “a Windows service and driver that acts as the client and talks to the Plan9 server.” That server translates your file operations and handles Linux metadata such as file permissions, ensuring everything works properly even when you access a file with a Windows tool. But that’s just the complicated stuff that happens in the background, and you don’t have to think about it.

You can open a File Explorer window directly in the current directory from within a Linux shell environment. Just type the following command into the Bash shell:

explorer.exe .

You can work with files normally from here. Use drag and drop, copy and paste them, or even open them directly in Windows applications to modify them.

A Linux home directory in File Explorer
Microsoft

Microsoft may change how this works in the future. But, for now, you can also type following path into an Explorer window to access a Linux distribution’s files:

\\wsl$\<running_distro_name>\

In other words, if you’re running Ubuntu’s Bash shell, you’d type:

\\wsl$\Ubuntu\

This also works from the command line, of course. In PowerShell or the Command Prompt, the command cd \\wsl$\Debian\ changes to the root directory of your installed Debian system.

Linux files displayed in PowerShell
Microsoft

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Get Help With File Explorer on Windows 10

Windows 10 no longer has built-in help for File Explorer, as Windows 7 does. Microsoft makes you search the web for information, so here’s what you need to know about using Windows 10’s file manager.

File Explorer Interface Basics

While it’s been renamed “File Explorer” in Windows 10, this application is basically the same as Windows Explorer on Windows 7. It does have some new features, including a ribbon interface and built-in Microsoft OneDrive for syncing your files to the cloud.

The “Quick Access” area in the sidebar replaces “Favorites” on Windows 10. You can drag and drop folders to the Quick Access area to “pin” them for easy access in the future. Windows 10 will automatically add your recently used folders to this area, too. You can customize Quick Access from the options window. To remove an individual folder from Quick Access, right-click it and select “Unpin From Quick Access.”

The “This PC” section replaces the “My Computer” item on Windows 7. It contains shortcuts to user data folders on your PC as well as other drives, such as USB drives and DVD drives.

How to Use the Ribbon

The ribbon in File Explorer works just like the ribbon in Microsoft Office applications like Word and Excel. There are a few different ways you can use it.

If you want more space in your file browsing windows, you can leave the ribbon collapsed by default. You can still click any of the tabs at the top—like “Home,” “Share,” or “View” to view the commands and click a button. The ribbon will only appear temporarily.

If you’d rather see the ribbon all the time, you can expand it. To do so, either click the arrow near the top right corner of the File Explorer window or press Ctrl+F1.

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