How to Succeed in an Online Class

man studying intently while working on an online class
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The internet has revolutionized the world of education. Today, ebooks can replace stacks of textbooks, and productivity apps now help students stay focused. And some students even get their education without leaving the house, thanks to online classes.

Whether you’re doing a fully online degree program or just taking a free online course to learn a new skill, online classes can be wonderful. However, they also offer unique challenges far different from those of a classroom setting.

How can you make online school work for you? These tips will help you get the most out of online courses of any sort, from beginners’ cooking classes to advanced mathematics.

Schedule Your Own “Class Time”

One of the best, and also one of the hardest, things about online classes is the lack of strict scheduling. While some elements (like video lectures) might happen live, for the most part, online courses require you to keep up on your own time.

If you struggle with time management, consider scheduling a set number of hours on a set number of days as your “class time.” You can ask the professor how many hours a week the class will take to help make your schedule. Then, every time you have scheduled “class time,” you’ll know to sit down and focus on that day’s requirements.

While the hours will probably fluctuate some as the semester goes on, this structure will help you stay focused and avoid falling behind.

Practice with the Tech Tools Early

If you’re good at learning new apps and navigating new websites, you probably won’t have trouble with this. Still, you should determine which tools and platforms you’ll need early, and devote an hour or two to figuring them out in the first week. If you already know how to navigate the required sites and use the right tech tools, you won’t get slowed down when class really gets underway.

Reach Out to Your Professor

As soon as you start having trouble with something in class, consider reaching out to your professor. It’s often better to address small problems now than to wait until they become big problems.

For example, if you don’t fully understand an assignment, or can’t figure out how the discussion board works, send a message right away. Most professors appreciate communicative students and will be happy to help. Your classmates can also serve as excellent resources, so consider writing a post or email to them.

Try a Handwritten Calendar

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The Complete Guide to Keeping Wine Fresh

young couple toasting with a glass of red wine
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Today, it’s easier to get a nice bottle of wine than ever before. From boutique grocery stores to wine lovers’ subscription boxes, you can quickly start stockpiling bottles faster than you can drink them.

Having a well-stocked wine selection at home is a great thing. But all that wine won’t last forever—even if you never open it. And once it’s open, a bottle of wine can seem like a ticking time bomb, turning into vinegar long before you’re ready.

However, the shelf life of wine isn’t a mystery (even though it may seem like one sometimes). Once you know how long your opened and unopened bottles will keep, you can strategize, so you never end up pouring good wine down the drain. Let’s take a closer look at the timeframe.

How Long Does Opened Wine Keep?

When you pop that cork, you introduce oxygen to the bottle. Oxygen is what causes the wine to spoil faster once it’s open.

Since wine comes in so many different varietals, there’s no solid answer as to how quickly it goes bad. The exact timing depends on the type and quality of the wine. But to give you an estimate, most opened wines will spoil in the range of two to five days. (Sparkling wines have an even shorter lifespan; they’ll go flat in about a day.)

Of course, your wine won’t go bad all at once. It will start deteriorating in quality, but at first, the difference may not be all that noticeable. So if you’re okay with a wine that’s lost some of its aroma and taste, you can get more time out of that opened bottle. But once it takes on a brownish color or an unpleasant smell, it’s no longer worth drinking at all.

How to Make Opened Wine Last Longer

There’s good news, though: you can make those opened bottles last a bit longer with these tips. Here’s how to extend the life of your wine past the two-to-five-days mark.

Use the Fridge and Cork

When you have a half-open wine bottle, your first instinct is probably to cork it and put it in the fridge for later. And that’s exactly the right thing to do.

RELATED: Chilling Your Wine in the Fridge Overnight? You’re Doing It Wrong

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Work Better While Traveling with These Tips

Business man walking in front of an airport while checking his phone
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Whether it’s a business trip or a working vacation, sometimes, it makes sense to mix work and travel. But while working on the go is something many people fantasize about, in reality, it can be much more complicated than working in your regular office.

However, it doesn’t have to be so hard. With the right approach, working on the go can be a great way to see new places without breaking the bank on vacation expenses. Want to get more out of your work-related travel? Try these tips.

Reduce Your Workload Temporarily

If you plan to work and travel long-term, you’ll need to balance your normal workload with your travel plans. Over time, you’ll find an on-the-go workflow that works for you.

But if you’re just taking a short trip, it’s helpful to bring your workload down a notch.

This doesn’t mean you need to work the bare minimum. However, it’s wise to avoid major projects and big deadlines when you’re on a trip. Say no to any extra responsibilities that are outside of your regular work schedule—or schedule them for after you return. Delegate tasks if you can.

Traveling can often bring unexpected delays and difficulties, and having a slightly lighter workload will ensure you have the flexibility to work with those challenges. Try to schedule your biggest projects and deadlines for at least one week before or after your trip.

Prepare for Time Zone Differences

When you’re traveling, any work calls or long-distance meetings will need to work around time zone differences. If you can’t schedule them for when you’re back home, just be aware of how the time difference might affect your schedule.

Remember that not every conversation and meeting is worth losing sleep over: sometimes, the same information can just as easily get relayed in an email.

Also, you can sometimes use time zone differences to your advantage. For example, you might be able to start your workday before your clients or coworkers get online, giving you an uninterrupted block of time that’s hard to find at home.

Stock Your Lodgings with Groceries

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Work Better While Traveling with These Tips

Business man walking in front of an airport while checking his phone
Prostock-studio/Shutterstock

Whether it’s a business trip or a working vacation, sometimes, it makes sense to mix work and travel. But while working on the go is something many people fantasize about, in reality, it can be much more complicated than working in your regular office.

However, it doesn’t have to be so hard. With the right approach, working on the go can be a great way to see new places without breaking the bank on vacation expenses. Want to get more out of your work-related travel? Try these tips.

Reduce Your Workload Temporarily

If you plan to work and travel long-term, you’ll need to balance your normal workload with your travel plans. Over time, you’ll find an on-the-go workflow that works for you.

But if you’re just taking a short trip, it’s helpful to bring your workload down a notch.

This doesn’t mean you need to work the bare minimum. However, it’s wise to avoid major projects and big deadlines when you’re on a trip. Say no to any extra responsibilities that are outside of your regular work schedule—or schedule them for after you return. Delegate tasks if you can.

Traveling can often bring unexpected delays and difficulties, and having a slightly lighter workload will ensure you have the flexibility to work with those challenges. Try to schedule your biggest projects and deadlines for at least one week before or after your trip.

Prepare for Time Zone Differences

When you’re traveling, any work calls or long-distance meetings will need to work around time zone differences. If you can’t schedule them for when you’re back home, just be aware of how the time difference might affect your schedule.

Remember that not every conversation and meeting is worth losing sleep over: sometimes, the same information can just as easily get relayed in an email.

Also, you can sometimes use time zone differences to your advantage. For example, you might be able to start your workday before your clients or coworkers get online, giving you an uninterrupted block of time that’s hard to find at home.

Stock Your Lodgings with Groceries

Read the remaining 17 paragraphs

The Essential Guide to Getting Stuff Done at the Airport

woman working in airport waiting area
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Working in an airport isn’t the most ideal situation, but if you’re a business traveler you know all too well how setting up virtual office there is necessary sometimes. Here’s how to get more done.

Ah, the airport—a space we all seem to be in a love-hate relationship with. It offers nice things: wine bars, cute restaurants, and fancy stuff at the duty-free store. But it also has drawbacks: security, crowds, and confusing layouts that seem designed to make you miss your flight.

And anyone who has spent lots of time in airports has probably faced the greatest airport love-hate relationship of all: that of trying to get stuff done.

On the one hand, airports offer large swathes of time, free Wi-Fi, and multiple sources for coffee refills. On the other hand, you’re often tired, stressed, and easily distracted by the swarms of people around you.

Is the airport a great place to work, or is it a remote-work hellscape? The answer can be a little bit of both, depending on the moment—but you can make your time there more productive without sacrificing your sanity. Here’s what you should know.

How Much Can You Really Get Done at the Airport?

The first step to getting stuff done at the airport: manage your expectations.

Anyone can accomplish things at the airport, whether you’re a full-time remote worker or just someone with emails to reply to and online shopping to do. However, you need to be realistic about what you can accomplish there.

As a frequent traveler with a long layover, for example, you might feel like it’s reasonable to put in a full day’s work at the airport. However, very few people can work in an airport with the same level of focus and stamina that they can elsewhere. This isn’t the time to tackle a full normal workday or aim for inbox zero.

For one thing, you’re surrounded by distractions: loud children, noisy announcements, and the hustle of people going by will make it hard to immerse yourself in work. And for another, the airport offers countless variables that could make things even harder.

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