How to Restrict Data in Google Sheets with Data Validation

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If you use Google Sheets to collaborate with others, you can prevent people from typing the wrong data in your spreadsheet’s cells. Data validation stops users from inserting anything other than properly-formatted data within specific ranges. Here’s how to use it.

RELATED: How to Create Shareable Download Links for Files on Google Drive

How to Use Data Validation in Google Sheets

Fire up your browser, head to the Google Sheets homepage, open a spreadsheet, and highlight the range you want to restrict.

Highlight all the cells to which you want to add some data validation.

Click “Data,” and then click “Data Validation.”

Click Data, and then click Data Validation.

In the data validation window that opens, click the drop-down menu beside “Criteria.” Here, you can set a specific type of input to allow for the selected cells. For the row we’ve selected, we’re going to make sure people put in a four-digit number for the year a movie was released, so select the “Number” option. You can also select other criteria, such as text only, dates, a pre-defined list of options, items from the specified range, or your custom validation formula.

Click the drop-down menu next to "Criteria" and select the form of validation you want to use.

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How to Enable/Disable Multiple File Downloads in Chrome

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By default, Google Chrome asks for confirmation when a site tries automatically to download files in succession. However, if you want to block all attempts regardless of the site, or maybe you would rather blacklist a specific website, here’s how.

Sometimes when you download a file in a browser, the website will try to download another file immediately after the first finishes. While there are legitimate circumstances—like a file conversion site—there are sites who used it maliciously to force virus or harmful scripts to download without your knowledge or permission. However, for security reasons, Google Chrome now prompts you when a website tries to download multiple files.

How to Disable Multiple Automatic File Downloads

Fire up Chrome, click the menu icon, and then click “Settings.” Alternatively, you can type chrome://settings/ into the Omnibox to go directly there.

Click the menu button, and then click Settings

Once in the Settings tab, scroll down to the bottom and click “Advanced.”

Under Settings, click Advanced at the bottom of the page.

Scroll down to the Privacy and Security section and click on “Site Settings.”

Click on Site Settings

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How to Create, View, and Edit Bookmarks in Google Chrome

The "Edit bookmark" screen in Chrome.

Bookmarks in Google Chrome save a link to a website you want to return to later, much like when you put a bookmark in a book. Here are several ways you can create, view, and edit your Bookmarks.

How to Create a Bookmark

Fire up Chrome, head to a website, and then click the star icon in the Omnibox. Here, you can change the name of the Bookmark and designate a specific folder, but we’ll leave that alone for now. Click “Done.”

Click the star icon in the Omnibox, and then click Done

Repeat this step for all your favorite sites.

When you save a page as a Bookmark, Google Chrome not only remembers that page for you, but it also uses it when you start to type something into the Omnibox. For example, type the first few letters in the title of a saved page into the address bar—like, “How” for How-to Geek’s website. Notice how Chrome suggests the page that matches what you typed in the Omnibox.

Type a portion of a Bookmark's title in to show it in the Omnibox search results.

Also, if you’re signed into the same Google account on Chrome that you use on any other devices, you can see all your Bookmarks synced from those devices.

RELATED: How to Choose What Information to Sync in Chrome

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How to Open RAW Image Files on Windows 10

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Windows 10 finally has built-in support for RAW images, thanks to the May 2019 Update. You’ll just need to install an extension from the Store. There are other solutions for opening RAW files on older versions of Windows, too.

RELATED: What is Camera Raw, and Why Would a Professional Prefer it to JPG?

Windows 10: Download the RAW Images Extension

To install and use the RAW Image Extension, you must be using the Windows 10 May 2019 Update (version 1903 or later). If you’re unable to install the extension, you will have to install the update from the Settings app or download it manually from Microsoft’s website.

RELATED: Everything New in Windows 10’s May 2019 Update, Available Now

The codec for this free extension is brought to you by the people at libraw.org and doesn’t support every format of RAW images yet. To see if yours are compatible with this extension, check out the project’s website for an up-to-date list of supported cameras. The RAW Image Extension enables viewing images in the Photos app as well as thumbnails, previews, metadata of RAW images in File Explorer. You can open a RAW file’s properties window to see the metadata.

Head to the Microsoft Store and search for “Raw Images Extension,” or go directly to the Raw Image Extension page. Click “Get” to install it.

Click Get

Now click “Install” to install the extension.

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How to Download a Windows 10 ISO Without the Media Creation Tool

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Microsoft makes Windows 10 ISO images available to everyone through its download website, but if you’re already using a Windows machine, it forces you to download the Media Creation Tool first. Here’s how to download Windows ISOs without the creation tool.

RELATED: What Is An ISO File (And How Do I Use Them)?

Microsoft’s Media Creation Tool is only for Windows. If you access the website from another operating system—like macOS or Linux—you’re sent to a page where you can directly download an ISO file instead. To get those direct ISO file downloads on Windows, you’ll need to make your web browser pretend you’re using another operating system. This requires spoofing your browser’s user agent.

The browser’s user agent is a short string of text that tells a website which OS and browser you’re using. If something on the website isn’t compatible with your setup, the site can serve you a different page. If you spoof the user agent, you can access a site that claims it’s incompatible with your system. To get to the direct ISO file downloads, your browser will claim it’s on a non-Windows operating system.

This trick works in most browsers, but we’ll be using Google Chrome for this guide. If you’re using Firefox, Edge, or Safari, you can follow along with our guide to spoof your user agent without installing an extension.

RELATED: How to Change Your Browser’s User Agent Without Installing Any Extensions

How to Download a Windows 10 ISO Image File

To get started, open Chrome and head to the Microsoft Windows download website.

Click the three dots at the top of your Chrome browser, and then select More Tools > Developer Tools. Alternatively, you can press Ctrl+Shift+I on the keyboard.

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