How to use Gnome System Monitor on Linux

Gnome System Monitor is an excellent system management application for the Linux desktop. It’s simple and easy to use. For this reason, it’s one of the most popular system monitoring tools in the Linux community. Here’s how to use it on your system. 

Gnome System Monitor on Linux

Installing Gnome System Monitor 

While mainly intended for use on the Gnome Desktop, the Gnome System Monitor works on all GTK-based Linux desktop environments. If you plan to use Gnome System Monitor on a desktop other than Gnome, you’ll need to install the app manually.

There are two ways to install Gnome System Monitor on Linux. If you’re using Gnome Software on your GTK desktop, you can get it that way. It is also possible to install it via the command-line terminal. This guide will cover both methods of setting up the app.

Gnome Software

To install Gnome System Monitor via Gnome Software, start by launching the Gnome Software application on the desktop. You can launch it by searching for “Software” in the app menu.

Once Gnome Software is open, find the search button in the top-left corner of the screen and click on it. After clicking on it, type in “Gnome System Monitor” and press the Enter key to view the search results.

In the search results, find “GNOME System Monitor” and click on it to go to the app’s Gnome Software page.

On the Gnome System Monitor page, find the “Install” button and click on it. Then, enter your password and allow the app to install. Once it is installed, click “Launch” to open up the app.

Terminal

If you don’t use Gnome Software but still want to install Gnome System Monitor on your computer, you can install it via the terminal command-line. First, open up a terminal on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard.

Once the terminal window is open, follow along with the command-line installation instructions outlined below that corresponds with the Linux distribution you are currently using. 

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, you’ll be able to install Gnome System Monitor by making use of the following Apt command below.

sudo apt install gnome-system-monitor

Debian

Those on Debian Linux can install the Gnome System Monitor by making use of the Apt-get command below.

sudo apt-get install gnome-system-monitor

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, the Gnome System Monitor application is installable by making use of the Pacman command.

sudo pacman -S gnome-system-monitor

Fedora

Fedora Linux users can get the Gnome System Monitor application up and running by making use of the Dnf command.

sudo dnf install gnome-system-monitor

OpenSUSE

Are you using OpenSUSE Linux? Get Gnome System Monitor up and running by making use of the Zypper command.

sudo zypper install gnome-system-monitor'
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Snap

Gnome System Monitor is available as a Snap package for those who are interested. To get it set up, ensure you have the Snap runtime working on your computer. After that, use the command below to get it working.

sudo snap install gnome-system-monitor

How to use Gnome System Monitor on Linux

To use the Gnome System Monitor on Linux, start by opening up the app menu and searching for “Gnome System Monitor.” Once you’ve found it, click on it to start it up. Alternatively, you can launch it by typing out “gnome-system-monitor” in a terminal window. 

Once the Gnome System Monitor application is open on your computer screen, follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to use the app.

Step 1: Find the “Processes” tab in Gnome System Monitor, and click on it with the mouse. In this tab, you’ll see an overview of all running processes on your Linux PC. 

Step 2: Once inside the “Processes” tab, look through the running processes list until you see a process you wish to stop running. Gnome System Monitor only shows running processes for your user account. 

If you cannot find the process you wish to stop running, find the search button at the top right-hand corner of the app, click on it. Then, use it to search for your running process.

Step 3: When you’ve found your running process in Gnome System Monitor, right-click on it with the mouse. Once you’ve right-clicked on it, then right-click menu will appear. 

Step 4: Inside the right-click menu, locate the “End” option and select it. This option will end the process.

Alternatively, if selecting “End” doesn’t stop Gnome System Monitor’s process, try selecting the “Kill” option to kill the process.

Monitoring

While the main draw to Gnome System Monitor is its ability to manage running processes, that’s not all it does. You can also monitor your hardware with it. To view information on CPU performance, memory usage, or network usage, select the “Resources” tab. Or, click “File Systems” to view file system usage information.

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How to install the Evolution RSS reader plugin on Linux

Ever wanted to catch up with your favorite RSS feeds in the Evolution email client? Thanks to the Evolution RSS reader plugin, you can! It adds RSS functionality that you can use to catch up on your favorite RSS feed items. Here’s how to set it up.

Evolution RSS reader plugin

Installing Evolution email on Linux

The Evolution RSS reader plugin needs the Evolution email client to function. For this reason, we’ll need to go over how to install the Evolution email client on your computer.

Evolution is available for most Linux operating systems. To start the installation of the Evolution email client on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window. You can open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, open up the app menu and search for “terminal.”

Once the terminal window is open, follow along with the command-line installation instructions outlined below that correspond with the Linux operating system you currently use.

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, the Evolution application can be easily installed by making use of the Apt command below.

sudo apt install evolution

Debian

If you’re using Debian, you can get Evolution set up on your system by making use of the Apt-get command below.

sudo apt-get install evolution

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, the Evolution email client is installable via the Pacman command.

sudo pacman -S evolution 

Fedora

If you’re using Fedora Linux, the dnf command can be used to install the Evolution app.

sudo dnf install evolution

OpenSUSE

To get Evolution up and running on OpenSUSE, make use of the following Zypper command.

sudo zypper install evolution

Installing Evolution RSS reader plugin on Linux

The Evolution email client is now installed. However, just installing the email client isn’t enough, as the Evolution RSS plugin doesn’t come with it. To get the Evolution RSS plugin working, you’ll need to set up the plugin manually.

To set up the Evolution RSS plugin on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop. You can launch a terminal window on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “terminal” in the app menu to open it that way.

Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, follow along with the installation instructions below that match your Linux OS to get the Evolution RSS plugin set up on your computer. 

Ubuntu 

On Ubuntu, the Evolution RSS plugin is available for installation on every version of Ubuntu starting at 16.04, all the way to 20.10. To install the plugin, make use of the apt install command below.

sudo apt install evolution-rss

Debian

On Debian Linux, from Debian 9 to Debian 10, 11, and Sid, you can get the Evolution RSS plugin working from the “Main” software repository. To install it, use the Apt-get command below.

sudo apt-get install evolution-rss

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, you can get the Evolution RSS plugin up and running on your system through the “Community” software repository. To start the installation, ensure you have “Community” enabled. After that, make use of the Pacman command.

sudo pacman -S evolution-rss

Fedora

On Fedora 32, 33, and Fedora Rawhide, the Evolution RSS plugin is available for installation. To set it up on your computer, make use of the following Dnf command below.

sudo dnf install evolution-rss

OpenSUSE

On OpenSUSE, the official software repositories do not support the Evolution RSS plugin. However, it is possible to install the plugin through a third-party repository. To get it working, head over to the OpenSUSE Build Service, select your distribution and install it.

How to use the Evolution RSS plugin 

To use the Evolution RSS plugin, start up the Evolution email client. Once it’s open, use the startup wizard to configure your email account if you haven’t already. You’ll need to have your email account set up in Evolution to use this plugin.

Once you’ve gotten your email account configured in the Evolution email app, find the “Edit” menu and click on it with the mouse. After selecting the “Edit” button with the mouse, look for the “Preferences” option, and click on it with the mouse.

Inside the “Preferences” window, there are several options to choose from. Look to the very bottom for “News and Blogs” and select it with the mouse. “News and Blogs” is the Evolution RSS configuration area.

In “News and Blogs,” find the “Add” button and click on it to add a new feed. Repeat this process till all feeds are added to the Evolution mail app.

When you’ve added all RSS feeds to Evolution, you’ll start seeing RSS items pop up in the “News and Blogs” section of the sidebar in Evolution. To read any RSS item, click on “News and Blogs,” followed by the feed.

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How to install qt 5 on Ubuntu

Are you an Ubuntu Linux user and developer that needs Qt 5 installed on your system? Can’t figure out what packages to install to use it? We can help! Follow along with this guide as we go over how to install Qt 5 on Linux!

install qt 5 on Ubuntu

Install Qt 5 on Ubuntu via official software repositories – terminal

If you’re using Ubuntu, the best way to get Qt 5 up and running on your system is through the official Ubuntu software repositories. To start the installation process, you must open up a terminal window. 

To open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu Linux desktop, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Alternatively, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and open it up that way.

Once the terminal window is open on the Ubuntu desktop, the installation can begin. Using the apt install command, set up the “qt5-default” package on your computer. 

sudo apt install qt5-default

After typing in the apt install command above, Ubuntu will ask you for your password. The reason it is asking for your password is that sudo requires a password. Type in your user password and press the Enter key. Do not worry if you do not see any password feedback.

If your password was entered successfully, the terminal should accept it and attempt to collect all dependencies required for the “qt5-default” package on your system. Once all dependencies are collected, press the button to continue with the installation. 

The installation of Qt 5 using the official Ubuntu software sources should be quick, as only a handful of things need to be downloaded and installed on your system. For more information on Qt 5, check out the official documentation.

Install Qt 5 on Ubuntu via official software repositories – GUI

If you’d prefer to set up Qt 5 on your Ubuntu PC using the GUI, the best way to go is with the Synaptic Package Manager. It’s an excellent application that gives Ubuntu users the ability to search and install packages without touching the terminal.

Sadly, Synaptic doesn’t come pre-installed on Ubuntu systems anymore. To get it working, open up Ubuntu Software, search for “Synaptic,” and install it. Once you’ve got it working, open it via the app menu.

With Synaptic Package Manager open, look for the “Search” button in the top-right section of the app, and click on it with the mouse. Then, click on the text box next to “Search” and type out “qt5-default”.

After typing out your search term, find the “search” button inside of the pop-up window and click it to perform a search of the Ubuntu software repositories. The search should not take long.

Look through the search results for “qt5-default,” and right-click on it with the mouse. Inside the right-click menu, look for the option “Mark for installation” and select it.

Now that the “qt5-default” package is marked for installation in Synaptic Package Manager locate the “Apply” button and select it with the mouse. When you click “Apply,” Synaptic will attempt to download and install Qt 5 on your Ubuntu PC.

The installation shouldn’t take too long. When the process is complete, close Synaptic Package Manager as it is no longer necessary. For more information on Qt 5 for Linux, check the documentation.

Install Qt 5 on Ubuntu via the Qt website

While it is highly recommended to install Qt 5 on Ubuntu using Ubuntu’s official packages, it is also possible to download Qt 5 from the website and install it that way.

To start the installation of Qt 5 via the official website, open up a terminal window. You can open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu desktop with Ctrl + Alt + T or search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open, make use of the wget command to download the latest Qt 5 from the website.

wget https://download.qt.io/official_releases/qt/5.12/5.12.10/qt-opensource-linux-x64-5.12.10.run

After downloading Qt 5, you must update the permissions of the file so that it can be executed as a program.

sudo chmod +x qt-opensource-linux-x64-5.12.10.run

Execute the Qt 5 run file to start the installation. 

./qt-opensource-linux-x64-5.12.10.run

Following the installation of the Qt 5 run file, you must install various dependencies. These dependencies are required for Qt 5 to run correctly on Ubuntu. 

sudo apt install libfontconfig1 build-essential mesa-common-dev libglu1-mesa-dev

After installing all of these dependencies, you will need to create a desktop entry for Ubuntu. To do this, enter the commands below.

touch ~/.local/share/applications/Qt-Creator.desktop

echo "[Desktop Entry] Version=1.0 Encoding=UTF-8 Type=Application Name=QtCreator Comment=QtCreator NoDsiplay=true Exec=(Install folder of QT)/Tools/QtCreator/bin/qtcreator %f Icon=(Install folder of QT)/5.4/Src/qtdoc/doc/images/landing/icon_QtCreator_78x78px.png Name[en_US]=Qt-Creator" > ~/.local/share/applicationsQt-Creator.desktop

Update the permissions of the Qt Creator file with chmod.

sudo chmod +x ~/.local/share/applicationsQt-Creator.desktop

Make Qt the default file association for pro files on Ubuntu using echo.

echo "text/qtcreator=Qt-Creator.desktop;" >> ~/.local/share/applications/defaults.list

After adding the file association, everything should work.

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How to install GCC on Ubuntu

Need to install GCC on your Ubuntu system but can’t figure out how to set it up? If so, this guide is for you! Follow along below as we show you how to install GCC on Ubuntu!

 install GCC on Ubuntu

Install GCC on Ubuntu – Terminal

The GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) is installable on Ubuntu through the command-line terminal. To install it, you will need to download and set up the “build-essential” package on Ubuntu. To start the installation process, open up a terminal window. 

To open up a terminal window on the desktop, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, open up the app menu and search for “Terminal” to open it up. 

Once the terminal window is open, make use of the apt install command below and use it to install the “build-essential” package on Ubuntu. 

sudo apt install build-essential

After entering the command above, Ubuntu will ask you for your password. Your password is requested due to the sudo command. This command allows users to execute a single command as root. To continue, enter your user password.

Note: while entering your password with sudo, you will not see any password feedback. If this bothers you, please follow along with our guide on how to turn on password feedback.

When you’ve entered your password, the terminal prompt will collect all dependencies related to the “build-essential” package. From there, Ubuntu will ask you if you want to install the package. Press the Y key to continue.

Once the key is pressed, Ubuntu will start installing GCC on your computer. This process shouldn’t take long at all. When the process is complete, you can view the GCC manual with the man gcc command.

Installing multiple versions of GCC – Terminal

While installing the “build-essential” package on Ubuntu is good enough for most Ubuntu users, as it is GCC 10, it’s not the only version of GCC you can install. If you’d like to install multiple versions of GCC on Ubuntu, you can. Here’s how.

First, open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu desktop. Once it is open, use the apt search command to search the available GCC packages in the Ubuntu software repositories.

apt search gcc

Look through the prompt and find the version of GCC you’d like to install on Ubuntu. As of now, it is possible to install GCC 7, GCC 8, 9, and 10 (which is installed via the “build-essential” package).

Note: can’t find the GCC version you want through the apt search results? 

Once you’ve located the version of GCC you’d like to install on your Ubuntu PC, install it using the apt install commands below. GCC packages are gcc-7, gcc-8, gcc-9, and gcc-10.

To install GCC version 7 on Ubuntu, install both the gcc-7 and g++-7 packages. 

sudo apt install gcc-7 g++-7

To install the GCC version 8 on Ubuntu, install both the gcc-8 and g++-8 packages.

sudo apt install gcc-8 g++-8

Need to get GCC version 9 on your computer? Install the gcc-9 and g++-9 packages.

sudo apt install gcc-9 g++-9

While it’s highly recommended you install the “build-essential” package to get GCC 10 working on Ubuntu, that’s not the only way to install it on your computer. You can also install GCC 10 by installing the gcc-10 and g++-10 packages.

sudo apt install gcc-10 g++-10 

Install GCC on Ubuntu – Synaptic Package Manager

If you need to get GCC working on Ubuntu but don’t want to use the terminal, you can do it with the Synaptic Package Manager. To start, ensure you have Synaptic installed. To install Synaptic, open up the Ubuntu Software app, search for “Synaptic,” and install it.

Once the Synaptic Package Manager is installed, open it by searching for it in the app menu. Then, locate the search button in the top-right corner of the screen. After selecting the Synaptic search button, type out “build-essential” and press the Enter key to view the search results. 

Look through the search results in Synaptic for “build-essential.” When you’ve found it, right-click on it with the mouse and select the “Mark for installation” button to mark the “build-essential” package for installation in Synaptic.

Find the “Apply” button in Synaptic, and click on it to start the installation of GCC on Ubuntu.

Installing multiple versions of GCC – Synaptic Package Manager

Need to install a different GCC version to Ubuntu rather than the one provided with the “build-essential” package? Do the following. First, open up Synaptic Package Manager.

Once Synaptic is open, find the search button, and click on it with the mouse. Then, choose one of the packages listed below and type them into the search box.

  • GCC 7: gcc-7, g++-7
  • GCC 8: gcc-8, g++-8
  • GCC 9: gcc-9, g++-9
  • GCC 10: gcc-10, g++-10

Right-click on the GCC package(s) you’ve searched for in Synaptic, and select the “Apply” button to install it. Repeat this process to install as many versions of GCC to Ubuntu as desired.

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How to run Ubuntu from USB

If you’re looking to run Ubuntu from a USB flash drive, you’ll be happy to know that there are many ways to run Ubuntu from USB. You can take traditional Ubuntu and install it to a USB flash drive, though the OS isn’t built for that and will probably be slow. You can also take a distribution that uses Ubuntu as a core but is designed for a USB flash drive.

In this guide, we’ll focus on Puppy Linux’s Ubuntu release. The reason for this is that Puppy is specifically designed to run off of a USB flash drive and already has persistent storage set up. It’s much easier to figure out for the average user. 

run Ubuntu from USB

To get started, be sure you have a 32 GB (or larger) USB flash drive. A large drive like this will enable you to get the most out of storage and performance. 

Downloading Puppy Linux ISO

Puppy Linux, like all Linux operating systems, is distributed via an ISO file via the internet. You will need to download this ISO file to your computer and flash it to a USB flash drive to use it.

To get your hands on the Ubuntu version of Puppy Linux, head over to the Puppy Linux website. Once on the website, click on the “Download” icon. After clicking on the “Download” icon, locate “Ubuntu Focal 64”. This is Ubuntu 20.04 LTS but specially designed to run on your USB flash drive.

Original download link for “Ubuntu Focal 64” not working? Try clicking on “Mirror.” It provides an alternative download link to the primary download option. 

Want to download Puppy Linux to your computer through the terminal? Open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard and execute the command below.

wget http://distro.ibiblio.org/puppylinux/puppy-fossa/fossapup64-9.5.iso -O ~/Downloads/fossapup64-9.5.iso

The download will not take long to complete. When the download process is complete, move on to the next section of the guide.

Creating Puppy Linux USB installation

Puppy Linux needs to be flashed to your USB flash drive before it can be used. There are many ways to flash an ISO USB file. This guide focuses on the Etcher USB/SD Card creation tool as it is easy to use and cross-platform.

To start the process, you must install Etcher on your computer. To install Etcher, head over to Etcher.io and download the latest release for your computer. Then, extract it from the ZIP archive and double-click on the AppImage file to open it up.

Once Etcher is open, plug in your USB flash drive. From there, look for the “Flash from file” button, and click on it with the mouse. Then, locate the Puppy Linux ISO file you downloaded, and select it to add it to Etcher.

After adding the Puppy Linux ISO file to Etcher, locate the “Select Target” button, and click on it with the mouse. Then, use the UI to select your USB flash drive. 

When the ISO is loaded, and your USB flash drive is selected, click on the “Flash!” button to start up the process of flashing the ISO file to USB. When the process is complete, leave the USB plugged in and turn off the computer.

How to run Ubuntu from USB

To run Ubuntu from USB, you’ll need to choose a boot mode in the Ubuntu version of Puppy Linux. To do that, plug in the USB stick with Puppy Linux Ubuntu installed onto it and boot it up.

Once the PC is booted up, access your BIOS. You will need to access your BIOS to change the boot order so that it will load up the USB stick with Puppy Linux Ubuntu installed.

After you’ve configured your BIOS to boot from USB, save the changes, and exit the BIOS. On most BIOS systems, changes can be saved by pressing F10 on the keyboard. 

When the PC starts booting Puppy Linux Ubuntu from USB, you will see a boot screen. This boot screen is large and has tons of options to choose from, including “Copy SFS files to RAM,” “Don’t copy SFS files to RAM,” “No X,” etc. Select the option that works best for your needs.

Note: unsure about what option to choose for when booting? Select “Copy SFS files to RAM” for best results. 

With the boot option selected, Puppy Linux Ubuntu will begin to load up the desktop. From here, you’ll see the “Quick Setup” window. You can configure your country, timezone, keyboard layout, screen resolution, and more in this window. 

After going through the “Quick Setup,” you’ll be free to use a full-fledged, lightweight Ubuntu desktop right from your USB stick! Enjoy!

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