How to play 7 days to die on Linux

7 days to die is an early access survival horror video game. It is set in an open world and has many survival elements similar to games like Minecraft. In this guide, we’ll show you how to play it on your Linux system!

7 days to die on Linux

7 days to die on Linux

7 Days to die works pretty well on Linux as it is a native application, but you can only play this game with Steam. Steam. As a result, we must go over how to install the Linux version of Steam.

Install Steam

To get Steam installed on your Linux PC, start by opening up a terminal window. You can open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Alternatively, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and launch the program that way.

Once the terminal window is is open and ready to use, the installation of Steam can begin. Follow the installation instructions outlined below that corresponds with the Linux OS you use on your system. 

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, the Steam application is installable through the primary Ubuntu software sources. To install it on your system, use the following Apt command.

sudo apt install steam

Debian

To get Steam working on Debian Linux, you will need to download the DEB package from the internet manually. To download the DEB package, make use of the following wget download command below.

wget https://steamcdn-a.akamaihd.net/client/installer/steam.deb

Now that the Steam DEB package is done downloading on your Linux PC, the installation of Steam can begin. Using the dpkg command below, install the latest release of Steam.

sudo dpkg -i steam.deb

After the Steam DEB package is done installing on your Debian Linux PC is complete, you will need to correct any dependencies that appeared during the installation. To correct these dependencies, enter the command below.

sudo apt-get install -f

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, the Steam application is installable to all users via the “Multilib” software repository. To enable this repo on your system, open up /etc/Pacman.conf, scroll down, find “multilib,” and remove all # symbols from it as well as the lines directly below.

Once you’ve enabled “multilib,” update your system. Then, enter the command below to install Steam on Arch.

sudo pacman -S steam

Fedora/OpenSUSE

Steam works on both Fedora and OpenSUSE. If you’d like to install them on your system, you can do so using their respective package managers. However, we highly suggest using the Flatpak release of Steam instead.

Flatpak

To get Steam working as a Flatpak on your Linux PC, you’ll first need to enable the Steam runtime on your computer. To enable the Steam runtime, head over to our guide on how to setup Flatpak on Linux.

Once the Flatpak app is installed, you can install the Flatpak release of Steam on your system by entering the two commands below in a terminal window.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo
flatpak install flathub com.valvesoftware.Steam

Play 7 Days to Die on Linux

With Steam installed, launch it on the desktop and log into your account. After logging in, follow the instructions below to play 7 Days to Die on Linux!

Step 1: First, find the “Store” button at the top of Steam, and click on it with the mouse. Upon selecting the “Store” button, you will see the Steam Storefront load up.

In the Steam Storefront, find the search box, and type in “7 Days to Die.” Then, press the Enter key on the keyboard to view the search results.

Step 2: Sort through the search results for “7 Days to Die” and click on the game once you’ve found it. By clicking on the game in the search results, you’ll be taken to the 7 Days to Die Steam Storefront page.

Step 3: On the 7 Days to Die Steam Storefront page, look for the green “Add to cart” button, and click on it to buy the game and add it to your account. After that, find the “Library” button, and click on it to return to your Steam games library.

Step 4: Inside your Steam games library, locate 7 Days to Die. Once you’ve found it, click on it in the sidebar. By clicking on 7 Days to Die, you’ll access the game’s Steam library page.

Inside of the 7 Days to Die Steam library page, locate the blue “INSTALL” button, and click on it. By selecting this button, Steam will begin to download and install the game on your computer. 

Step 5: When the download of 7 Days to Die is complete, the blue “INSTALL” button will become a green “PLAY” button. Select this “PLAY” button to start up the game.

Troubleshooting

7 Days to Die is a native Linux game. Still, if you have issues, or maybe want to try out the Proton release of the game on your system, do yourself a favor and check out the ProtonDB page for 7 Days to Die.

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How to use bash to create directories in Linux [Guide]

If you need to use the bash terminal to create directories on Linux, the best way to do it is with the mkdir command. What is “mkdir?” It stands for “make directory,” and it’s one of the most valuable tools on all of Linux. With it, you can create folders anywhere on Linux.

There’s no need to install “mkdir” to use it on your computer. In fact, it comes pre-installed on every single Linux operating system out there today. A Linux OS probably couldn’t function without it!

bash to create directories

Use bash to create directories – Mkdir 

To create a directory on your Linux PC with the mkdir command, you will need to open up a terminal window. To open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, execute the mkdir command below to create a new folder. For example, to make a new folder in the “home” directory (~/), you’d do the following.

Note: feel free to change (~/) to wherever you’d like to create the new folder.

mkdir ~/my_new_folder

It is also possible to use mkdir to create multiple directories at the same time in bash. For example, to create 4 folders with the names “folder_1,” “folder_2,” “folder_3,” and “folder_4,” you’d execute the following command.

mkdir folder_1 folder_2 folder_3 folder_4

To specify the locations of each of the new folders, simply add in the paths. For example, to create folder_1 in ~/, folder_2 in ~/Documents, folder_3 in ~/Desktop, and folder_4 in ~/Videos, do the following.

Note: be sure to change each of the folders’ locations to suit your own needs if you want to create multiple folders in different areas with a single command. Additionally, be sure to change the names of the folders in the command, as they are just example names.

mkdir ~/folder_1 ~/Documents/folder_2 ~/Desktop/folder_3 ~/Videos/folder_4

To delete any of your newly created folders, you can use the rm command. For example, to delete “folder_1” from the home directory (~/), enter the following command.

rm -rf ~/folder_1

For more info on how to use the mkdir command to create folders using the bash Linux terminal, execute the man mkdir command below.

man mkdir

Use bash to create directories – NNN

While the mkdir command is excellent, it isn’t the only way Linux users can create new folders using the bash terminal. It is possible to make new folders using the NNN terminal-based file manager. Here’s how.

First, you must install the NNN terminal file manager. To install it, open up a terminal window by using the Ctrl + Alt + T keyboard combination or by searching for “terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, follow the installation instructions below to get NNN working. 

Ubuntu

To get NNN on Ubuntu, use the Apt command.

sudo apt install nnn

Debian

To get NNN on Debian, use Apt-get.

sudo apt-get install nnn

Arch Linux 

On Arch Linux, install NNN with Pacman.

sudo pacman -S nnn

Fedora

To get NNN working on Fedora, use Dnf.

sudo dnf install nnn

OpenSUSE

On OpenSUSE, NNN is installable via Zypper.

sudo zypper install nnn

Once the NNN app is installed on your computer, use the nnn command to start up the file browser. Then, use the step-by-step instructions below to use NNN to create new folders.

Step 1: In NNN, select the folder you wish to create a folder inside of. For example, to create a folder (with NNN) in the “Documents” folder, you’d select “Documents” in NNN using the Arrow keys and Enter key to select.

Step 2: Once inside the directory in which you are creating a folder, press the key on the keyboard. By pressing on the keyboard, you will see the following message.

'f'ile / 'd' ir / 's'ym / 'h' ard

This message lets you know your choices when pressing the key on the keyboard. “f” for file, “d” for dir (AKA folder), “s” for symlink, and “h” for a hard link. 

Step 3: Press the D key on the keyboard to tell the NNN file manager you want to create a new directory using the NNN file manager. After pressing the key, you will see another message in NNN. 

[path/]name

Type in the name of the folder into the text box. Then, press the Enter key on the keyboard to confirm it. After pressing Enter, you will see your newly created folder in NNN.

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Ubuntu: VMware Workstation 16 download and setup [Guide]

Do you need to get VMware Workstation Pro 16 working on your Ubuntu PC but don’t know how to do it? We can help! Follow along with this guide as we show you how to install VMware Workstation Pro 16 on Ubuntu.

Note: VMware Workstation Pro 16 will expire after 30 days of evaluation if you do not purchase a software license. For more information on how to purchase a software license for VMware Workstation Pro 16, click on this link here.

Ubuntu: VMware Workstation 16

Download VMware Workstation Pro 16

To install VMware Workstation Pro 16 on Ubuntu, you must first download it. The reason that downloading is required is that the app isn’t distributed directly by Ubuntu. 

To download VMware Workstation Pro 16 on your Ubuntu PC, start by heading over to the “Download VMware Workstation Pro” page on the VMware website. Once on the website, find the “Workstation 16 Pro for Linux” button.

Directly below the “Workstation 16 Pro for Linux” button, you’ll see a “Download Now” button. Click on it with the mouse. When you click on this button, the VMware Workstation Pro 16 app will download to your Ubuntu PC. 

Sit back and allow the download to complete. The file is roughly 500 MB in size, so the download process could take a bit of time, especially for those who have a slow internet connection.

When the download is complete, open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Once the terminal window is open, use the CD command to move into the “Downloads” directory.

cd ~/Downloads

Inside of the “Downloads” directory, use the chmod command to update the permissions of the newly downloaded VMware Workstation Pro 16 installer file. Permissions must be updated, or the app will not be able to install correctly on Ubuntu.

chmod +x VMware-Workstation-Full-16.*.x86_64.bundle

When the permissions are up to date, VMware Workstation Pro 16 is ready to install on Ubuntu. To start the installation, move on to the next section of the guide.

Installing VMware Workstation Pro 16 on Ubuntu

The installation of VMware Workstation Pro 16 on Ubuntu is different from other pieces of software. Unlike other apps, VMware doesn’t come as an easy-to-install DEB package, Snap, or Flatpak. Instead, users need to install a “bundle” file.

Bundle files aren’t all that hard to deal with on Linux, but new users may be intimidated by the unfamiliar file type. To start the installation, boot up the installer. To do this, execute the following command below.

sudo ./VMware-Workstation-Full-16.*.x86_64.bundle

Once the command above is run, you’ll see the terminal begin to install VMware on your computer. The installation should be quick, but it’s not the only thing you have to do to get the app working on Ubuntu.

After running the terminal installer, press the Win key on the keyboard in Ubuntu to open up the search box. In the search box, type out “VMware Workstation,” and click on the app that appears with this name.

When you select the “VMware Workstation” icon, a “Welcome to VMware Workstation” GUI will appear. In this gui, you will see an “End User Licence Agreement.” Find the “I accept the terms in the license agreement,” and click on the “Next” button to continue.

After agreeing to the first agreement, you’ll see another agreement. Just like before, find the “I accept the terms in the license agreement” option, and click on the “Next” button to continue on to the next page.

Following the two agreements that VMware asks you to agree to, you’ll see “Would you like to check for product updates on startup?” Check this box if you would like to see updates to VMware Workstation Pro 16 each time you launch the app on Ubuntu. 

Past the product updates page, VMware will inform you about their “VMware Customer Experience Improvement Program”. If you would like to join this program, select the “Yes” option. If not, select “No,” and click “Next” to continue.

On the final page of the VMware Workstation Pro 16 installation GUI, you will be asked to enter a product key. At this time, enter your VMware Workstation Pro 16 product key purchased at Vmware.com, and press the “Finish” button to end the installer.

If you do not have a product key, do not worry! You can still use VMware Workstation Pro 16 on Ubuntu. Simply click on the “I want to try VMware Workstation 16 for 30 days,” and click “Finish” to close the installer.

Upon clicking on the “Finish” button, Ubuntu will ask for your password. Enter your password into the prompt and press the Enter key to continue.

After entering your password, the VMware Workstation Pro 16 app will open up on the Ubuntu desktop ready for use. Enjoy!

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Linux: replace text string in file [Guide]

Editing text files on Linux by hand can be tedious. That’s why it’s good to know how to replace text strings in files using the command line quickly. If you’re new to Linux and don’t know how to do it, we can help! Follow along as we show you how to replace a text string in a file on Linux!

Linux: replace text string

Replace text string in file – sed

The sed tool is the best way to replace a text string in a file on Linux. The reason? It’s straightforward to use and does its job very well. Sed is usually pre-installed on 99% of Linux operating systems, so there’s no need to install it to use it.

Replacing a text string in a file with Sed is done with the sed -i command. Here’s how to use it. First, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop. You can open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard.

Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, write out sed -i in the terminal prompt. This is the start of the replacement command.

sed -i

After writing out the sed -i command, add in a ‘ quote mark. This quotation mark is essential, as all text being replaced with sed -i needs to start after this mark.

sed -i '

Following the first  mark, write s/. The s/ goes directly before the existing text you wish to replace using sed.

sed -i 's/

Now that the s/ is written into the terminal command-line prompt, it is time to tell sed what text to replace in the file. In this example, we’ll replace the word “apple.” 

sed -i 's/apple

When the text we want to replace is written into the command, the next step is to write in the new text that will replace it. In this example, we’ll replace “apples” with “oranges.”

sed -i 's/apples/oranges

Once the text we want to replace is written into the command (oranges), close off the command with g/. The g/ tells sed to replace all text instances (apples) with the new text (oranges). It should look like the example below.

Note: if you do not want to replace every text in the file (apples to oranges, for example), remove the g and have it run as sed -i 's/apples/oranges/' instead.

sed -i 's/apple/orange/g'

Finally, tell sed what file the text is in that needs replacing. In this example, fruit.txt in the home directory is the target.

sed -i 's/apples/oranges/g' ~/fruit.txt

Press the enter key to execute the command and replace your text string in the file.

Replace text string in file – Perl

Another way to replace a text string in a file on Linux is with the Perl programming language. Perl is used for text processing a lot, so naturally, it can swap out text strings in files and is perfect for this use case.

To start, ensure you have Perl installed on your Linux PC. Most Linux operating systems come with Perl installed. However, if you do not have it, check your operating system’s help page for information on how to get it working.

Using Perl to replace text strings in a file requires the terminal. Open up a terminal on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and launch it that way.

Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, start by typing out perl -pe in the command-line prompt. The perl -pe command is what is needed to replace a text string in a file.

perl -pe

Upon writing out perl -pe in the terminal prompt, you will need to start with the first ‘ quote mark. This mark tells Perl where the text replacement area is in the command.

perl -pe '

Following the first ‘ quote mark, add s/, followed by the string of text you wish to replace, and another /. For example, to replace “apples” in the fruit.txt file, you’d write out the following text.

perl -pe 's/apples/

After writing out the word(s) you wish to replace, add in the word that will replace the existing text. For example, if you want to replace “apples” in “fruit.txt” with “oranges,” add in “oranges” after perl -pe 's/apples/ so it looks like perl -pe 's/apples/oranges/.

perl -pe 's/apples/oranges/

Once both strings of text are in the command, you’ll need to specify the input file that Perl uses. For example, if you want to replace text in the “fruit.txt” file, you’ll need to specify it in the command.

Note: in this example, the “fruit.txt” file is in the home directory (~/). Be sure to replace “~/fruit.txt” with your text file’s location for the command to work.

perl -pe 's/apples/oranges/' ~/fruit.txt

Now that the input file (the file you’re modifying with Perl) is added to the command, the command should look like it does below.

perl -pe 's/apples/oranges/' ~/fruit.txt > /tmp/output.txt;cat /tmp/output.txt > ~/fruit.txt

When the command above is run, the text string will be replaced with the new text you specified. In our example, we replaced “apples” with “oranges.” To view the changes, enter the command below.

cat fruit.txt

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Ubuntu: delete app history [Guide]

After using Ubuntu for a while, the app history builds up, slowing down your system. Thankfully, it is easy to clear this app history to speed up your system. In this guide, we’ll show you how.

Ubuntu: delete app history

Method 1 – Bleachbit

If you want to delete app history on Ubuntu, the best way to go is Bleachbit. It’s a fantastic tool that can do a deep scan of your system and erase app history. Bleachbit is open-source and works on everything from web browser app history to photo thumbnails, etc.

Installing Bleachbit on Ubuntu

Sadly, the Bleachbit application isn’t a default Ubuntu application and doesn’t come pre-installed. For this reason, you must install it before attempting to use it on your system. 

To start the installation of Bleachbit, open up the Ubuntu Software Center. To open up Ubuntu Software Center, press Win on the keyboard, search for “Ubuntu Software,” and open up the app.

Once the app is open, find the search box, type in “Bleachbit,” and press the Enter key to view the search results. Look through the search results for “Bleachbit, and click on it with the mouse.

After selecting “Bleachbit,” look for the “Install” button and click on it with the mouse. You’ll then be prompted to enter your password. Do so. When your password is entered, Bleachbit will begin installing.

Click “Launch” when done to open up the app.

Terminal installation

Don’t want to install the Bleachbit application on your Ubuntu PC using the Ubuntu Software Center? Try setting it up with the terminal. To start, launch a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard.

Once the terminal window is open, use the apt install command to install the “bleachbit” package on your computer.

sudo apt install bleachbit

Upon entering the command above, Ubuntu will ask for your password. Type it out and press the Enter key, then press to install the software.

Delete app history with Bleachbit

To delete app history on your Ubuntu PC with Bleachbit, start by launching the app. You can launch the app by searching for “Bleachbit” in your Linux desktop’s application menu.

Once the Bleachbit program is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: In Bleachbit, look to the left-hand sidebar. Once in the sidebar, look for the app history you wish to clear. For example, to clear Discord app history, select the box next to “Discord,” or for Firefox, select the box next to “Firefox,” etc.

Step 2: After selecting all apps you wish to clear, find the “Preview” button in the app’s top-left corner and click on it. When you click on “Preview,” Bleachbit will calculate the amount of space saved after deleting your app history.

Step 3: Locate the “Clean” button in the top-left hand corner of the app, and click on it. By selecting this button, Bleachbit will attempt to clear all the app’s history files (s) you selected in Step 1.

Keep in mind that the cleaning process may take some time, especially if you’ve selected apps with many files on your Linux PC. For best results, be patient and sit back and wait for everything to complete. 

When the cleaning process is complete, Bleachbit will show you what was deleted in the log on the screen. Please read it, then close the app as the process is complete.

Method 2 – Stacer

Another way to clear app history on Ubuntu is with Stacer. It’s a system optimizer and all-around helpful tool for Linux that many in the community swear by. It has a built-in cleaning app that users can use to clear app history. Here’s how to do it.

Installing Stacer on Ubuntu

Before attempting to use Stacer to clear app history on Ubuntu, you must install it. In the past, on AddictiveTips, we’ve gone over how to install the Stacer application. Follow that guide to learn how to get the app working on your Ubuntu system.

Once you’ve gotten Stacer installed on your Ubuntu PC, move on to the next section of the guide.

Delete app history with Stacer

To clear application history on Ubuntu with Stacer, open up the app by searching for it in your app menu. Once the Stacer application is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: In Stacer, look to the left-hand sidebar in the app for the broom icon, and click on it. The broom icon is the Stacer “System Cleaner” area.

Step 2: Inside the System Cleaner area, check the box next to “Application Caches” and “Application Logs”. By selecting these options, you’re telling Stacer that you want to clear your app history on Ubuntu.

Step 3: Click on the blue magnifying glass icon to start the cleaning process in Stacer. From there, check both “Application Logs” and “Application Caches” once again. Then, press the blue broom icon to clean your app history.

When the cleaning process is complete, you’ll see green text saying that your files have been cleaned. After reading the text, close Stacer as it is no longer needed.

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