How to upgrade Debian distros [Guide]

Are you using Debian and want to upgrade it to other releases like Testing, Unstable, or even Experimental, but don’t know how? We can help! Follow along as we show you how to upgrade Debian distros!

upgrade Debian distros

How to upgrade Debian distros – upgrade to Testing

One of the best things about Debian is that users can choose what type of Debian release they like. Want newer packages? Upgrade Debian Stable to Debian Testing.

If you’d like to upgrade your release of Debian Stable to Debian Testing, start by opening up a terminal window. To open up a terminal window on the Debian desktop, press Ctrl + Alt + T or search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open, use the sed command below to change over your software sources from “Stable” or “Buster” (Debian 10, the current stable release codename as of writing this) to the “Testing” codename.

sudo sed -i 's/stable/testing/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

If you have “buster” in your /etc/apt/sources.list instead of “stable,” execute the command below instead.

sudo sed -i 's/buster/testing/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

When you’ve finished changing over software sources in the /etc/apt/sources.list file, you’ll need to open up the file for editing purposes. Using the nano command below, open up the file.

sudo nano -w /etc/apt/sources.list 

Inside of Nano, locate deb http://deb.debian.org/debian/ testing-updates and delete that entire line of code. There’s no “testing” repo for security updates on Debian, but the sed command creates this line when replacing “stable” or “buster” with “testing.” Be sure also to delete deb-src http://deb.debian.org/debian/ testing-updates

After shutting off the security updates repo, save by pressing Ctrl + O and exit with Ctrl + X. Once outside of Nano, enter the commands below in succession to upgrade to Debian Testing.

sudo apt update 

sudo apt upgrade -y

sudo apt dist-upgrade -y

sudo reboot

How to upgrade Debian distros – upgrade to Unstable

If Debian Testing isn’t enough for you, you can always upgrade your Debian system to Debian Unstable. Unstable is where active Debian development occurs. Packages are updated frequently, and things are on the bleeding edge. 

Debian Unstable is an excellent distribution if you like Debian but find even Debian Testing’s packages a bit out of date. Upgrading to this version will allow you to always have the newest stuff on Debian. However, be warned, it’s not for beginners!

To upgrade from Debian Testing to Debian Unstable, open up a terminal window on the Debian desktop. To open up a terminal window, press Ctrl + Alt + T or search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open, use the sed command to change your software sources list from “testing” to “unstable.” 

sudo sed -i 's/testing/unstable/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

Alternatively, If you’re coming straight from Debian Stable to Debian Unstable, you’ll need to do the following. First, change your software sources over by using sed.

sudo sed -i 's/stable/unstable/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

If you’re using “buster” in your /etc/apt/sources.list, rather than “stable,” execute:

sudo sed -i 's/buster/unstable/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

Next, if you plan to go straight from “Stable” to “Unstable,” open up /etc/apt/sources.list in Nano with the command below and delete both deb http://deb.debian.org/debian/ unstable-updates and deb-src http://deb.debian.org/debian/ unstable-updates. Save Nano with Ctrl + O, and close Nano with Ctrl +X when done editing.

Once all software channels are changed over to “Unstable,” upgrade your system to Debian Unstable by making use of the commands below.

sudo apt update 

sudo apt upgrade -y

sudo apt dist-upgrade -y

sudo reboot

How to upgrade Debian distros – Debian Experimental

Unlike Debian Testing and Debian Unstable, Debian Experimental isn’t a complete distribution. You can’t just convert your Debian Testing or Debian Unstable system into an entirely experimental release. However, you can install packages from the Experimental repo.

To gain access to the Debian Experimental repo, start by opening up a terminal window on the Debian Linux Desktop. Once the terminal window is open, open up your Debian sources list in the Nano text editor.

WARNING: Debian Experimental packages are in a pre-alpha state. They are incredibly unstable. Only use Debian Experimental if you are familiar with Debian and know how to fix it!

sudo nano -w /etc/apt/sources.list 

Inside the Nano text editor, add the following line of code. This line of code will enable you to access the Debian Experimental software repository. 

deb http://deb.debian.org/debian experimental main

After adding the line of code to your sources list in Debian, press the Ctrl + O keyboard combination to save the edits. Then, use the Ctrl + X button to exit the Nano editor.

Once you’ve closed the Nano text editor, type in sudo apt update in the terminal. This command will refresh Debian’s software sources and add the new “Experimental” packages to the package database.

sudo apt update

When everything is up to date, you’ll be able to install Debian Experimental packages by using the following command.

sudo apt -t experimental install packagename

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How to install Anaconda on Ubuntu

Anaconda is a Python-based data science platform. It comes in various editions, is open source, and installable on most Linux operating systems. In this guide, we’ll show you how to get Anaconda up and running on Ubuntu.

install Anaconda on Ubuntu

Before we begin

In this guide, we’re focusing on how to build and install Anaconda for Ubuntu. That said, if you use Elementary OS, Peppermint OS, Zorin OS, Linux Mint, or any other operating systems based on Ubuntu, the instructions will work as well.

So even if you’re not on traditional Ubuntu, feel free to follow along to get the Anaconda app working on your Linux system!

Install Anaconda on Ubuntu – preparing the installation

Anaconda does work on Ubuntu, but there aren’t any pre-compiled DEB packages, and the app hasn’t made its way into the Ubuntu Snap store or Flathub Flatpak store. If you plan to use this app, you must build it yourself.

Building the Anaconda software isn’t too tricky, as most of it is taken care of by an installation script. The first step in the building process is to install all of the dependencies that the script needs to build the software.

To start the installation of Anaconda dependencies on your Ubuntu PC, open up a terminal window. To open up a terminal window, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard or search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open, use the apt install command below to get all of the dependencies set up on your system. Remember that these packages may take a couple of minutes to set up, as there is a lot to download.

sudo apt install libgl1-mesa-glx libegl1-mesa libxrandr2 libxrandr2 libxss1 libxcursor1 libxcomposite1 libasound2 libxi6 libxtst6

After getting all the dependencies taken care of, it is time to download the installation script. The script is hosted on Anaconda’s repo site. Using the wget downloader command below, grab the install script.

Note: if you wish to download the latest installation script to your Linux PC via a web browser instead of wget, you can! Click on this link here to start the download.

wget https://repo.anaconda.com/archive/Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh -O ~/Downloads/Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh

When the download process is complete, you will need to enter the “Downloads” directory. This directory holds the installation script. To access “Downloads” via terminal, enter the following CD command.

cd ~/Downloads

Inside the “Downloads” directory, use the chmod command to update the installation script’s permissions. This script must have permissions changed so that it can execute as a program.

sudo chmod +x Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh

With the file’s permissions up to date, preparation for the installation of Anaconda on your Ubuntu PC is ready to go! Move on to the next section of the guide to get the app installed!

Install Anaconda on Ubuntu – Running the installation script

The installation of Anaconda on Ubuntu can begin as the installation script is downloaded and the permissions are set. To start the installation, execute the ./Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh command below. 

To start the installation of Anaconda on Ubuntu as your user account (non-root), run the installation without the sudo command. We highly recommend installing the app in this way.

./Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh

If you prefer to install Anaconda as root on your Ubuntu PC, execute the ./Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh script with the sudo command, and Anaconda will install itself into /root/ rather than your home folder.

sudo ./Anaconda3-2020.11-Linux-x86_64.sh

Once the script is started up, you’ll see a message. This message says, “In order to continue the installation process, please review the license
agreement. Please, press ENTER to continue”. Press the Enter key to continue to the EULA.

After pressing the Enter key, you’ll be required to view the EULA. To get through it, press the Page Down key on your keyboard. Once you’ve read the agreement, type out “yes” in the prompt.

When “yes” is typed into the prompt, the Anaconda installer will ask where you want to install the app. By default, it will select the home directory. Leave it as the default and press the Enter key to continue on.

Once you press the Enter key, the Anaconda installation script will begin installing the app to your system. It will install both the terminal application (conda) as well as the GUI application (Anaconda Navigator).

When the installation is complete, the Anaconda installer will ask, “Do you wish the installer to initialize Anaconda3 by running conda init? “. If you would like to turn on Anaconda 3, type “yes.” Otherwise, close the terminal.

To start up the GUI Anaconda Navigator, press Alt + F2 on the keyboard to open up your desktop’s quick launcher. Then, type out “anaconda-navigator” to start up the app. 

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How to use Gnome System Monitor on Linux

Gnome System Monitor is an excellent system management application for the Linux desktop. It’s simple and easy to use. For this reason, it’s one of the most popular system monitoring tools in the Linux community. Here’s how to use it on your system. 

Gnome System Monitor on Linux

Installing Gnome System Monitor 

While mainly intended for use on the Gnome Desktop, the Gnome System Monitor works on all GTK-based Linux desktop environments. If you plan to use Gnome System Monitor on a desktop other than Gnome, you’ll need to install the app manually.

There are two ways to install Gnome System Monitor on Linux. If you’re using Gnome Software on your GTK desktop, you can get it that way. It is also possible to install it via the command-line terminal. This guide will cover both methods of setting up the app.

Gnome Software

To install Gnome System Monitor via Gnome Software, start by launching the Gnome Software application on the desktop. You can launch it by searching for “Software” in the app menu.

Once Gnome Software is open, find the search button in the top-left corner of the screen and click on it. After clicking on it, type in “Gnome System Monitor” and press the Enter key to view the search results.

In the search results, find “GNOME System Monitor” and click on it to go to the app’s Gnome Software page.

On the Gnome System Monitor page, find the “Install” button and click on it. Then, enter your password and allow the app to install. Once it is installed, click “Launch” to open up the app.

Terminal

If you don’t use Gnome Software but still want to install Gnome System Monitor on your computer, you can install it via the terminal command-line. First, open up a terminal on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard.

Once the terminal window is open, follow along with the command-line installation instructions outlined below that corresponds with the Linux distribution you are currently using. 

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, you’ll be able to install Gnome System Monitor by making use of the following Apt command below.

sudo apt install gnome-system-monitor

Debian

Those on Debian Linux can install the Gnome System Monitor by making use of the Apt-get command below.

sudo apt-get install gnome-system-monitor

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, the Gnome System Monitor application is installable by making use of the Pacman command.

sudo pacman -S gnome-system-monitor

Fedora

Fedora Linux users can get the Gnome System Monitor application up and running by making use of the Dnf command.

sudo dnf install gnome-system-monitor

OpenSUSE

Are you using OpenSUSE Linux? Get Gnome System Monitor up and running by making use of the Zypper command.

sudo zypper install gnome-system-monitor'
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Snap

Gnome System Monitor is available as a Snap package for those who are interested. To get it set up, ensure you have the Snap runtime working on your computer. After that, use the command below to get it working.

sudo snap install gnome-system-monitor

How to use Gnome System Monitor on Linux

To use the Gnome System Monitor on Linux, start by opening up the app menu and searching for “Gnome System Monitor.” Once you’ve found it, click on it to start it up. Alternatively, you can launch it by typing out “gnome-system-monitor” in a terminal window. 

Once the Gnome System Monitor application is open on your computer screen, follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to use the app.

Step 1: Find the “Processes” tab in Gnome System Monitor, and click on it with the mouse. In this tab, you’ll see an overview of all running processes on your Linux PC. 

Step 2: Once inside the “Processes” tab, look through the running processes list until you see a process you wish to stop running. Gnome System Monitor only shows running processes for your user account. 

If you cannot find the process you wish to stop running, find the search button at the top right-hand corner of the app, click on it. Then, use it to search for your running process.

Step 3: When you’ve found your running process in Gnome System Monitor, right-click on it with the mouse. Once you’ve right-clicked on it, then right-click menu will appear. 

Step 4: Inside the right-click menu, locate the “End” option and select it. This option will end the process.

Alternatively, if selecting “End” doesn’t stop Gnome System Monitor’s process, try selecting the “Kill” option to kill the process.

Monitoring

While the main draw to Gnome System Monitor is its ability to manage running processes, that’s not all it does. You can also monitor your hardware with it. To view information on CPU performance, memory usage, or network usage, select the “Resources” tab. Or, click “File Systems” to view file system usage information.

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How to install the Evolution RSS reader plugin on Linux

Ever wanted to catch up with your favorite RSS feeds in the Evolution email client? Thanks to the Evolution RSS reader plugin, you can! It adds RSS functionality that you can use to catch up on your favorite RSS feed items. Here’s how to set it up.

Evolution RSS reader plugin

Installing Evolution email on Linux

The Evolution RSS reader plugin needs the Evolution email client to function. For this reason, we’ll need to go over how to install the Evolution email client on your computer.

Evolution is available for most Linux operating systems. To start the installation of the Evolution email client on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window. You can open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, open up the app menu and search for “terminal.”

Once the terminal window is open, follow along with the command-line installation instructions outlined below that correspond with the Linux operating system you currently use.

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, the Evolution application can be easily installed by making use of the Apt command below.

sudo apt install evolution

Debian

If you’re using Debian, you can get Evolution set up on your system by making use of the Apt-get command below.

sudo apt-get install evolution

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, the Evolution email client is installable via the Pacman command.

sudo pacman -S evolution 

Fedora

If you’re using Fedora Linux, the dnf command can be used to install the Evolution app.

sudo dnf install evolution

OpenSUSE

To get Evolution up and running on OpenSUSE, make use of the following Zypper command.

sudo zypper install evolution

Installing Evolution RSS reader plugin on Linux

The Evolution email client is now installed. However, just installing the email client isn’t enough, as the Evolution RSS plugin doesn’t come with it. To get the Evolution RSS plugin working, you’ll need to set up the plugin manually.

To set up the Evolution RSS plugin on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop. You can launch a terminal window on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “terminal” in the app menu to open it that way.

Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, follow along with the installation instructions below that match your Linux OS to get the Evolution RSS plugin set up on your computer. 

Ubuntu 

On Ubuntu, the Evolution RSS plugin is available for installation on every version of Ubuntu starting at 16.04, all the way to 20.10. To install the plugin, make use of the apt install command below.

sudo apt install evolution-rss

Debian

On Debian Linux, from Debian 9 to Debian 10, 11, and Sid, you can get the Evolution RSS plugin working from the “Main” software repository. To install it, use the Apt-get command below.

sudo apt-get install evolution-rss

Arch Linux

On Arch Linux, you can get the Evolution RSS plugin up and running on your system through the “Community” software repository. To start the installation, ensure you have “Community” enabled. After that, make use of the Pacman command.

sudo pacman -S evolution-rss

Fedora

On Fedora 32, 33, and Fedora Rawhide, the Evolution RSS plugin is available for installation. To set it up on your computer, make use of the following Dnf command below.

sudo dnf install evolution-rss

OpenSUSE

On OpenSUSE, the official software repositories do not support the Evolution RSS plugin. However, it is possible to install the plugin through a third-party repository. To get it working, head over to the OpenSUSE Build Service, select your distribution and install it.

How to use the Evolution RSS plugin 

To use the Evolution RSS plugin, start up the Evolution email client. Once it’s open, use the startup wizard to configure your email account if you haven’t already. You’ll need to have your email account set up in Evolution to use this plugin.

Once you’ve gotten your email account configured in the Evolution email app, find the “Edit” menu and click on it with the mouse. After selecting the “Edit” button with the mouse, look for the “Preferences” option, and click on it with the mouse.

Inside the “Preferences” window, there are several options to choose from. Look to the very bottom for “News and Blogs” and select it with the mouse. “News and Blogs” is the Evolution RSS configuration area.

In “News and Blogs,” find the “Add” button and click on it to add a new feed. Repeat this process till all feeds are added to the Evolution mail app.

When you’ve added all RSS feeds to Evolution, you’ll start seeing RSS items pop up in the “News and Blogs” section of the sidebar in Evolution. To read any RSS item, click on “News and Blogs,” followed by the feed.

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How to install qt 5 on Ubuntu

Are you an Ubuntu Linux user and developer that needs Qt 5 installed on your system? Can’t figure out what packages to install to use it? We can help! Follow along with this guide as we go over how to install Qt 5 on Linux!

install qt 5 on Ubuntu

Install Qt 5 on Ubuntu via official software repositories – terminal

If you’re using Ubuntu, the best way to get Qt 5 up and running on your system is through the official Ubuntu software repositories. To start the installation process, you must open up a terminal window. 

To open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu Linux desktop, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Alternatively, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and open it up that way.

Once the terminal window is open on the Ubuntu desktop, the installation can begin. Using the apt install command, set up the “qt5-default” package on your computer. 

sudo apt install qt5-default

After typing in the apt install command above, Ubuntu will ask you for your password. The reason it is asking for your password is that sudo requires a password. Type in your user password and press the Enter key. Do not worry if you do not see any password feedback.

If your password was entered successfully, the terminal should accept it and attempt to collect all dependencies required for the “qt5-default” package on your system. Once all dependencies are collected, press the button to continue with the installation. 

The installation of Qt 5 using the official Ubuntu software sources should be quick, as only a handful of things need to be downloaded and installed on your system. For more information on Qt 5, check out the official documentation.

Install Qt 5 on Ubuntu via official software repositories – GUI

If you’d prefer to set up Qt 5 on your Ubuntu PC using the GUI, the best way to go is with the Synaptic Package Manager. It’s an excellent application that gives Ubuntu users the ability to search and install packages without touching the terminal.

Sadly, Synaptic doesn’t come pre-installed on Ubuntu systems anymore. To get it working, open up Ubuntu Software, search for “Synaptic,” and install it. Once you’ve got it working, open it via the app menu.

With Synaptic Package Manager open, look for the “Search” button in the top-right section of the app, and click on it with the mouse. Then, click on the text box next to “Search” and type out “qt5-default”.

After typing out your search term, find the “search” button inside of the pop-up window and click it to perform a search of the Ubuntu software repositories. The search should not take long.

Look through the search results for “qt5-default,” and right-click on it with the mouse. Inside the right-click menu, look for the option “Mark for installation” and select it.

Now that the “qt5-default” package is marked for installation in Synaptic Package Manager locate the “Apply” button and select it with the mouse. When you click “Apply,” Synaptic will attempt to download and install Qt 5 on your Ubuntu PC.

The installation shouldn’t take too long. When the process is complete, close Synaptic Package Manager as it is no longer necessary. For more information on Qt 5 for Linux, check the documentation.

Install Qt 5 on Ubuntu via the Qt website

While it is highly recommended to install Qt 5 on Ubuntu using Ubuntu’s official packages, it is also possible to download Qt 5 from the website and install it that way.

To start the installation of Qt 5 via the official website, open up a terminal window. You can open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu desktop with Ctrl + Alt + T or search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open, make use of the wget command to download the latest Qt 5 from the website.

wget https://download.qt.io/official_releases/qt/5.12/5.12.10/qt-opensource-linux-x64-5.12.10.run

After downloading Qt 5, you must update the permissions of the file so that it can be executed as a program.

sudo chmod +x qt-opensource-linux-x64-5.12.10.run

Execute the Qt 5 run file to start the installation. 

./qt-opensource-linux-x64-5.12.10.run

Following the installation of the Qt 5 run file, you must install various dependencies. These dependencies are required for Qt 5 to run correctly on Ubuntu. 

sudo apt install libfontconfig1 build-essential mesa-common-dev libglu1-mesa-dev

After installing all of these dependencies, you will need to create a desktop entry for Ubuntu. To do this, enter the commands below.

touch ~/.local/share/applications/Qt-Creator.desktop

echo "[Desktop Entry] Version=1.0 Encoding=UTF-8 Type=Application Name=QtCreator Comment=QtCreator NoDsiplay=true Exec=(Install folder of QT)/Tools/QtCreator/bin/qtcreator %f Icon=(Install folder of QT)/5.4/Src/qtdoc/doc/images/landing/icon_QtCreator_78x78px.png Name[en_US]=Qt-Creator" > ~/.local/share/applicationsQt-Creator.desktop

Update the permissions of the Qt Creator file with chmod.

sudo chmod +x ~/.local/share/applicationsQt-Creator.desktop

Make Qt the default file association for pro files on Ubuntu using echo.

echo "text/qtcreator=Qt-Creator.desktop;" >> ~/.local/share/applications/defaults.list

After adding the file association, everything should work.

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