5 Best Bluetooth Gaming Controllers With Linux Compatibility (Buying Guide)

Are you trying to find the perfect Bluetooth gaming controller for your Linux PC? Overwhelmed and unsure of what to get? We can help! Follow along as we go over 5 Bluetooth gaming controllers that work on Linux!

Bluetooth Controllers on Linux

Bluetooth controllers work on Linux thanks to the Linux kernel, and it’s an excellent support for the Bluetooth protocol. However, you should know that not every Linux operating system enables Bluetooth out of the box. In many cases, it is turned off and must be manually turned on.

If you plan to get a Bluetooth gaming controller to use on your Linux PC, be sure to check out our guide on how to set up Bluetooth on Linux. It’ll walk you through the Bluetooth setup process on Linux so that you can connect your favorite wireless devices!

Best Bluetooth Gaming Controllers on the Market

If you’re a Linux gamer looking for the perfect Bluetooth gaming controller, this list will help you make an informed decision on what to purchase. Here are our picks for 5 Bluetooth gaming controllers that work on Linux!

1. Xbox Core controller

The Xbox Core controller is an updated version of the Microsoft Xbox One S controller. Like the old S controller, it supports both Bluetooth connectivity, USB connectivity, as well as Microsoft’s wireless dongle (which works on Linux with the help of Xow).

This controller is the perfect pick for the best Bluetooth gaming controller for those reasons alone. However, you should also consider picking it up, as it has the best support for games on Steam in Linux.

Pros

  • Can connect to Linux either via Bluetooth or via USB-C connector cable.
  • In addition to working with Linux via Bluetooth connectivity or cable, users can also use the Xbox Core controller on Xbox One or the new next-gen Xbox consoles.
  • Replaceable AA batteries make swapping batteries very easy.
  • Support for Steam games on Linux, as well as any Linux game that supports Xinput.

Cons

  • The controller uses AA batteries, which may not be for everyone.

2. DualShock 4 Wireless Controller

If you’re not a fan of the Xbox controller, the next best Bluetooth controller to get for your Linux system is the Sony PS4 controller.

Why? It supports Bluetooth wireless connectivity to Linux, as well as USB connections. And, it supports games on Steam so long as you enable it in the Steam controller settings!

Sony certainly lags behind Microsoft when it comes to controller support on Linux. That said, the PS4 controller is an excellent pickup and will work great for 99% of the wireless gaming you plan to do on Linux!

Pros

  • Can connect to Linux via Bluetooth or with a Micro USB cable. 
  • In addition to working with Linux via Bluetooth connectivity or cable, users can also use the DualShock 4 on the PS4 gaming console.
  • It has a long-lasting rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery.
  • Instant support for all games on Steam (after enabling PS4 controller support in Steam.)

Cons

  • It does not come with a USB charge cable and requires the user to purchase it separately.

3. Sunwaytek H511 Bluetooth Game Controller

While both the Xbox and PS4 controllers make great Bluetooth gaming controllers, their buttons aren’t very tactile, and if you value precision in gaming, you’ll need to find another controller. The Sunwaytek H511 is that controller.

The Sunwaytek H511 is an amazing mechanical Bluetooth gaming controller. It has an incredibly ergonomic design and tactile, clicky mechanical gaming buttons. Best of all, it supports Linux, as well as Android, Nintendo Switch, and even iOS. If you love clicky, snappy buttons on your controller, Suffice it to say, give the Sunwaytek H511 a look!

Pros

  • The beautiful, ergonomic design and mechanical buttons make gaming very comfortable. 
  • Easily supports both Linux and Raspberry Pi gaming operating systems such as RetroPie, as well as Android, Nintendo Switch, and even iOS.
  • Built-in rechargeable battery.
  • As the buttons on the controller are mechanical, users can easily remove and replace them as desired.

Cons

  • The odd-shaped D-pad might be a turn off for some.

4. 8Bitdo Sn30 Pro+ Bluetooth Gamepad

8Bitdo is known in the gaming community for making incredible after-market controllers for the Nintendo Switch as well as the PC gaming community. In terms of craftsmanship, their 8Bitdo Sn30 Pro+ Bluetooth Gamepad is their best work yet. 

In terms of Linux compatibility, the 8Bitdo Sn30 Pro+ Bluetooth Gamepad is a contender, offering support over Bluetooth as well as USB on Linux, the Raspberry Pi, and other platforms. If you’re looking for an excellent all-around Bluetooth gamepad, this is one to check out!

Pros

  • Super Nintendo-like design makes the controller incredibly comfortable to hold in the hand. 
  • It is compatible with Linux via Bluetooth or over USB with a direct connection and Android, MacOS, the Raspberry Pi, and others.
  • Has a turbo button and support for turbo mode.
  • Built-in rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery. 

Cons

  • The charging cable supplied with the controller is too short.

5. 8Bitdo N30 Pro Wireless Bluetooth

The 8Bitdo N30 doesn’t have the bells and whistles that the Sn30 Pro+ has, but it makes up for it by being incredibly portable and compact. For this reason, it’s a worthy pickup for any Linux gamer looking for a quality Bluetooth gaming controller.

Like all 8Bitdo products, the N30 Pro has excellent Linux support, allowing for gameplay over Bluetooth and USB. It also supports Android, Raspberry Pi, iOS, etc., making it a great all-around gamepad.

Pros

  • Sports a compact, retro Super Nintendo design while also providing modern features like analog sticks.
  • Excellent Linux support over Bluetooth as well as direct USB connectivity. It also supports Android, Raspberry Pi, iOS, etc.
  • Built-in rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery for long gaming sessions.
  • The controller has upgradeable firmware.

Cons

  • Some might find the controller too cramped.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over 5 Bluetooth gaming controllers that work on Linux. However, there are more than just 5 Bluetooth gaming controllers out there.

What is your favorite Bluetooth gaming controller to use on Linux? Tell us in the comments!

The post 5 Best Bluetooth Gaming Controllers With Linux Compatibility (Buying Guide) appeared first on AddictiveTips.

6 Best USB Flash Drives to Use for Portable Linux in 2021

Are you on the lookout for a USB flash drive to run portable Linux distributions but can’t figure out what drive to buy? We can help! Follow along with this list as we go over the 6 best USB flash drives to use for portable Linux!

Buying a USB flash drive for Linux

If you plan to run an operating system from a USB flash drive, there’s one thing you need to keep in mind: input/output speeds. With high input/output speeds, you’ll be able to get the full Linux experience without any performance slow-downs. Menu animations and performance won’t be hindered, and you’ll have a great user experience.

On the other hand, if you have a USB flash drive with low input/output speeds, the Linux experience will still be useful but limited in performance due to slow speeds.

For the best Linux experience, get a USB flash drive with incredible input/output speeds. If you can’t, try to determine if your budget USB flash drive is compatible with USB 3.0 to increase performance.

Best USB flash drives to run portable Linux

Picking the best USB flash drive to run a portable Linux distribution on is challenging, as there are thousands and thousands of USB flash drives on the market today.

That’s why we’ve created a concise, simple list that can help you make an educated purchase. Here are our picks!

1. SanDisk Ultra Fit USB 3.1 Flash Drive

If you’re looking for the perfect USB flash drive to run a portable Linux operating system on, the SanDisk Ultra Fit 3.1 should be your first choice.

It’s a compact, high-speed USB flash drive with incredibly fast input/output speeds (read up to 130 Mbps/write 15X faster than USB 2.0) and large storage space, too, with sizes starting at 16 GB going all the way up to 512 GB.

Aside from the technical specs, the SanDisk Ultra Fit is also pretty stylish. Design-wise, the Ultra Fit is a “nano” sized flash drive. It won’t take up too much space and stays out of your way.

Pros

  • The slim design of the device makes it easier to carry around and transport.
  • It has a lanyard hook that can be used to add to a lanyard necklace.
  • Incredibly fast read/write speeds up to 15X faster than USB 2.0.

Cons

  • The small design may make the device easy to lose.

2. SanDisk Cruzer USB 2.0 Flash Drive

The SanDisk Cruzer USB 2.0 flash drive is probably the world’s most used flash drive. It’s not hard to see why, with its excellent retractable USB design and decent input/output performance speeds despite being USB 2.0 rather than USB 3.0 or newer.

While not as performant as other Sandisk offerings, the Cruzer is a reliable USB flash drive, as it offers up decent storage sizes at an affordable price from as small as 16 GB to as big as 256 GB. It will handle running a portable Linux operating system with ease; you can be sure of that. 

Pros

  • Offers up a massive amount of storage.
  • Is forward compatible with USB 3.0 ports.
  • Very affordable price tag.

Cons

  • It is a USB 2.0 device that may not perform as well as 3.0 devices.

3. Samsung BAR Plus USB 3.1 Flash Drive

Samsung is known for their flashy product design. The Samsung BAR Plus USB 3.1 Flash Drive is no different. It’s an elegant, metal USB stick with a port on one end and a lanyard hookup on the other.

The device comes in either silver metal or grey metal and supports storage sizes from 32 GB to 256 GB.

Style isn’t the only thing the Samsung BAR Plus has going for it, though. The specs are quite impressive, and it can deliver an impressive 300 MB per second input/output, perfect for running a portable Linux distro.

Pros

  • It is a USB 3.1 device offering up blistering input/output speeds of up to 300 Mpbs.
  • Has a lanyard hook for lanyard necklaces.
  • Offers a large amount of storage space.

Cons

  • It is shaped weird and may feel pointy in your pocket.

4. PNY Turbo

The PNY Turbo is a USB 3.0 spin on the classic PNY covered flash drive. It comes in a gray plastic housing and has a protective cover for the USB port. The device is impressive speed-wise and supports input/output speeds up to 10x faster than a USB 2.0 flash drive and storage space of up to 256 GB.

PNY Turbo, while not as flashy as the Samsung USB flash drives or as slim as the SanDisk fit drives, still fit its niche by being a sensibly designed, useful device that can deliver a tremendous portable Linux experience.

Pros

  • It has a plastic USB hood cover to keep the dirt out of the device, as well as a lanyard hook.
  • Offers up a decent amount of storage space.
  • Fast USB 3.0 input/output speeds up to 10x faster than USB 2.0 drives.

Cons

  • The plastic hood cover can come off.

5. SanDisk Cruzer Fit USB Flash Drive

The Sandisk Cruzer Fit is a more affordable alternative to the SanDisk Ultra Fit 3.1. It shares a similar, ultra-portable design yet is considerably more accessible to the consumer as it is not a USB 3.1 device but 2.0. It also doesn’t offer nearly as large in the way of storage, with the largest model offering 64 GB in storage space instead of 512 GB.

While the Cruzer Fit is not a USB 3.1 device, it still is an excellent flash drive to pick up for those on a budget, and it’ll deliver a great portable Linux experience.

Pros

  • The incredibly slim design makes it ultra-portable.
  • It has a very affordable price tag with adequate storage.
  • Upward compatible with USB 3.0 ports.

Cons

  • Is a USB 2.0 device.

6. HP v150w USB 2.0 Flash Drive 

HP is a computer manufacturer and isn’t well known in the USB flash drive industry. Still, they managed to make a pretty fantastic, affordable USB 2.0 flash drive in the v150w.

The v150w USB 2.0 flash drive is an excellent little device, and it comes in sizes of 16 GB to 128 GB. It’s input/output speed is as expected for a 2.0 drive and will work in both USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports.

If you’re tight on cash and need a good, dependable USB flash drive to run Linux on, give this one a go.

Pros

  • Very affordable for consumers on a tight budget with a variety of storage choices.
  • Upward compatible with USB 3.0 ports.

Cons

  • Bulky design.
  • Is a USB 2.0 device.

Conclusion

In this list, we covered the 6 best USB flash drives to use for portable Linux distributions.

However, there are way more than 6 flash drives on the market. So, tell us, what is your go-to USB flash drive to use for portable Linux distributions?

The post 6 Best USB Flash Drives to Use for Portable Linux in 2021 appeared first on AddictiveTips.

The 5 Best Linux SSDs on The Market (Reviews) in 2021

Solid State Drives are becoming more and more popular these days with Linux users as they become more affordable for the average consumer. But what SSD is best for Linux users? Let’s find out!

Using an SSD on Linux

The Linux platform supports SSDs quite well, as all filesystems available to users have access to powerful SSD optimization features built-in to the platform. However, not all Linux operating systems choose to enable SSD optimization features by default. If you’re looking for an SSD to use on Linux, you should know about SSD optimization.

SSD optimization on Linux involves reducing reads/writes and utilizing TRIM (a process that clears unused data blocks to improve the drive performance). For more information on how you can take advantage of SSD optimizations on Linux, follow our guide on the subject.

Best performing SSDs for Linux

Picking the perfect SSD to use on Linux is a tough job, as there are just so many drives that look similar on the market. To cut through the noise, we’ve made a list of the 5 best performing SSDs for Linux. Here are our picks!

1. Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD

If you’re a Linux user in need of a good, dependable NVMe SSD, look no further than the Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD.

The 970 EVO Plus is a rocket, with read/write speeds up to a blistering 3,500 Mbps. It can also handle a ton of data, with sizes going all the way up to 2 TB, and supports full-disk encryption thanks to the Samsung Magician tool.

Pros

  • It supports many different storage capacity options, ranging from 250 GB, 500 GB, 1 TB, and 2 TB, respectively. 
  • Very speedy performance, with a read and write speeds up to 3500 Mbps.
  • Includes Samsung Magician Software, which can help manage your SSD’s security, firmware, and performance.
  • Samsung’s “Dynamic Thermal Guard” prevents overheating and performance degradation.

Cons

  • The Samsung Magician Software tool on Linux is only a command-line utility, which might turn off new users.

2. Crucial P5 PCIe NVMe SSD

Our second pick for SSDs that are great for Linux users is the Crucial P5. It comes in various sizes, offering up drives as small as 250 GB or as large as 2 TB.

The P5 is an incredibly impressive NVMe SSD with performance as high as 3400 Mpbs for read and 3000 for write and “dynamic write acceleration” to improve performance.

You can also expect full-disk encryption support thanks to the built-in disk-encryption support the device offers.

Pros

  • The P5 is available in different data capacities, such as 250 GB, 500 GB, 1 TB, and 2 TB. 
  • It supports super-fast reading and writing speeds, clocking in at 3400 Mpbs for reading data and 3000 for writing data.
  • The Crucial P5 supports full-drive encryption, a bonus for Linux users that take their data privacy seriously.
  • Includes advanced “dynamic write acceleration” to improve performance as much as possible while in use.

Cons

  • Disk encryption is supported, although there is no special Linux software to accomplish this. Many Linux users may need to rely on their own PC’s BIOS capabilities to encrypt.

3. XPG S40G RGB 3D NAND PCIe NVMe SSD

If you’re a Linux user that loves flashy RGB lighting, you’ll love the XPG S40G RGB 3D NAND PCIe NVMe SSD. It’s a very speedy NVMe (with read/write speeds clocking at 3500 and 1900, respectively), with full RGB support that will allow you to light up the room! 

Pros

  • The SSD is available in a wide variety of capacities, ranging from 256 GB to 4 TB.
  • It has RGB lighting built onto the chip that is sure to light up your Linux PC.
  • It supports a read speed of 3500 Mbps and a write speed of up to 1900 Mbps, an excellent performance rating for gaming and productivity under Linux.
  • It is rated for up to 300K/240K IOPS (input/output operations per second).

Cons

  • It is unclear if the RGB lighting is controllable via Linux, as the developer hasn’t indicated support for the platform.

4. SAMSUNG 860 PRO SATA SSD

Are you looking for an affordable SATA SSD for your Linux system? If so, the SAMSUNG 860 PRO is a great choice.

For starters, it’s a fast drive with a write speed of 530 Mbps and a read speed of up to 560 Mpbs. It also offers up a wide variety of sizes ranging from 256 GB to 4 TB in size. And for added benefit, it’s a Samsung, so you’ll get full disk-encryption via Samsung Magician!

Pros

  • Offers different sizes, ranging from 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB, 2 TB, up to 4 TB in size.
  • It supports a write speed of 530 Mbps and a read speed of up to 560 Mpbs.
  • Supports disk encryption (AES 256-bit hardware-based), which can be managed by the Samsung Magician Software tool.
  • Comes with a 2.5 inch SATA 3 (6 GB/s) cable.

Cons

  • The Samsung Magician Software tool on Linux is command-line based, which may put off Linux users unfamiliar with terminal commands.

5. SAMSUNG 860 QVO SATA SSD

Are you in need of a good SSD for Linux that has massive data capacity? Consider the SAMSUNG 860 QVO. It’s an impressive drive that offers capacities as large as 4 TB, with decent write speed too. And it’s a Samsung SSD, so you’ll get full disk encryption support on Linux, and firmware updates too.

Pros

  • The SSD offers large data capacity with drives sized at 1 TB, 2 TB, and 4 TB.
  • Speedy SATA read/write speeds clocking in at 550 for reading and 520 for writing.
  • It offers full disk-encryption, firmware updates, and other configurations via Samsung’s Magician app.

Cons

  • Not as affordable as other Samsung SSD offerings.
  • The Samsung Magician Software tool is command-line only on Linux, and many users who do not like the command-line may dislike this fact.

Conclusion

In this list, we discussed the 5 best SSDs to use on Linux. However, there are more than 5 SSDs out there, and companies are releasing new models every day.

So, what SSD do you use with your Linux system? Tell us in the comment section below!

The post The 5 Best Linux SSDs on The Market (Reviews) in 2021 appeared first on AddictiveTips.

4 Best Low-end GPUs for Linux Users in 2021 (Buying Guide)

Are you in need of a good, low-power graphics card for your Linux PC? Not sure what to get to use on your Linux system? If this sounds like you, you’ve come to the right place! Follow along with us as we go over the 4 best low-end graphics cards for Linux users!

GPU support on Linux

GPU support on Linux isn’t what it is on Microsoft Windows. Due to Linux being used by fewer people than Windows, the GPU manufacturers (AMD and NVIDIA) spend significantly less time developing drivers for the platform. 

Yes, Linux users can typically find support for most mainstream GPUs out there today, but the support isn’t always good. For this reason, it’s a good idea to pick a GPU that has support from the open-source community, as they typically fill the gaps where Nvidia and AMD fall short.

All of the GPUs we cover in this list have support with open-source GPU drivers, as well as proprietary drivers. Since they support both types of drivers, the GPU you purchase will live on with Linux for as long as possible. 

For more information on how to get started with Nvidia or AMD drivers on your Linux system, please check out the list of links below. 

The best low-end GPU for Linux

A lot is made about expensive graphics cards these days, even on Linux. It is understandable, but what if you just need a low-end graphics card for basic functionality on Linux? Sadly, the low-end GPU market isn’t as lucrative, and as a result, many Linux users don’t know what to buy.

Not to worry! We’ve got you covered! Here are our picks for the best low-end GPUs to use on Linux!

1. ZOTAC GeForce GT 1030

The ZOTAC GeForce GT 1030 is our top pick for the best low-profile GPU to use on Linux.

Why? For starters, it is well supported on Linux through both open-source drivers and open-source ones too. It also packs some impressive features, like support for high-end screen resolutions of 7680×4320, fast video ram, and more.

Pros

  • The GPU has support for multiple monitors via HDMI and DVI-D.
  • The latest Nvidia Linux drivers list this device as supported, and should be supported for the foreseeable future.
  • The low profile bracket allows for the PNY GeForce GT 1030 to fit into tight PC cases.
  • The GPU has 2 GBs of video RAM clocked at  1227 MHz. It can boost up to 1468 MHz.
  • The GPU supports a maximum resolution of 7680 x 4320.

Cons

  • It has no support for display port or VGA on the device, which may be a deal-breaker with those using non HDMI or DVI-D displays.

2. MSI GeForce GT 710

Another excellent choice of low-profile GPU for Linux users to check out is the MSI GeForce GT 710. It has 2 GBs of video memory clocked at 1600 Mhz, supports triple monitors at a maximum resolution of 4096×2160, and has support on Linux via official Nvidia drivers and open-source ones.

It’s also very slim, and can fit just about anywhere!

Pros

  • The MSI GeForce GT 710 has 2 GBs of video memory clocked at 1600 Mhz.
  • Has triple monitor support by way of DVI-D, HDMI, and VGA.
  • The latest Nvidia drivers support this device, and it should enjoy support for the foreseeable future.
  • The form factor is low profile so the MSI GeForce GT 710 will fit into even the tightest of PC cases.
  • HDMI supports a resolution of up to  4096 x 2160, DVI 560 x 1600.

Cons

  • The device uses DDR3 rather than the standard GDDR5 or newer, which might translate into slower performance.

3. XFX RX 550

If Nvidia isn’t your style and you need a good low-profile GPU, the XFX RX 550 is a great option.

It offers triple monitor support (HDMI, Display Port, and DVI-D) at 4096×2160, has 2 GB of video ram clocked at 1203 Mhz, and works well on Linux of the box without the need to install drivers thanks to AMD’s open-source drivers.

Pros

  • The GPU offers triple monitor support via HDMI, Display Port, and DVI-D.
  • Has 2 GB of DDR5 video RAM, clocked at 1203MHz.
  • It supports a maximum resolution of 4096×2160.
  • Enjoys support on Linux from within the kernel itself, with no need to install anything, thanks to AMD’s open-source drivers.
  • Dual fans on the GPU offer superior cooling while doing heavy tasks.

Cons

  • The huge form factor makes it a tight fight on small PCs.
  • Open source AMD GPU drivers, while excellent, aren’t as performant as Nvidia drivers while gaming in some instances.
  • Triple monitor support is all digital and has no support for VGA, which means older monitors will not work with it.

4. Sapphire Radeon Pulse RX 550

Want a slim low-powered GPU but don’t want to sacrifice performance to get there? If so, do yourself a favor and take a look at the Sapphire Radeon Pulse RX 550. I

t’s an impressive GPU that packs a punch with things like triple monitor support (maximum resolution of 5120×2880,) as well as 2 GB of supercharged 1500 Mhz video RAM, and support for Linux out of the box!

Pros

  • Has 2 GB of video RAM clocked at 1500 MHz.
  • Triple monitor support via Display Port, HDMI, and DVI-D.
  • Low profile design allows for easy fitting into packed computers and Linux workstations.
  • It is supported on the Linux platform via the open-source AMD GPU drivers built into the Linux kernel, with no need to install anything.
  • The GPU supports a maximum resolution of 5120×2880.

Cons

  • The open-source AMD drivers can perform worse than the Nvidia drivers while gaming on Linux in some cases.
  • While the device supports three monitors, it does not include VGA support, which means older monitors will not work.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over the 4 best low-end GPUs to use on Linux. Each of the GPUs we discussed is excellent in their ways, and undoubtedly worthy of picking up.

If you’ve been struggling to find an affordable, low-powered graphics card to power your Linux workstation, we hope that this list has helped you make the right decision!

The post 4 Best Low-end GPUs for Linux Users in 2021 (Buying Guide) appeared first on AddictiveTips.

4 Best USB DVD Drives for Linux Users in 2021 (Buying Guide)

Most Linux computers do not have a CD/DVD drive attached to them anymore. Not having a CD/DVD drive usually isn’t a huge issue, as most people do things over the internet or via USB. However, if you have some old PC games, movies, or data to access, not having a disc drive is a huge problem.

There are many excellent USB DVD drives available online these days. However, not all of them work with the Linux platform. That’s why we’ve made this list of 4 USB DVD drives that work on Linux. 

DVD playback on Linux

The DVD drives on this list work on Linux thanks to drivers included within the kernel and the manufacturer’s effort to bring drivers to the platform. However, there’s something you should know: DVD Playback on Linux is turned off by default on almost all Linux distributions.

Why is DVD playback disabled by default? In short, legal reasons. Linux operating system developers don’t want to get into hot water distributing proprietary DVD playback codecs. If you plan to get one of the USB DVD drives from this list and intend to use it for movie playback, please follow the instructions below to get playback working.

If your Linux distribution isn’t covered in the list, but you still want DVD playback, do yourself a favor and install the VLC media player. Even with DVD playback shut off, it will decode most DVDs and play them back on any Linux system! For information on how to get the latest VLC media player on Linux, check out this guide!

Best USB DVD Drives forLinux

There are many USB DVD drives available on the market to choose from. So many that it’s enough to make the average person overwhelmed with choices.

To help you make an informed purchase, we’ve carefully selected USB DVD drives that are confirmed to play well with mainstream Linux operating systems. 

1. Rioddas External USB 3.0 Portable CD/DVD +/-RW Drive

The Rioddas External USB DVD drive works excellent with the Linux platform, as it supports “plug-n-play.” So, there is no need to install drivers on your Linux PC before attempting to use it. Just connect it and go!

Feature-wise, the Rioddas External USB DVD has a lot to offer. It supports both CD and DVD writing capabilities with speeds up to 24X, has a prominent eject button so you won’t have to worry about getting discs stuck in the drive, has non-slip rubber pads on the bottom, and is backward compatible with USB 1.0 and 2.0.

Rioddas External USB DVD drive is an excellent choice for Linux users. Especially those looking to access old optical media on Linux as well as create new CDs or DVDs. 

Pros

  • Is backward compatible with older USB ports.
  • It can burn at speeds of up to 24X.
  • Has anti-slip pads on the bottom of the device to discourage disc skipping.
  • Works on Linux without any need for drivers.
  • It has a prominent eject button, so users don’t have to fight to open the disc tray.

Cons

  • The drive USB cable might be too short for some users’ liking.

2. ROOFULL External CD/DVD Drive

The ROOFULL External CD/DVD Drive is another excellent external USB CD/DVD drive for Linux users to use, as it is “plug-n-play” and does not require drivers to use the device on most Linux operating systems. 

The ROOFULL drive has many exciting features such as the eject button, anti-slip feet, burning speeds up to 24X, and the ability to read/write CDs/DVDs.

However, out of all of the features it offers, the one that stands out is USB-C support. So, if your Linux PC primarily uses USB type-C, this may be the drive to go with.

Pros

  • Works on Linux with USB plug-n-play and no drivers required and is backward compatible with older ports.
  • It can burn at speeds of up to 24X.
  • Supports USB-C right on the drive cable. No need to get a separate adapter.
  • Comes with a carrying case.
  • Has a laptop-style eject button.

Cons

  • USB cable is a bit short, and some users might prefer a longer cable.
  • The carrying case is a bit cheap.

3. Amicool External CD/DVD Drive

The Amicool External CD/DVD Drive, like many of the drives covered on this list, is a “plug-n-play” device. Meaning, all you need to do to use it is plug it into a USB port. However, what makes it unique is that it has “intelligent burning” technology, allowing users to interrupt burning and resume it at will.

Aside from the intelligent burning technology included in the drive, it also has other useful features. Features such as backward compatibility with older USB ports, has anti-slip pads, burning support for CD/DVDs at up to 24X, an easy-to-press eject button, and more.

Pros

  • Works on the Linux platform via “plug-n-play.”
  • It can burn at speeds of up to 24X.
  • Intelligent burning technology allows users to resume burning if interrupted.
  • Supports USB-C via an included dongle that attaches to the cord.
  • Is compatible with older USB ports (1.0 and 2.0).

Cons

  • The cord is relatively short, and USB-C support isn’t built onto the cable but requires a dongle.

4. HAIWAY External CD DVD Drive

The last item on our list of external USB DVD drives that work with Linux is the HAIWAY External CD DVD Drive. Like all other drives on this list, it is “plug-n-play” and will work on the majority of Linux systems with no need to install drivers. It also supports burning both CD/DVD at a max speed of 24X.

In terms of features, the HAIWAY External CD DVD Drive supports both USB 3.0 and older 2.0 and 1.0 ports. It has a prominent eject button and anti-slip pads on the bottom. It also promises a data transmission rate of 5 Gbps, which could be useful when moving old data from optical media to modern equipment.

Pros

  • Support on Linux with no drivers thanks to “plug-n-play.” 
  • The device has anti-slip pads and a prominent eject button for easy ejecting.
  • The device supports data transmission of up to 5 Gbps.
  • It can burn at speeds of up to 24X.
  • Backward compatible with older USB ports like USB 2.0 and 1.0.

Cons

  • USB cable is very short.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over 4 USB DVD drives that work well on the Linux platform. If you had issues finding a good USB DVD drive on Linux, hopefully, this list helped, and you now know what drive to get that will play well with your Linux PC!

The post 4 Best USB DVD Drives for Linux Users in 2021 (Buying Guide) appeared first on AddictiveTips.