5 Best Laptop Docking Stations to Use with Linux (2021 Edition)

In need of a docking station for your laptop that will work with Linux? Unable to find a good one that has compatibility with Linux? We can help! Follow along with this list as we go over the best laptop docking stations to use on Linux!

Laptop docking station for Linux

Docking Stations on Linux

Docking stations are hit-or-miss on Linux. Keep in mind that while all devices on this list support Linux, you may need to download drivers beforehand to get the full experience.

To get your hands on the drivers for any of these devices, refer to the product’s website linked in each item. Additionally, keep your Linux OS up to date. Newer Linux kernels often include drivers that make these docking stations work better.

5 Best laptop docking stations to use with Linux: our picks

There are a lot of great docking stations out there for laptop users. But how many of these docks actually support Linux? We’ve answered that question with this list. So, here are our picks for the 5 best laptop docking stations to use with Linux.

1. Anker Docking Station

The Anker Docking Station is fully loaded with excellent features that Linux users are sure to love, including USB-C charging, USB-C data, 4K display support, and even integrated MicroSD and SD card support. It also has some excellent networking connectivity by way of a dedicated gigabit ethernet port.

Pros

  • It comes with a laptop-charging 85-watt USB-C port, as well as an 18-watt power delivery USB-C port, as well as a USB-C data port.
  • It includes tons of helpful USB ports in addition to all of the USB-C ports included.
  • It supports 4k DisplayPort connectivity, as well as 2 4K HDMI ports.
  • It has excellent SDcard and MicroSD card connectivity support.
  • Supports audio in/out.
  • Built-in gigabit ethernet.

Cons

  • The charging feature may not work on all laptops.

2. Plugable USB C Docking Station

Number 2 on our list is the Plugable USB C docking station. It has a lot of great stuff for Linux laptop fans, from its 3 USB 3.0 front panel ports to its easily accessible front audio ports to its rear Rear 60-watt USB-C port that can be used to charge your device and fast ethernet connectivity.

Pros

  • Sports 3 USB 3.0 ports on the front panel for easy storage access.
  • Front audio out and in ports for easy headphone and microphone connectivity.
  • Rear 60-watt USB-C port that can be used to charge your device while connected to the docking station.
  • It comes with two rear USB 2.0 ports for connecting devices that do not need high-speed data transfer.
  • Single HDMI port gives users up to 4k resolution at 30Hz and 2560×1600 and below at 60Hz.
  • It has a fast ethernet port on the back to give your laptop a wired connection.

Cons

  • The USB-C port may not support charging on all laptop models.

3. Dell Display Docking Station

If your Linux laptop is a Dell, you’ll want to take a look at the Dell Display docking station. It has a lot to offer, including three displays at 4k resolution (2 via 4K HDMI and one via Display port) support for USB-A (9-pin), gigabit ethernet, etc. You can even play video games with it if your Dell laptop has a good enough GPU!

Pros

  • It supports three displays at 4k resolution (2 via 4K HDMI and one via Display port.)
  • Front combo audio-in/out port for combo-port headsets as well as headphones.
  • Three fast USB 3.0 slots on the front and a quick 9-pin USB-A port on the back for printers and other devices that support USB-A.
  • It works especially great with Dell laptops such as Inspiron 15 7567 Gaming, 5459; Latitude 13 7350. XPS 13, etc.
  • It has a gigabit ethernet port on the rear for LAN connectivity.

Cons

  • It may not work with non-Dell laptops.
  • The device comes with zero USB-C ports or USB-C charging capabilities.

4. ASUS Docking Station

Many laptop docking stations on the market, though good, are small rectangular boxes that sit on a desk, and users plug in various cords to use the dock. The Asus docking station is different. It’s a laptop stand that also functions as a dock. It also has excellent Linux support and some great features such as dedicated DVI and HDMI, gigabit ethernet, USB 3.0 ports, etc.

Pros

  • The slim, laptop-friendly design allows users to rest their computers directly on the dock, rather than a square box on your desk, like many other docking stations.
  • The device has a dedicated rear audio-in and audio-out ports for microphone and headphones/speaker connectivity.
  • Dedicated DVI and HDMI ports allow for a dual-screen setup (up to 4K).
  • It has two fast USB 3.0 ports on the side for fast USB data transfers.
  • The device supports USB-C connectivity.
  • It has support for Gigabit ethernet.

Cons

  • No DisplayPort support.
  • It only has two USB ports.
  • USB-C port doesn’t support charging.

5. StarTech Docking Station

The StarTech docking station is another excellent dock for Linux users to check out. It has a lot to offer, despite being a bit pricy. For starters, it comes with a 60 Wat USB-C charging port and supports two DisplayPort inputs for high-quality 4K 60 FPS screen performance. It also has a front-panel audio-in/audio-out combo port and support for fast, Gigabit ethernet connectivity. If you’ve looked at 1-4 and still haven’t decided, number 5 could worth considering!

Pros

  • It comes with a 60 Wat USB-C charging port.
  • The device supports two DisplayPort inputs for high-quality 4K 60 FPS screen performance.
  • The docking station has two rear USB 3.0 10 Gbps ports and two rear USB-C data ports.
  • It has a front-panel audio-in/audio-out combo port.
  • Support for fast, Gigabit ethernet connectivity.

Cons

  • USB-C charging capability not compatible with every laptop.
  • No HDMI ports mean users will need to convert DisplayPort to HDMI if they do not have DisplayPort monitors.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over the 5 best docking stations to use with laptops on Linux. That said, there are more than just 5 docking stations out there. So tell us in the comments: what is your favorite Linux laptop docking station to use?

The post 5 Best Laptop Docking Stations to Use with Linux (2021 Edition) appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to play Sony PSP games in Retro Arch on Linux

If you use Retro Arch on Linux and love the Sony PSP, you’ll be happy to know that it is possible to play PSP games on the Linux platform, thanks to the PSP Retro Arch core.

 Sony PSP games Retro Arch  Linux

In this guide, we’ll show you how to install Retro Arch, download the Sony PSP core, and use it to play your favorite PSP games. To get started, grab your favorite PSP ROM files and follow along.

Installing Retro Arch on Linux

To play Sony PSP games in Retro Arch, you must install the program. Retro Arch is available on a wide variety of Linux operating systems. To get it working, open up a terminal window and follow the instructions down below to get the app working.

Note: need a more in-depth guide on how to get Retro Arch working on your Linux PC? Follow our installation guide on how to set up Retro Arch on Linux.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install retroarch

Debian 

sudo apt-get install retroarch

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S retroarch

Fedora

sudo dnf install retroarch

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install retroarch

Snap package

sudo snap install retroarch

Flatpak

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

sudo flatpak install org.libretro.RetroArch 

After installing Retro Arch on Linux, we highly recommend launching the application and going to “Online Updater.” Once in the Retro Arch online updater, use it to update the Retro Arch assets. 

If you do not update assets, Retro Arch may be missing fonts and various icons and will not look right. You may also run into black squares and other unpleasant UI issues.

Enable Core Downloader

By default, when you install Retro Arch on any Linux distribution, the “Core Downloader” is turned off. Having this feature shut off by default is annoying, but it can be re-enabled by doing the following steps.

Step 1: Delete existing Retro Arch configuration files on your computer via the terminal.

sudo rm /etc/retroarch.cfg

rm ~/.config/retroarch/retroarch.cfg

Step 2: Download the new configuration file with the Core Downloader enabled.

cd ~/Downloads
wget https://archive.org/download/retroarch_202104/retroarch.cfg

Step 3: Place the configuration file on your Linux PC. 

cd ~/Downloads

sudo cp retroarch.cfg /etc/

cp retroarch.cfg ~/.config/retroarch/

If the Core Downloader still doesn’t work, try the Flatpak or Snap release of Retro Arch instead.

Installing the Sony PSP core in Retro Arch

Emulation in Retro Arch is possible thanks to “cores.” Cores are library files that provide all of the functionality needed to play games on various systems. Before we can play PSP games in Retro Arch, you will need to download and install the Sony PSP core.

The Sony PSP core is installable through the online updater tool. To do it, launch the Retro Arch app and follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: Go to the Retro Arch main menu in the app using the mouse or Arrow keys on the keyboard (with Enter to select). Once in the menu, find “Online Updater” and select it with the mouse to access the Retro Arch Online Updater.

Step 2: Find the “Core Downloader” section, and select it with the mouse or Arrow keys on the keyboard (and press Enter to access it).

Once you access the “Core Downloader” area, you’ll see a long list of available game consoles, as well as specialized video games (DOOM, QUAKE, etc.) Scroll through the list till you find “Sony – PlayStation Portable.”

Step 3: After hovering over “Sony – PlayStation Portable,” click or press Enter on the keyboard to access the core in Retro Arch. Then, click on (or select with the keyboard) and select “Sony – PlayStation Portable (PPSSPP)” to install the PSP core.

How to play Sony PSP games in Retro Arch on Linux

To play Sony PSP games in Retro Arch, do the following. First, find the “Import Content” button in Retro Arch, and click on it. By selecting this option, you can add your Sony PSP ROMs to the system. 

Adding your PSP ROMs to Retro Arch will make them show up in the app under the console name it was designed to play on. Your PSP ROMs should show up on the sidebar under “Sony PlayStation Portable,” “PSP,” or something similar.

Note: if your ROM files do not show up after a scan, do not worry! You can do a manual scan where you specify the system, the ROM file extension, etc. This feature is located under “Import Content.”

Go to the sidebar, select the Sony PlayStation Portable option, and click on the ROM you wish to play in Retro Arch. After selecting your ROM, look for “Set Core Association.”

Under “Core Association,” set it to “Sony – PlayStation Portable (PPSSPP).” Then, select the “Run” button to start up your PSP game in Retro Arch! 

The post How to play Sony PSP games in Retro Arch on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.04

Ubuntu 21.04 is here! With it comes exciting new updates to the Ubuntu desktop, the Ubuntu Linux kernel, as well as many new features that users are sure to love. In this guide, we’ll go over how you can upgrade your system to 21.04.

upgrade to Ubuntu 21.04

Upgrade to 21.04 – GUI

If you’re planning on upgrading from Ubuntu 20.10 to 21.04 Hirsuite Hippo, the best way to go about it is through the GUI. The GUI is very hands-off and doesn’t require too much compared to the terminal.

To start the upgrade, press the Win key on the keyboard. This action will bring up the Ubuntu Gnome search window. Using the search box, type in “Software Updater,” and click on the icon with the name “Software Updater.”

By selecting this icon, the Ubuntu Software Updater will open and search Ubuntu.com for the latest updates. This search will take some time. After a bit, you’ll be prompted to update your Ubuntu PC if you haven’t already.

Following the update, reboot your PC. Then, log back in and re-launch the Ubuntu Software Updater. Once it is open, you’ll see, “The software on this computer is up to date. However, Ubuntu 21.04 is now available (You Have 20.10).”

Click on the “Upgrade” button to start the upgrade. If you do not see this notification, you need to force it. To force it, open up a terminal window and enter the command below.

Note: you can open up a terminal window on Ubuntu by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or by searching for “Terminal” in the app menu.

update-manager -d

After clicking on the “Upgrade” button, you’ll be asked to enter your password. Do so, and select the “Authenticate” button to continue. Once you enter your password, you’ll see the “Release Notes” page for 21.04. Read through these notes. When done, click on the “Upgrade” button.

Upon clicking on the “Upgrade” button on the release notes page, Ubuntu will begin configuring your Ubuntu system for Ubuntu 21.04 (downloading new packages, setting up new software channels, etc.)

Once Ubuntu is done configuring your system for the upgrade, you will see a window. This window says, “Do you want to start the upgrade?” Click on the “Start Upgrade” button to continue.

Upon clicking the upgrade button, Ubuntu will begin transitioning your existing system to Ubuntu 21.04. This process will take quite a long time, depending on your network connection. Sit back, and allow the “Distribution Upgrade” window to complete.

When the “Distribution Upgrade” window finishes, it will restart your Ubuntu PC. Upon logging back into your Ubuntu system, you will be using Ubuntu 21.04! Enjoy!

Upgrade to 21.04 – Terminal

If you prefer to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.04 from 20.10 from the terminal, you can. To start, open up a terminal window on the Ubuntu Linux desktop. To open up a terminal window on Ubuntu, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the desktop. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu and launch it that way.

Once the terminal window is open, you’ll need to update your existing Ubuntu system. 20.10 must be up to date before attempting to upgrade to a new release, as breakages could occur. 

To upgrade Ubuntu 20.10 to the latest packages, execute the following apt update command. Then, use the apt upgrade command to finish everything up. Keep in mind that this upgrade could take a few minutes.

sudo apt update

sudo apt upgrade 

After Ubuntu 20.10 is up to date, you’ll need to do a dist-upgrade. This command will install any packages to Ubuntu 20.10 that may have been held back for one reason or another. 

sudo apt dist-upgrade

Allow the dist-upgrade command to run its course. If there’s nothing to install, no big deal. Running this command on Ubuntu 20.10 is just a precaution but a necessary one.

From here, you’ll need to change your software sources from Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy to Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute. To do this, execute the following sed command below.

sudo sed -i 's/groovy/hirsute/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

Once software sources have been changed over, execute the apt update command once again. Running this will allow Ubuntu to refresh software sources and change over repos from 20.10 to 21.04.

sudo apt update

Following the update command, re-run the apt upgrade command. This command will install Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute packages over 20.10 Groovy ones. 

sudo apt upgrade

Next, re-run the dist-upgrade command. This command will install all available Ubuntu 21.04 packages, including ones held back by the upgrade command. 

sudo apt dist-upgrade

Reboot your Linux PC. When you log back in, launch a terminal window. Then, execute the apt autoremove command to remove obsolete packages.

sudo apt autoremove 

Once all obsolete packages have been removed, you’ll be ready to use Ubuntu 21.04! Enjoy!

The post How to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.04 appeared first on AddictiveTips.

4 Best External SSDs for Linux Users to Pick in 2021

Are you on the lookout for a new external SSD hard drive to use on Linux? Can’t figure out what to use for your storage needs? We can help! Here’s our list of the 4 best external SSDs to use on Linux! 

Best external SSD for Linux

SSDs on Linux

Before you buy an SSD to use on Linux, understand that you will need to be using a Linux filesystem format to get the most out of it. While excellent and compatible with Linux, all of the devices on this list are formatted in NTFS, a Microsoft Windows format.

To get the most out of your external SSD on Linux, please check out our guide on optimizing your SSD. Be sure also to read our guide on the best Linux filesystems for SSDS.

Best External SSDs for Linux Users (Our picks)

There are so many external SSDs out there with Linux support. That being said, there are many mediocre external SSDs, and the average user might not know how to tell the good from the bad. That’s why we’ve made this list. Here are our top picks for the best external SSDs to use on Linux.

1. SAMSUNG T7 Portable SSD 1TB

Samsung is the undisputed king of solid-state drives, and for a good reason. They have incredible read and write speed, and they’re affordable, too (unless you opt for massive storage space). When it comes to external SSDs to use on Linux, look no further than the SAMSUNG T7 Portable SSD.

Why? For starters, the T7 is a superfast SSD with ample storage space, starting at 1 TB in space and going up to 2 TB. Secondly, the device supports both standard USB connectivity and USB-C with included cables, and the drive can optionally be encrypted using Samsung’s software.

Pros

  • Superfast SSD with ample storage space, starting at 1 TB in space and going up to 2 TB.
  • Samsung includes their own SSDs in the product, which are the fastest, most reliable drives on the market.
  • Despite the extensive data storage size, the price is extremely reasonable.
  • The drive supports data transfer rates of up to 1050 MBs per second, 4.9 times faster than external HDDs.
  • The drive can optionally be encrypted using Samsung’s software (which is compatible with Linux).
  • The device supports both standard USB connectivity as well as USB-C with included cables.

Cons

  • The filesystem is formatted in NTFS, which is compatible with Linux but not great for those who only plan to use Linux.

2. SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD

If Samsung isn’t your style, another excellent choice for a portable Linux SSD is the SanDisk Extreme. It’s highly mobile, and it even has a built-in carabiner hook for easy transportation. Also, it comes in a wide variety of storage options, ensuring you have enough space to keep all your stuff.

The Sandisk Extreme is excellent and super-fast, too with rates of up to 1050 MB per second, support for USB-C, as well as a shock-resistant design that protects your data from accidentally dropping it.

Pros

  • The design has a built-in carabiner hook for easy transportation.
  • The external hard drive supports both standard USB connectivity as well as USB-C with included cables.
  • It comes in a wide variety of storage options, starting at 250 GB and ending at a massive 4 TBs.
  • It has a blistering fast transfer rate of up to 1050 MB per second (USB-C).
  • Shock-resistant design protects your data from accidental drops.

Cons

  • The drive is meant to be a USB-C device and includes a USB adapter rather than two separate cables. This is a bummer for those who do not want to use USB-C and want a good quality cable.
  • The drive comes formatted in NTFS, the Windows filesystem format. Linux can read it, but Linux users may need to reformat it to get the most out of it manually.

3. WD 1TB My Passport External Portable Solid State Drive

Aside from Samsung, Western Digital makes pretty good SSDs, and their entire product line is a testament to that. This WD 1TB external SSD is no different. Excellent quality and works perfectly on any Linux system. 

Linux users looking for a great external should take notice of the My Passport, as it is pretty impressive, from its super-fast read and write speeds (1050 Mbps read and 1000 Mbps write) to its support for 256-bit encryption and USB connectivity. If you require an excellent external SSD on Linux, give this WD 1 TB My Passport a look!

Pros

  • The enclosure comes in a wide variety of colors, and customers can choose the case that matches their personality the best. 
  • The drive inside is a super speedy NVMe chip-based SSD that delivers incredible speeds of 1050 Mbps read, and 1000 Mbps write. 
  • It supports password 256-bit encryption technology.
  • The SSD enclosure is shock-resistant, and your data is protected from accidental drops.
  • It supports traditional USB connectivity as well as USB-C. Both cables are included, so there is no need to purchase extra accessories.

Cons

  • It comes formatted in NTFS, which works on Linux but isn’t a great filesystem to store data on a Linux system. Users may need to manually format the drive before getting the most out of it.
  • Unclear if the encryption feature is supported on Linux.

4. Seagate Expansion SSD 500GB Solid State Drive

Are you on a budget? Can’t get something that will break the bank but need a reliable, speedy external SSD for use on Linux? If so, take a look at the Seagate Expansion SSD. It’s 500 GBs, and though slower than Samsung or Sandisk, or WD, it offers excellent performance and reliability. 

The Seagate Expansion SSD is pretty impressive. It comes with a super-fast USB 3.0 cable that delivers decent read and write speeds over any computer (coming in at 400 Mbps). It also comes in a tough, rugged shock-resistant case which is sure to protect your data.

Pros

  • Super-fast USB 3.0 cable delivers a respectable 400 Mbps read speed and a great write speed as well. 
  • The 500 GB model is incredibly affordable. Those who want a quality external hard drive from a trusted brand like Seagate can get one without breaking the bank.
  • The drive can work on USB-C devices, and Seagate has an adapter available for those who need it.
  • The tough, rugged shock-resistant case means your data is protected during traveling.

Cons

  • The USB-C cable adapter is not included, and users need to buy it separately. 
  • The SSD, though fast and more affordable, is a traditional SATA SSD and delivers much slower rates than NVMe portables from other brands.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over 4 excellent SSDs to use with Linux. However, there are more than 4 external SSDs out there on the market. So, what is your favorite external SSD hard drive to use on Linux? Tell us in the comments below!

The post 4 Best External SSDs for Linux Users to Pick in 2021 appeared first on AddictiveTips.

The 5 Best NVMe SSDs to Use with Linux (2021 Edition)

Are you in need of a good NVMe SSD to use on your Linux system but are having trouble finding the perfect one? If so, this list is for you. Follow along as we go over some of the best NVMe SSDs you can use with Linux!

Best NVMe SSD for Linux

SSDs on Linux

Using NVMe SSDs on Linux is excellent, thanks to developers’ hard work in the Linux community. Thanks to them, NVMe SSDs work fantastic on the platform. However, you should know that you may need to manually enable certain SSD features on your Linux system to get the most out of your drive.

For more information on how to get the most out of your SSD on Linux, be sure to check out our guide on how to optimize SSDs on Linux. It’ll walk you through steps you can take to make your SSD work the best it possibly can on the Linux platform.

Best NVMe SSDs to use with Linux – our picks

There are hundreds of excellent NVMe SSDs hitting the market every day, and each one is better than the last. If you’re tired of sifting through NVMe SSDs to find the best one to use on your Linux PC, check out our picks for the best NVMe SSDs to use with Linux. 

1. Samsung (MZ-V7E1T0BW) 970 EVO SSD

The Samsung 970 Evo is the pinnacle of NVMe SSDs and a favorite in the PC gaming community, as well as computer enthusiasts in general.

The reason? It’s blisteringly fast with read and write speeds at 3,500 Mbps and 2,500 Mbps respectively, has excellent thermal protection to keep it cool, and is compatible with all available Linux file systems. Users can even use Samsung’s Magician Software to manage the device on Linux!

Pros

  • It has impressive read and write speeds with 3,500 Mbps read and 2,500 Mbps. Perfect for those looking for a hyper-fast SSD to use on Linux.
  • Samsung’s “Dynamic Thermal Guard” means this SSD keeps cool under heavy load, avoiding performance issues.
  • The SSD works with Samsung Magician Software, which can be used on Linux.
  • There are a large number of storage options available, from 250 GB to 2 TB.

Cons

  • This SSD, while excellent, the extensive storage options that are pricey. If you’re on a budget, it may be best to look to other options.

2. Silicon Power 1TB NVMe

Silicon Power is no Samsung. Still, its 1 TB NVMe offering is perfect for Linux users looking for ample storage space on a budget, as it comes with excellent read/write speeds and data performance. The only catch is, it doesn’t come with good heat dissipation technology, but the price per GB makes it worth it!

Pros

  • It has support for PCIe Gen3x4, which means it’ll work in a wide variety of modern motherboards without issues.
  • Blistering fast read and write speeds clocking in at 3,400 Mbps read and 3,000 Mbps write, respectively. 
  • High capacity means users can store tons and tons of data and access it at breakneck speeds.
  • It uses 3D NAND for superior data performance.

Cons

  • Lacking good heat dissipation technology means this SSD may overheat at times under load.

3. Crucial P5 3D NAND NVMe Internal SSD

Crucial is known for its excellent SSDs, and the Crucial P5 is no exception. It’s a great little SSD with Crucial’s “Innovative 3D NAND and cutting-edge controller technology” for outstanding performance, as well as dynamic write acceleration, and error correction, and excellent storage choices. If you need an all-around great NVMe SSD, check this one out!

Pros

  • The SSD uses Crucial’s “Innovative 3D NAND and cutting-edge controller technology” for superior performance under load.
  • Very fast read and write performance, with 3400 Mbps read, and 3000 Mbps write.
  • It has support for dynamic write acceleration and error correction. 
  • It comes with built-in thermal protection.
  • It has a wide variety of storage options, starting at 250 GB and maxing out at 2 TB.

Cons

  • Crucial’s ” Executive Storage” software that can be used with the Crucial P5 doesn’t have Linux support.

4. Western Digital WD Blue SN550 NVMe Internal SSD

Western Digital claims that the WD Blue SN550 NVMe Internal SSD is “over 4 times faster” than their SATA SSDs, and it’s true. If you require an excellent NVMe SSD for Linux, it’s one of the best. Pop this NVMe SSD into your Linux PC; it’ll be blazing fast. Why? The drive supports read speeds up to 2,600 Mbps and write speeds up to 1,800 Mbps, and the latest 3D NAND storage technology. 

Pros

  • It is “over 4 times faster” than Western Digital SATA SSDs, offering impressive performance with reading speeds up to 2,600 Mbps and write speeds up to 1,800 Mbps.
  • It has a wide selection of storage options, starting at 250 GB and going as large as 2 TB.
  • It supports PCIe Gen 3 x4 and M.2 2280, enabling it to be used on modern motherboards quite easily.
  • It comes with 3D NAND, which means faster data performance under load.

Cons

  • Lacking heat dissipation technology which could mean overheating under heavy use.

5. PNY CS1030 M.2 NVMe SSD

PNY CS1030 M.2 NVMe SSD is one of the best budget NVMe SSDs out there for Linux users to check out. For starters, it has reasonably fast speeds with write speeds coming in at 1,900 Mbps and read speeds up to 2,100 Mbp. It also offers a decent amount of storage choices, starting at 250 GB, 500 GB, and 1 TB, at a reasonable price. What’s not to love?

Pros

  • Reasonably fast speeds with write speeds coming in at 1,900 Mbps and read speeds up to 2,100 Mbps.
  • Support for NVMe Gen 3 and PCIe 3 x4.
  • It offers a decent amount of storage choices, starting at 250 GB, 500 GB, and 1 TB. 

Cons

  • Lacking heat dissipation technology which may cause problems under heavy use.

NVMe SSD on Linux: CONCLUSION

In this list, we covered the 5 best NVMe SSDs to use on Linux. However, there are more than 5 NVMe SSDs out there.

Tell us in the comment section below: What is your favorite NVMe SSD to use on Linux?

The post The 5 Best NVMe SSDs to Use with Linux (2021 Edition) appeared first on AddictiveTips.