The Best Wireless Mouse for Linux Laptops (Reviews) in 2021

Are you in the market for a new wireless mouse to use on your Linux laptop? Unsure about what to purchase? We can help! Follow along with our list as we go over the 5 best wireless mice for Linux laptops!

Best Wireless Mouse Linux

Wireless mouse compatibility on Linux

Wireless mice have always worked pretty well on Linux, thanks to the hard work that Linux kernel developers do. With their hard work, 99% of wireless mice will work on Linux out of the box.

That said, you should know that if you choose to purchase a mouse to use on Linux, the specialized software that many manufacturers make to allow consumers to configure and customize their mice will not work. Instead, you will have to rely on apps like Piper and others.

Best Wireless Mouse (Linux)

There are a lot of wireless mice out there? But what ones are the best to use on Linux? Here are our picks for the best wireless mice for Linux laptops!

1. Logitech M705 Wireless Marathon Mouse for PC

Logitech is the king of wireless mice, and the M705 is no exception. It’s an excellent quality mouse. Best of all, it works great on Linux right out of the box and has useful features such as programmable buttons, a DPI switcher, front/back buttons, and an astonishing promise of 3 years of battery life.

If you’re unsure about what mouse to go with for your Linux laptop, the M705 is a great option. Best of all, Logitech enjoys excellent Linux support, and you’ll even be able to customize the buttons with Piper!

Pros

  • The shape of the mouse is ergonomic and designed to be held in hand for extended periods.
  • The Logitech M705 can go up to 3 years on a single battery charge.
  • The mouse has multiple programmable buttons as well as comfortable, rubberized grips on the side. 
  • The mouse’s metal scroll wheel means responsive scrolling that won’t give out in a couple of years.
  • Works on Linux out of the box with zero drivers required.

Cons

  • The Logitech app that users can download to customize further their mouse only works on Windows.
  • Batteries not included.

2. Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed Wireless Gaming Mouse

Razer enjoys excellent support on Linux thanks to the open-source community, and the Razer Basilisk X Hyperspeed wireless gaming mouse is no exception. Thanks to the OpenRazer Project, it works perfectly on a wide variety of Linux operating systems. 

Linux support isn’t the only thing to talk about when it comes to this mouse, though. It also has some seriously impressive specifications, such as programmable buttons, a DPI switcher with DPI levels of up to 16k, and dual connectivity modes. If you’re a gamer in need of a great wireless mouse for your laptop, do yourself a favor and check out the Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed!

Pros

  • They are supported on Linux with the help of projects like OpenRazer, Polychromatic, RazerGenie, etc.
  • Ergonomic, gaming style shape with many programmable buttons and a rest on the side for extra comfort.
  • It can be set to DPI levels of up to 16,000 and has a built-in DPI switcher.
  • Supports up to 450 hours of battery life.
  • Can connect to Linux in both Bluetooth and 2.4 GHz wireless mode via a USB dongle.

Cons

  • The mouse may be too big for some.

3. VicTsing MM057 2.4G Wireless Portable Mobile Mouse

The VicTsnig MM057 2.4 GHz wireless mouse is number 3 on our list of wireless mice to use on Linux, and it’s not hard to see why. It’s just about the best budget mouse anyone can buy, with excellent features such as programmable buttons, a DPI switch (with DPI levels as high as 2400), 15 hours of battery life, and much more.

If you’re out to save money but are in need of a great wireless mouse for your Linux laptop, the VicTsnig MM057 2.4 GHz wireless mouse is a great option to consider. 

Pros

  • The comfortable ergonomic design of the mouse is perfect for extended use periods.
  • It supports a maximum DPI of 2400 DPI and has a dpi switcher on the top of the mouse that users can click to swap between DPI configurations quickly.
  • Comes with many programmable buttons on the mouse, including side back/forward buttons.
  • Supports up to 15 hours of battery life.

Cons

  • It is powered by a single AA battery that is not included.

4. WisFox 2.4G Wireless Mouse

The WisFox 2.4G wireless mouse is another excellent budget mouse to consider for your Linux laptop. For a minimal cost, you’re getting a whole lot of great stuff, like a beautiful ergonomic shape, 6 programmable buttons, a DPI switcher, and a pretty decent battery life. 

If you’ve been on the lookout for a good, comfy mouse that won’t break the bank and works on Linux out of the box, the WisFox 2.4G wireless mouse is a great option to consider.

Pros

  • The beautiful, ergonomic design makes holding it in the hand very pleasant. Rubberized grips on the side make the experience even better.
  • It has 6 programmable buttons that users can customize, including back/forward buttons on the side.
  • The device works well on Linux on a wide variety of Linux operating systems out of the box. 
  • Has a built-in DPI switcher button with a maximum DPI of 1600.

Cons

  • It is powered by a single AA battery, which is not included in the packaging.

5. Jelly Comb 2.4G Slim Wireless Mouse

The Jelly Comb 2.4G Slim Wireless Mouse is a great mouse to use on Linux if you’re in the mood for something stylish. It’s flat, compact, and fancy looking, much like an Apple mouse. However, style isn’t all it’s got. The Jelly Comb also has some great features, such as DPI switching, a 15-meter wireless range, and decent battery life!

If you love fancy mice and want one for your Linux desktop, the Jelly Comb 2.4G Slim Wireless Mouse is perfect. Best of all, it won’t break the bank!

Pros

  • A flat, compact design makes it perfect for traveling.
  • The comfortable material the mouse is built with makes it a delight to use for extended periods.
  • Works on Linux out of the box with no drivers required and has a wireless range of up to 15 meters.
  • Supports a DPI setting of up to 1600.

Cons

  • It is powered by a single AA battery that does not come included with the packaging.
  • No back/forward buttons on the side.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over 5 excellent wireless mice to use with your Linux laptop. However, there are a lot more than 5 wireless mice out there today.

So tell us! What wireless mouse do you use on your Linux laptop?

The post The Best Wireless Mouse for Linux Laptops (Reviews) in 2021 appeared first on AddictiveTips.

4 Best USB-C Expansion Cards for Linux (Reviews) in 2021

If you’re in the market for a USB-C expansion card for your Linux PC but can’t figure out what to buy, you’re not alone. There are so many USB-C expansion cards for sale these days it is hard to tell what is good and what isn’t.

We’ll go over the 4 best USB-C expansion cards to use on your Linux PC in this list. Hopefully, this list will help you make an informed decision on your purchase.

Best Linux USB-C Expansion Cards

USB-C expansion cards on Linux

USB-C expansion cards are relatively new compared to older USB 3 and 2 expansion cards. As a result, some USB-C expansion cards might not be compatible with specific versions of Linux, especially those on older Linux kernels.

We’ve done our best to sort out the best USB-C expansion cards out there in this list. Ones that should work on a majority of Linux OSes with no issue.

Best USB-C expansion cards for Linux

Here are our picks for the best USB-C expansion cards for Linux!

1. Sonnet Allegro USB-C 4-Port PCIe (USB3C-4PM-E)

The Sonnet Allegro USB-C expansion card is the one to get, bar none. It’s one of the few USB-C expansion cards with more than 2 ports out there right now, and that’ can’t be understated. It’s tough to find a card with more than just two ports, for some reason. However, the ports aren’t the only draw. It also has some impressive specs like 10 Gbps data transfer speed, SSD raid support, and much more.

If you’re in the market for a good USB-C expansion card to use on Linux and you can afford to spend a little bit, take a look at the Sonnet Allegro USB-C expansion card. You won’t regret it!

Pros

  • Compatibility with Linux out of the box, no need to install any drivers or anything of the sort.
  • The Sonnet Allegro USB-C is one of few USB-C PCIe hubs on the market that offers users 4 ports instead of 2. Having 4 ports is very handy and will allow users to use more devices simultaneously over USB-C.
  • All USB-C ports are powered, and no need to plug in an external power source.
  • The device is optimized for Thunderbolt devices and even supports things like SSDs and SSD raids over USB-C.
  • Blistering fast data transfer rates at up to 4x faster than USB 3.1.

Cons

  • A tad on the expensive side, and no low-profile bracket.

2. PCI-E Card YEELIYA USB 3.1Gen 2 (10Gbps)

Out of all of the 2 port PCI USB-C expansion cards, the YEELIYA card comes out on top. The reason? The manufacturer doesn’t waffle on Linux support. It flat out works, and that’s that. No special circumstances need to be met. It also has pretty good specs, such as USB 3.1 and 2.0 device support, fast data transfer speeds, support for hot-swapping, and more for a reasonable price.

Those in the market for a USB-C expansion card should give the YEELIYA expansion card a look over, especially if you’re on a budget.

Pros

  • It supports all USB 3.1 and 2.0 devices (provided the user has the appropriate adapter) and comes with a low-profile bracket.
  • Works on Linux out of the box without any need for a third-party driver.
  • Has support for device hot-swapping, which will make it easier to insert and remove devices on the fly.
  • Impressive data transfer speed coming in at about 10 Gbps, much faster than USB 3.1 or 2.0.

Cons

  • The expansion card only has 2 ports to work with.

3. LTERIVER PCI Express USB 3.1 Gen2 Type C 

Coming in at number 3 on our list of the best USB-C expansion cards is the LTERIVER PCI Express. It is an affordable, high-speed USB-C expansion card that will work on Linux (though the manufacturer will not offer official tech support). It has impressive features such as a data transfer speed that can hit 16 Gpbs, supports USB 3.0 and 2.0 devices, and much more.

The LTERIVER PCI Express USB-C expansion card is very affordable and does work pretty well on most Linux operating systems. If you can get past the fact that the manufacturer won’t offer official tech support, it is worth checking out.

Pros

  • Speedy data transfer at 10 Gbps (standard for USB-C) but can do a total of 16 Gbps max.
  • The device is entirely powered by the motherboard when plugged in over PCIe, and there is no need to plug in an external power source.
  • It comes with Linux support via the manufacturer and should work out of the box thanks to the Linux kernel’s stellar driver updates.
  • The device is compatible with USB 3.1 and 2.0 devices as long as the user has the correct adapter and comes with a low-profile bracket.

Cons

  • The manufacturer will not commit to supporting Linux users and claims that the user is “on their own” due to how often the Linux kernel is updated.
  • Only two ports.

4. FebSmart 2X 10Gbps USB-C Ports PCIE USB 3.1 Gen 2

The FebSmart 2X is another excellent 2-port USB-C expansion card that works pretty well with Linux (for the most part.) Like many other expansion cards out there, the FebSmart 2X delivers very fast data transfer speeds at 10 Gpbs. However, it can go as high as 16 Gbps. It also has other excellent features, such as support for USB 3.1 and 2.0 devices, and much more.

If you’re in the market for an excellent USB-C expansion card and don’t mind the partial Linux support, the FebSmart 2X is a great device and is worth picking up.

Pros

  • It is backward compatible with a wide variety of USB 3.1 and USB 2.0 devices as long as the user has a USB to USB-C adapter present.
  • The device can transfer data at speeds of 10 Gbps and going as fast as 16 Gbps.
  • Works out of the box on Linux, and the manufacturer claims it should work on the most “mainstream kernel.”
  • It comes with a low-profile PCIe bracket to save space inside of your PC.

Cons

  • It only comes with two ports on the back. 
  • The manufacturer supports Linux, but only “mainstream versions,” which could exclude users on Linux operating systems that don’t update quickly.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over the 4 best USB-C expansion cards for Linux.  However, new USB-C expansion cards are coming out all the time.

So tell us, what USB-C expansion card do you use on your Linux PC? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

The post 4 Best USB-C Expansion Cards for Linux (Reviews) in 2021 appeared first on AddictiveTips.

5 Best Linux Server Hard Drives (Reviews) of 2021

Are you on the lookout for new hard drives to use in your Linux server or NAS? Having trouble figuring out what drives you should buy? We can help! Follow along as we go over the 5 best Linux server hard drives to get.

Best Linux server hard drive

Linux hard drive compatibility

If you plan to get a new hard drive to use in your Linux server, home NAS, project server, or media server, you should be aware of Linux hard drive compatibility. Unlike Windows Server, you won’t be able to use any fancy firmware upgrade tools or manufacturer-created applications to monitor your drives.

When you buy a new hard drive for your Linux server, keep in mind that these particular tools will be unusable. However, with that in mind, Linux is in a good place when it comes to hard drives and servers. 99% of hard drives on the market today will work with Linux out of the box. 

Best Linux server hard drives 

There are many great hard drives out there that work fantastic in Linux servers, NAS devices, etc. That said, some drives are better than others. This list aims to show you the absolute best ones you can get to use on your Linux system.

1. Seagate IronWolf NAS Internal Hard Drive

The Seagate IronWolf is our top pick for the best hard drive to use with Linux. The reason? It comes with a tremendous amount of storage options, from 1 TB all the way to 18 TB for starters. Secondly, it has a very respectable workload shelf-life of 300 TB per year, has 7200 RPM drive speed, compatibility with storage array configurations, and much more.

Suffice it to say, if you’re on the lookout for an excellent hard drive to use on your Linux server, the Seagate Iron Wolf NAS internal hard drive should be first on the list.

Pros

  • Seagate IronWolf NAS has a massive variety of storage options for consumers to choose from, starting at 1 TB and going as large as 18 TB, making it a monster for a home server or NAS storage solution.
  • It comes with Seagate’s “AgileArray,” which makes the IronWolf perfectly compatible with things like RAID and other multi-drive arrays.
  • Supports a massive workload shelf-life, coming in at 300 TB per year.
  • The IronWold has built-in rotational vibration sensors to prevent lag in performance.
  • 7200 RPM drive speed means massive read/write speed and performance, which is critical for a NAS or home server.

Cons

  • In some cases, the IronWolf drive may be 5800 RPM rather than the advertised 7200 RPM.

2. Western Digital WD Red NAS Internal Hard Drive

The WD Red NAS hard drive is second on our list of picks for the best hard drives to use on Linux servers. Under the hood, it has a workload rate of 180 TB a year, support for storage sizes of up to 6 TB, has a read speed of up to 180 megabytes per second, and a good drive speed clocking in at 5400 RPMs.

WD Reds are used a lot in storage systems for their reliability and sturdiness. If you’re looking to build a NAS or data server running Linux, you will do well to take a look at the Western Digital WD Red NAS internal hard drive.

Pros

  • The Western Digital 4TB NAS drive comes in various sizes, starting at 2 TB and ending at  6 TB.
  • It has a read speed of 180 Megabytes per second, perfect for a Network Attached Storage solution or home server.
  • The drive supports a massive workload rate of 180 TB a year.
  • Built and tested to run large amounts of data through it means it is reliable.

Cons

  • NAS drives can be slower than general-purpose hard drives.

3. Western Digital 2TB WD Gold

The Western Digital 2 TB WD Gold hard drive is 3rd on our list of drives to get for Linux. It’s a high-performance hard drive designed for the enterprise, with impressive features like 7200 RPM drive speed, 200 Mbps read speed, a 500 TB per year workload rate, and more. However, it’ll work just as well in a Linux server project in your home.

If you need a high-performance drive for your Linux system, look no further. The Western Digital 2 TB WD Gold hard drive is the right one for the job.

Pros

  • The drive is Enterprise-grade and an all-around fast hard drive that clocks in at 7200 RPMs. Perfect for both fast data delivery as well as storage.
  • It has a read speed of 200 megabytes per second, which is more than adequate for accessing data at a reasonable speed on a home server or NAS.
  • It has a tremendous workload rate of up to 500 TB per year, ensuring the drive will last for quite a long time.
  • WD Gold has enhanced reliability with a 2.5 million hour MTBF (Mean time between failures) rating.

Cons

  • Only 2 TB in size and larger versions are hard to find.

4. WD SE 2TB Datacenter Hard Disk Drive

Coming in at number 4 in our list of picks is the WD SE 2TB Datacenter hard drive. It’s an impressive drive with enticing features, such as a fast drive speed (7200 RPM),  a read speed of up to 124 Mbps, a write speed of up to 104 Mbps, and much more.

The WD SE 2TB Datacenter hard drive is a drive designed for high-class enterprise environments such as data centers, server farms — essentially everything involving handling high performance and data. So, if you require a speedy hard drive that can handle your data, this is the one to grab.

Pros

  • Fast drive speed clocking in at 7200 RPMs.
  • Uses WD’s “StableTrac” and “RAFF” for better vibration tolerance.
  • It has a good workload tolerance of up to 180 TB per year, so it should last quite a long time before failure.
  • Has a read speed of up to 124 Megabytes per second, and a write speed of up to 104  megabytes per second.

Cons

  • The only storage option available for this drive is 2 TB, which may not be enough for some.

5. Western Digital WD Blue PC Hard Drive

If you’re on a budget and in need of a good hard drive to use on your Linux server or NAS project, the Western Digital WD Blue PC hard drive is a good choice. It’s a great general-purpose HDD with decent specs such as 180 Mbps read, decently large storage size choices (up to 6 TB,) and a respectable drive speed for the price.

While the WD Blue isn’t nearly as impressive as some of the other WD drives on this list, it more than makes up for it for how inexpensive it is. If you need a good drive for little, do check it out.

Pros

  • General-purpose HDD with large storage space options. The WD Blue can be used in a wide variety of server applications.
  • WD Blue has multiple hard drive speed options, which means there’s something for everyone, offering up 7200 RPMs for the 1 TB model and 5400 RPM for larger storage sizes.
  • WD Blue is very inexpensive compared to other hard drives in the Western Digital hard drive line, perfect for those on a budget.
  • A decent read rate (180 Megabytes per second) means using the drive on a home server or NAS is doable.

Cons

  • Users will need to trade higher data capacity for faster speeds, as larger drives are slower.

Linux HDDs: Conclusion

In this list, we went over the best Linux server hard drives to get.

What hard drives do you use in your Linux server or NAS?

Tell us in the comment section below!

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Ubuntu: format SD card [Guide]

Are you new to Ubuntu? Do you need to format your SD card but can’t figure out how to do it? If so, this guide is for you! Follow along as we go over a few ways you can format SD cards on Linux.

Ubuntu: format SD card

Ubuntu: format SD card – Gparted

One way to format an SD card on Ubuntu is with the Gparted partition editor. It’s an excellent graphical tool that allows users to modify any storage device attached to Ubuntu, even SD cards.

To get started, you must install the Gparted partition editor on Ubuntu. To get the Gparted partition editor working on your Ubuntu PC, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu.

Once the terminal window is open, use the apt install command to install the “gparted” package to your computer.

sudo apt install gparted

When the Gparted app is installed on your system, open up the app menu and search for “Gparted.” Then, follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to format your SD card.

Step 1: Connect your SD card to a USB reader and plug it into your PC. Or, if you have a built-in SD card reader, insert it into the reader slot.

Step 2: Once the SD card is inserted into your Ubuntu PC, go back to Gparted. Look for the “Gparted” menu at the top of the window and click on it to reveal its options.

Inside the Gparted menu, find the “Refresh Devices” option, and click it with the mouse. By clicking on “Refresh Devices,” Gparted will re-scan all storage devices connected to Ubuntu and pick up your SD card.

Step 3: Click on the storage menu in the right-hand corner of the Gparted app. Look for your SD card. Can’t find your SD card? To find it, remember the size of the SD card and match it with the correct one in the storage menu.

Step 4: After selecting your SD card in the storage menu, Gparted will display your SD card partition layout. From here, select all partitions with the mouse and press the Delete button.

Note: if you cannot delete partitions from your SD card, the partitions are mounted. To unmount a partition in Gparted, right-click on it and select the “Unmount” option.

By pressing Delete, you’ll see the partitions removed from the layout. However, they’re not gone from the SD card yet, as the “Apply” button must be selected to confirm the removal.

Step 5: Find the “Apply” button in Gparted and select it. By clicking on the “Apply” button, Gparted will remove all partitions you chose to delete in step 4.

Step 6: In Gparted, find the “unallocated” space, and right-click on it with the mouse. Then, select the “New” button to create a new partition.

Step 7: After clicking the “New” button to create a new partition on your SD card in Gparted, the “Create new Partition” window will appear. In this window, find “File system” and select the file system you prefer to use.

Don’t know what file system to use for your SD card? Select NTFS. NTFS is the Windows file system and works on both Ubuntu as well as Windows.

Click “Add” to add the partition.

Step 8: Once you’ve added your new partition to the SD Card in Gparted, click on the “Apply” button a second time to write the changes to the disk.

When Gparted finishes, close the app and eject your SD card. 

Ubuntu: format SD card – Gnome Disk Utility

Another way to format an SD card on Ubuntu is with the Gnome Disk Utility. It’s a very straightforward app, and it can handle most hard drives, USB flash drives, and even SD cards.

To get started, you must install Gnome Disk Utility. Open up a terminal on the Ubuntu desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Once the terminal window is open, use the apt install command below to install the app.

sudo apt install gnome-disk-utility

After installing Gnome Disk Utility, open up the app by searching for “Disks” in your app menu. When the app is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below to format your SD card.

Step 1: Plug your SD card into a USB reader and into your computer. Or, insert your SD card into the SD card reader slot.

Step 2: Navigate to the left-hand sidebar and click on your SD card with the mouse.

Step 3: After clicking on the SD card with the mouse, Gnome Disk Utility will display the SD card. From here, find the Gnome Disk Utility menu and click on it with the mouse.

Can’t find the menu? It’s to the left of the minimize button.

Step 4: Inside the Gnome Disk Utility menu, select the “Format Disk” option. From there, you’ll be able to format your SD card to a new file system.

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How to remove a remove apt repository from Debian

Do you have an Apt repository on your Debian Linux PC that you want to delete? Can’t figure out how to do it? We can help! Follow along as we go over two ways you can remove Apt repositories from Debian!

Remove apt repository – Text editor

The easiest way to remove an Apt software repository from Debian Linux is through a text editor. Why? You can easily open up your Debian Apt sources list file in a text editor tool and turn things on and off without a lot of trouble. 

To get started, open up a terminal window. A terminal window is required for editing software sources on Debian, as they are system files. Users aren’t able to edit these system files without elevated privileges. 

Open up a terminal window on your Debian Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Or, search for “Terminal” in the app menu on your computer to launch the app. Once the terminal window is open, use the su – command to log into the root account.

Note: if you have sudo set up on your Debian Linux PC, you can execute sudo -s to gain root terminal access rather than using the su command.

su -

Once the terminal session has root access, we can open up the /etc/apt/sources.list file for editing purposes. In this guide, we’ll make use of the Nano text editor. Nano is highly user-friendly, pre-installed on most Debian Linux systems, and works right in the terminal.

nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Inside the Nano text editor, look for the software repository you wish to disable. In this example, we are disabling the VirtualBox third-party Apt repository. Once you’ve found the repo, place a # symbol in front of it.

By placing a # symbol in front of the repository, you are turning it off. Debian will ignore this repository, as any line with the # symbol is a code comment. 

Once you’ve added the # symbol in front of the repo, press the Ctrl + O key on the keyboard to save your changes. After that, exit Nano by pressing the Ctrl + X key.

When you’ve exited the Nano text editor, you can execute the apt update command to refresh Debian’s software sources. Debian will exclude the repo you turned off from the update, thus disabling it.

sudo apt update

Remove repo for good

If you want to remove an Apt repository from Debian for good, adding a # symbol in front to turn it off isn’t enough. To remove it altogether, do the following.

First, open up your /etc/apt/sources.list file in the Nano text editor with the command below.

su -

nano -w /etc/apt/sources.list

Inside the Nano text editor, locate the repo you wish to remove. Then, erase the repo line from the file by using the Backspace key. When the entire repo line is removed, press Ctrl + O to save the edits and Ctrl + X to exit Nano.

Once out of Nano, run the apt update command to refresh your Debian sources. By updating, Debian will exclude the now removed repo.

sudo apt update

Remove apt repository – Synaptic Package Manager

If removing Apt repositories via the terminal window isn’t your thing, you’ll be happy to know that it is possible to remove repos via the Synaptic package manager tool on Debian.

The Synaptic package manager tool comes pre-installed on most installations of Debian Linux. However, if you do not have this app installed, open up a terminal window and use the command below to get the app working on your system.

sudo apt install synaptic

To remove Apt repositories from your Debian Linux PC via Synaptic package manager, do the following. First, open the app and enter your user account password. 

Once the app is open on the desktop, look for the “Settings” button at the top of the page, and click on it with the mouse. Inside the “Settings” menu, there are several options to choose from. Select the “Repositories” button.

After clicking on the “Repositories” button with the mouse, the “Software & Updates” window will open on the Debian desktop. From here, click on the “Software & Updates” window with the mouse, and select “Other Software.”

In the “Other Software” tab, you’ll see software repositories available on your Debian Linux system. Look through the list for the one you wish to remove from your system.

Once you’ve found the Apt repository you wish to remove from Debian, select it with the mouse. Then, find the “Remove” button in the “Other Software” window and click on it to delete the repo from Debian for good.

When you’ve deleted your software repo, click the “Close” button. After selecting the “Close” button with the mouse, the Software & Updates app will ask you to reload your software sources. Allow it to do so to complete the removal of the Apt repository from your system.

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