4 ways to create a bootable USB installer on Linux

The primary way of installing a Linux operating system is from a USB. The problem is, many beginner users do not know how to create a bootable USB installer. In this list, we will go over 4 ways to create a bootable USB installer on Linux.

All of the programs we cover on this list require a USB flash drive of at least 2 GB in size. Before you attempt to follow this list to create a bootable USB, make sure the USB flash drive is adequate.

1. Etcher

The number one way to create a bootable USB installer on Linux is with the Etcher tool. The reason? It’s an incredibly easy program that anyone can figure out. To create a bootable USB installer on Linux with Etcher, do the following.

First, download the Etcher program from the official website. It comes in a ZIP archive and is an AppImage file. Extract the file and double-click on it with the mouse to run the program.

Once the program is open, download the Linux OS you want to create a bootable USB installer with. Then, plug in your USB flash drive. When the drive is plugged in, find the “Flash from file” button in Etcher, and click on it.

Browse for the ISO file you downloaded earlier, and select it to add the ISO file to Etcher. After that, click on the “Select target” button, and choose your USB flash drive.

With the ISO file and target set up in Etcher, click on the “Flash!” button to start the creation process. When it is done, you will have created a bootable USB installer on Linux with Etcher!

2. Gnome Disks

If you’re not a fan of the Etcher application, another easy way to create a bootable USB installer on Linux is with the Gnome Disks application. To start the process, you must install the program.

To install Gnome Disks, open up a terminal window and follow the command-line installation instructions down below that correspond with the Linux OS you currently use.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install gnome-disk-utility

Debian

sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S gnome-disk-utility

Fedora

sudo dnf install gnome-disk-utility

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install gnome-disk-utility

After installing the Gnome Disks program onto your computer, launch it by searching for “Disks” in the app menu. You can also press Alt + F2 on the keyboard and enter the gnome-disk-utility command to run it.

Once the Gnome Disks application is open on your computer, download the Linux ISO file you wish to use to create a bootable USB with. Then, go back to the Gnome Disks app.

Inside of Gnome Disks, look to the sidebar on the left. Locate your USB flash drive, and click on it with the mouse. Then, locate the menu button on the top right. If you can’t find it, it’s to the left of the minimize button.

In the Gnome Disks menu, locate the “Restore Disk Image” button, and click on it with the mouse. Then, select the Linux ISO file to add it to Gnome Disks. Select the “Start Restoring” button to create the bootable USB.

When the process is complete, you’ll have made a bootable Linux USB with Gnome Disks!

3. DD

Many Linux users prefer the terminal console as opposed to using GUI tools. If you’re a command-line fan and want to create a bootable USB, here’s what to do. First, open up a terminal window and use the lsblk command to show a readout of all connected storage devices on your Linux PC. Please make sure that your USB flash drive is connected when this command runs!

lsblk

Look through the lsblk command for the label of your USB flash drive. If you can’t find it, follow this in-depth guide on the subject. It will teach you how to read the lsblk command readout.

Once you’ve figured out your USB flash drive’s label, download the ISO file of the Linux operating system you’d like to create a bootable USB of, and execute the command below.

Note: change /dev/sdX in the command below to reflect the USB flash drive’s label found in lsblk.

sudo dd if=/dev/sdX of=~/Downloads/linux-iso-file.iso status=progress

The flashing process will take some time. You’ll know the process is complete when the numbers in the terminal are no longer updating, and you can type in it again with the keyboard. When the terminal is useable again, you’ll have created a bootable Linux USB in the terminal with dd!

4. ROSA ImageWriter

ROSA ImageWriter is a super useful GUI tool that you can use to create a bootable Linux USB if you’re in a hurry. To start the process, open up a terminal window and download the latest version of the app.

wget http://wiki.rosalab.ru/en/images/7/7f/RosaImageWriter-2.6.2-lin-x86_64.tar.xz

When the app is finished downloading, extract it, and start it up with the three commands below.

tar xvf RosaImageWriter-2.6.2-lin-x86_64.tar.xz

cd ~/RosaImageWriter

sudo ./RosaImageWriter

With the ROSA ImageWriter application open on your Linux desktop, go ahead and download the ISO file of the Linux OS you plan to create a bootable USB with. Then, click on the button next to “Image” to select the ISO file.

Go to “USB Device” and select your USB flash drive (if ROSA ImageWriter doesn’t do it automatically). Once both the ISO file and USB flash drive are selected, click on the “Write” button to start the creation process.

Creating a bootable USB with the ROSA ImageWriter will take time. When the process is complete, your bootable USB installer will be ready to use!

Conclusion

In this list, we covered 4 ways you can create a bootable USB installer on Linux. Each of the methods we demonstrated is great in their own way, but it is up to you to decide what one works best.

What is your favorite way to create a bootable USB installer on Linux? Sound off in the comment section below!

The post 4 ways to create a bootable USB installer on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to play Steam games on Chrome OS with Linux Support

Do you have a Google Chromebook? Do you love video games? Want to play Steam games on your Chromebook? If so, this guide is for you! Follow along and learn how to play Linux Steam games on Chrome OS!

Installing Steam on Chrome OS

The Steam app is easy to get working on Chrome OS thanks to Google’s addition of Linux software to the platform. To start the process, open up a terminal window on the Chrome OS desktop by pressing Shift + Ctrl + T on the keyboard. Then, when the terminal window is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 1: Using the Steam app on Chrome OS requires enabling Linux on your Chrome OS device. Enabling Linux support on Chrome OS is not a difficult process, but it’s not something that beginners will be able to figure out on their own.

To set up Linux support on Chrome OS, please follow our guide on the subject. It breaks down the process into easy to follows to enable Linux support.

Step 2: Once Linux support is enabled on your Chromebook, it is time to add the Debian software sources to Chrome OS. Adding these software sources will make it possible to install Debian software right on your Chromebook, including Steam.

To add the Debian software source, go to the terminal and use the following echo command. The echo command will write the software source to your list file.

echo 'deb http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free' | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list

Step 3: After adding the Debian software source to your Chromebook, you will need to update it. The reason that the software sources need to be updated is that the Chrome OS Linux setup needs to download a release file and add the software source to Apt, so you can use it to install programs.

To update, use the apt update command below.

sudo apt update

Step 4: Once the Linux system is up to date on your Chrome OS, you must use the dpkg command to enable 32-bit packages. The reason you must enable 32-bit packages on Chrome OS is that Steam, along with many games on Steam, requires a lot of 32-bit items to run correctly. Without them, it’s likely many of the Steam games you install on Chrome OS will not work at all.

To enable 32-bit packages on Chrome OS, run the dpkg –add-architecture i386 command.

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Step 5: When you’ve enabled 32-bit packages on the Linux system for Chrome OS, you must re-run the apt update command. The reason that you must update again is that the Linux system needs to refresh and put 32-bit packages into the installable software database.

sudo apt update

Step 6: With everything up to date, it is time to install Steam. To install the Steam client for Linux onto your Chromebook, use the apt install command below. Be sure to press the Y button on the keyboard when it appears in the prompt on the screen.

sudo apt install steam

Once the installation of Steam is complete, you will be able to launch the Linux Steam client on your Chromebook and enjoy your favorite Linux video games.

Enable Windows gaming support

Setting up Steam for Linux on Chrome OS is awesome, and it will allow you to play some Linux games on your Chromebook. However, if you want to play your favorite Windows games on your Chrome OS device, you will need to enable Windows gaming support.

To enable Windows gaming support in Steam for your Chromebook, follow the step-by-step instructions outlined below.

Step 1: Open up Steam on your Chromebook and log into it with your Steam account. After logging into Steam, look for the “Steam” menu in the top-left section of the app.

Inside of the “Steam” menu, there are several different options to choose from. Click on the “Steam Play” menu item. In the “Steam Play” area, you will be able to turn on Valve’s Steam Play feature.

Steam Play allows for the Linux Steam client to play Windows Steam games with the help of a compatibility tool called Proton. For more information on Proton, check out this page here.

Step 2: Inside of the “Steam Play” area of the Steam settings, check the box next to “Enable Steam Play for supported titles.” Checking this box will allow you to play Windows games that Valve has personally made compatible.

Step 3: After enabling the “Enable Steam Play for supported titles,” find the “Enable Steam Play for all other titles” box, and check it. Turning on this feature will make all Windows Steam games work on your Chromebook, even if they don’t have Valve’s blessing.

Step 4: Find the “OK” button in Steam, and click it to save the changes made. Then, reboot Steam. Once the Steam app is back open, you’ll be able to play Windows Steam apps on Chrome OS!

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How to install the Mcata GTK theme on Linux

If you like macOS Catalina and want to make your Linux PC look like it, the Mcata GTK theme is for you. It almost perfectly mimics the look of macOS Catalina, and it even includes both a dark and light variant. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install the Mcata GTK theme on Linux.

Downloading Mcata on Linux

To download the Mcata GTK theme, you must head over to the “Files” tab on Gnome-look.org, a popular Linux theme website. After clicking on the “Files” tab, you will see a large selection of themes to choose from. These themes are;

  • Mcata-dark
  • Mcata-dark-alt
  • Mcata-dark-solid
  • Mcata-dark-solid-alt
  • Mcata-light
  • Mcata-light-at
  • Mcata-light-solid
  • Mcata-light-solid-alt

To download any of these Mcata GTK theme archives, follow the instructions outlined below.

Mcata-dark

To get your hands on Mcata-dark, click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-dark.tar.xz.

Mcata-dark-alt

Want to try out Mcata-dark-alt? Click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-dark-alt.tar.xz.

Mcata-dark-solid

Are you looking to use Mcata-dark-solid? Click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-dark-solid.tar.xz.

 Mcata-dark-solid-alt

Those who want to try out Mcata-dark-solid-alt, click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-dark-solid-alt.tar.xz.

Mcata-light

Prefer light themes? Want to take Mcata-light for a spin? Click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-light.tar.xz.

Mcata-light-alt

Want to try out Mcata-light-alt on your computer? |Click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-light-alt-20200623011809.tar.xz.

Mcata-light-solid

If you’re a fan of Mcata-light, but would prefer the solid version, click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-light-solid.tar.xz.

Mcata-light-solid-alt

There’s an alternative spin of Mcata-light solid. To get it, click on the blue button in the “DL” column next to Mcata-light-solid-alt.tar.xz.

Confirm download

Want to confirm that your download is complete? Run the ls command in the ~/Downloads directory in combination with the grep command. If the Mcata GTK theme downloads successfully, it will appear in the command output.

ls ~/Downloads | grep Mcata

Extracting Mcata on Linux

Extracting the Mcata GTK theme is essential, as when the theme file is downloaded from Gnome-look.org, it can not be installed because it is in a TarXZ archive.

Open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. To extract a TarXZ archive, you need to make use of the tar command. Follow the extraction commands below that correspond with the version of the Mcata GTK theme you chose to download.

Mcata-dark

cd ~/Downloads
tar xvf Mcata-dark.tar.xz

Mcata-dark-alt

cd ~/Downloads
tar xvf Mcata-dark-alt.tar.xz

Mcata-dark-solid

cd ~/Downloads
tar xvf Mcata-dark-solid.tar.xz

 Mcata-dark-solid-alt

cd ~/Downloads
tar xvf Mcata-dark-solid-alt.tar.xz

Mcata-light

cd ~/Downloads
tar xvf Mcata-light.tar.xz

Mcata-light-alt

cd ~/Downloads

tar xvf Mcata-light-alt-20200623011809.tar.xz

Mcata-light-solid

cd ~/Downloads

tar xvf Mcata-light-solid.tar.xz

Mcata-light-solid-alt

cd ~/Downloads

tar xvf Mcata-light-solid-alt.tar.xz

Installing Mcata on Linux

There are two ways to install the Mcata GTK theme on Linux. The first way is to install it in single-user mode. Single-user mode means that the Mcata GTK theme will only be available to the person that installs it. The second way of installing the Mcata GTK theme is the system-wide mode. System-wide mode means that every user on the Linux PC will have access to Mcata, even if they haven’t installed it themselves. In this guide, we’ll go over how to set it up in both ways.

Single-user

To install the Mcata GTK theme on Linux in single-user mode, start by opening up a terminal window. Then, when the terminal window is open, use the mkdir command to create the ~/.themes folder. This folder will handle the Mcata GTK theme on your system.

mkdir -p ~/.themes

After creating the ~/.themes folder, use the CD command to move into the ~/Downloads directory where the Mcata theme is located.

cd ~/Downloads

Once inside of the ~/Downloads directory, use the mv command to move the files into the ~/.theme folder.

mv Mcata*/ ~/.themes

System-wide

To install the Mcata GTK Theme on your Linux PC in system-wide mode, start by opening up a terminal window. From there, use the CD command to move into the ~/Downloads directory.

Inside of the ~/Downloads directory, elevate your terminal session to the root account. The root account is required to install the Mcata GTK theme in system-wide mode.

sudo -s

Once the terminal session is logged into the root account, use the mv command to install the Mcata GTK theme into the /usr/share/themes/ directory on your Linux PC.

mv Mcata*/ /usr/share/themes/

Enabling Mcata on Linux

The Mcata GTK theme is now on your Linux PC. However, you will not be able to use it until it is set as the default GTK theme. To enable it as the GTK theme, open up the settings window for your desktop and change the default theme to “Mcata.” Or, if you’re unsure of how to enable the MCata GTK theme, follow one of the links below.

The post How to install the Mcata GTK theme on Linux appeared first on AddictiveTips.

5 ways to watch video streams on the Linux desktop

Do you want to watch video streams on your Linux desktop? Confused and unsure about how to do it? We can help! Follow along with this list as we go over 5 ways you can watch video streams on the Linux desktop!

1. VLC

The number 1 way to watch video streams on the Linux desktop is by making use of the VLC media player. Why? It has impressive compatibility with various types of video streams. It even has a cool plugin API that makes it possible to add in support for video streams that VLC doesn’t support.

To watch a video stream in the VLC media player on Linux, do the following. First, open up a terminal window and install the VLC media player if you don’t already have it installed with the commands below.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install vlc

Debian

sudo apt-get install vlc

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S vlc

Fedora

sudo dnf install vlc

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install vlc

Flatpak

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub org.videolan.VLC

Snap

sudo snap install vlc

After installing the VLC app on your computer, open it up. Once the app is open, click on the “Media” button in the top-left corner of the app to open up the “Media” menu. Inside of the “Media” menu, look for the option that says “Open Network Stream” and click on it.

When you click on the “Open Network Stream” button, you will see a pop-up window with “Please enter a network URL”. Paste the URL of the video stream you would like to watch in the box, and click on the “Play” button to watch the stream!

2. SMPlayer

Another great way to watch video streams on the Linux desktop is SMPlayer. It’s a lot like VLC, in that it can handle a multitude of video formats and stream types. It can also handle audio streams and even YouTube!

To watch a video stream with SMPlayer, start by making sure the app is installed on your computer. If you need to install the app, open up a terminal window, and follow the commands below.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install smplayer

Debian

sudo apt-get install smplayer

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S smplayer

Fedora

sudo dnf install smplayer

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install smplayer

Once the SMPlayer app is installed on your computer, launch the app by searching for it in the app menu. Then, when the app is open, find the “Open” menu, and click on it with the mouse.

Inside of the “Open” menu, there are several choices to choose from. Click on the “URL” option with the mouse. After clicking on “URL,” you will see the “Enter URL” window appear. Paste the video stream or YouTube URL to stream it directly to your Linux desktop!

3. MPlayer

If you’re not a huge fan of GUI media players on Linux but still want to be able to have a good video player that can play video streams on the Linux desktop, MPlayer is for you! It’s a terminal-based media player, and it works quite well!

To stream video on the Linux desktop with the MPlayer application, start by installing it on your Linux PC with the commands below.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install mplayer

Debian

sudo apt-get install mplayer

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S mplayer

Fedora

sudo dnf install mplayer

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install mplayer

Once the MPlayer application is installed onto your computer, open up a terminal window on the desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. Then, when the terminal window is open, use the command example below to stream your favorite videos on the Linux desktop!

mplayer url-of-video-stream-here

4. Gnome Videos

Those using the Gnome Shell desktop, or desktop environments built upon the Gnome Shell desktop will find the Gnome Videos app an excellent, beautiful way to stream videos on Linux.

To stream videos with the Gnome Videos app, start by installing it on your computer using the commands below.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install totem

Debian

sudo apt-get install totem

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S totem

Fedora

sudo dnf install totem

OpenSUSE

sudo zypper install totem

Flatpak

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

flatpak install flathub org.gnome.Totem

After the Gnome Videos app is installed onto your computer, launch it by searching for “Videos” in the app menu. Then, when the app is open, find the plus sign button (+) and click on it with the mouse.

When you click on the plus sign button (+), a menu will appear. In this menu, locate the “Add web video” option, and select it. Then, paste in the video stream you’d like to watch to load it into Gnome Videos!

5. Celluloid

There are a lot of video players on Linux, and Celluloid is one of the best. Why is it one of the best? Not only can it handle any video you throw at it, but it can stream videos from various formats, but it can deliver you all of these things with an excellent, simple UI.

To stream videos on the Linux desktop with Celluloid, you must first install the app. To get Celluloid installed on Linux, please follow our in-depth guide on the subject. We dig deep and cover how to get the app working on just about every Linux OS possible.

Once the Celluloid app is installed, launch it by searching for it in the app menu. Then, when the app is open, look for the plus sign button (+) in the top-left and click on it with the mouse. After clicking on the plus sign button (+), a menu will appear. Look in the menu for the “Open Location” button.

When you click on the “Open Location” button, a window will appear. In the window, paste the link to the video stream you would like to watch. Then, click on the “Open” button to play the stream in Celluloid.

Conclusion

In this list, we covered 5 ways to watch video streams on the Linux desktop. These apps are some of the most popular video players out there for Linux and will be able to handle any stream you throw at it. Enjoy!

The post 5 ways to watch video streams on the Linux desktop appeared first on AddictiveTips.

How to tag your music on Linux with GabTag

Are you looking for an easy, simple way to tag music files on your Linux PC? Check out GabTag! It’s a refreshingly easy to use program that makes tagging and fixing music file tags on Linux a breeze!

In this guide, we’ll show you how to install GabTag. We’ll also go over how to tag your favorite songs with the GabTag app!

Installing GabTag on Linux

The GabTag application is available for Linux in a few ways. Before we can go over how to use the program to tag and catalog your music files, we must demonstrate how to install the app on your Linux PC.

GabTag is primarily a Flatpak application. The developer hasn’t bothered to package the program for Ubuntu, Debian, Arch Linux or other Linux OSes, and for a good reason. It takes a lot of time and effort to make apps work on every mainstream Linux OS under the sun. Instead, it’s released as a Flatpak, and anyone who can install the Flatpak runtime will be able to use the app. Its source code is also available for those that like to compile and install software themselves.

To start the installation of GabTag on your Linux PC, open up a terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or Ctrl + Shift + T on the keyboard. From there, follow the command-line installation instructions below that corresponds with the installation method you prefer.

Flatpak via Flathub

To install the GabTag application on your PC from the Flathub app store, you must install the Flatpak runtime on your computer. To install the Flatpak runtime, open up a terminal window, search for the “flatpak” application, and install it the way you’d typically install programs on your Linux PC. Alternatively, follow our in-depth tutorial on how to set up the Flatpak runtime on Linux.

Once you’ve set up the Flatpak runtime on your computer, it’s time to configure the Flathub app store. To do that, use the flatpak remote-add command below.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

With the Flathub app store configured with Flatpak on your computer, the installation of GabTag can begin. Using the flatpak install command below, set up the latest release of GabTag. Alternatively, head over to the GabTag page on Flathub, and click on the “Install” button. When you click on “Install,” KDE Discover or Gnome Software will attempt to install the app.

flatpak install flathub com.github.lachhebo.Gabtag

Source code

If you’re not a fan of Flathub and would prefer to build the app yourself, you can grab the latest source code for GabTag on the developer’s GitHub page. However, please understand that though this is the source code, it does not compile down to a traditional, installable Linux binary. Instead, it compiles into Flatpak.

You should only attempt to install GabTag through the source code if the Flathub release doesn’t work. For more information, click here.

Tagging your music with Gabtag

To tag your music with GabTag, start by opening the app. To open the app, search for “GabTag” in the app menu and click on it. Alternatively, open up a terminal and use the flatpak run command below to start it up. Then, once GabTag is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below to tag your music files.

flatpak run com.github.lachhebo.Gabtag

Step 1: Locate the “Open” button at the top-left section of the app and click on it with the mouse. By clicking on “Open,” a file browser will appear. Using that file browser, locate the folder in which the music files are on your PC that you wish to tag.

Click “Select” in the file-browser to open it up.

Step 2: In the left-hand side-bar, select the song you would like to tag using the GabTag app. By selecting the song, GabTag will automatically check the internet for relevant tag info, and even lyrics.

Click on the “Set Tags” button with the mouse, located underneath the “MusicBrainz Tags” section of GabTag. By clicking on the “Set Tags” button, you will be assigning all information that GabTag tracked down to the song.

Step 3: Go to the information section of the song and edit anything that the GabTag app may not have added. For example, you may need to manually download an album cover and select it with “Load” under the cover section if GabTag doesn’t add a cover.

Step 4: Scroll down beneath the lyrics (if GabTag has added lyrics) and click on the “Set Lyrics” button to set the lyrics for your song. If GabTag didn’t add lyrics, you might need to do this manually.

Step 5: Locate the “Save All” button in the top-right section of the app. Then, click on it with the mouse. Selecting the “Save All” button will save all of your modifications. So, if you’ve used GabTag to edit 15 songs, it will save the edits to all of those songs.

Alternatively, click on an individual song and click “Save Modification” to save a single song’s tag edit.

If GabTag isn’t the right tool for you to tag your music, give MusicBrainz Picard a try.

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