How to Insert Symbols into Google Docs and Slides

You can insert special characters in your documents and presentations without having to remember all those Alt-codes by using Google Docs and Slides easy-to-use character insertion tool. It offers a myriad of symbols, characters, symbols, languages, and more. Here’s how you can insert special characters into your documents.

Note: You can’t insert characters directly into Google Sheets, but you can copy and paste them into a cell on the spreadsheet.

How to Insert Special Characters into Google Docs and Slides

Inserting symbols into your file is a straightforward process that you can perform in several ways. Whether you want some silly emojis, arrows, or a different language’s scripts you can achieve this by manually selecting a category, typing in the search bar, or by drawing what you’re looking for.

The first thing you’ll need to do is open up a new  Google Docs or Slides file to get started.

Alternatively, if you’re using the latest version of Chrome, you can type “docs.new” or “slides.new” into a new tab’s address bar.

In your document, open the “Insert” menu and then click the “Special Characters” command.

Manually Search for Symbols

If you don’t have a particular character in mind (or you’re not sure how to search for what you do have in mind), you can use the drop-down menus to browse through the plethora of available symbols.

Read the remaining 21 paragraphs

How to Insert Symbols into Google Docs and Slides

You can insert special characters in your documents and presentations without having to remember all those Alt-codes by using Google Docs and Slides easy-to-use character insertion tool. It offers a myriad of symbols, characters, symbols, languages, and more. Here’s how you can insert special characters into your documents.

Note: You can’t insert characters directly into Google Sheets, but you can copy and paste them into a cell on the spreadsheet.

How to Insert Special Characters into Google Docs and Slides

Inserting symbols into your file is a straightforward process that you can perform in several ways. Whether you want some silly emojis, arrows, or a different language’s scripts you can achieve this by manually selecting a category, typing in the search bar, or by drawing what you’re looking for.

The first thing you’ll need to do is open up a new  Google Docs or Slides file to get started.

Alternatively, if you’re using the latest version of Chrome, you can type “docs.new” or “slides.new” into a new tab’s address bar.

In your document, open the “Insert” menu and then click the “Special Characters” command.

Manually Search for Symbols

If you don’t have a particular character in mind (or you’re not sure how to search for what you do have in mind), you can use the drop-down menus to browse through the plethora of available symbols.

Read the remaining 21 paragraphs

Microsoft Is Talking About Windows 10’s Quality, But Changing Nothing

Microsoft today re-released Windows 10’s October 2018 Update. Rather than explaining what went wrong, Microsoft publicly patted itself on the back for its great quality assurance process. Microsoft promises increased transparency and better communication, but talk is cheap.

Has Anything Changed?

There’s only one lasting change to Windows 10’s development process we know about, and that was made on October 9. The Feedback Hub now lets Windows Insiders rate the “severity” of issues they’re reporting. This should help the Windows team catch serious file-deletion bugs instead of overlooking them.

Microsoft has not announced any concrete changes in the last month. With the re-release of the October 2018 Update, Microsoft has slowed down after it got burned:

While the April Update had the fastest Windows 10 update rollout velocity, we are taking a more measured approach with the October Update, slowing our rollout to more carefully study device health data.

Better yet, Windows Update will not install the October 2018 Update just because you clicked “Check for Updates.” (You can still download the Update Assistant tool if you want to update right now.)

But Microsoft has not said whether this is a lasting change. Next time around, Microsoft could quickly release the update to people who click “Check for Updates” again.

RELATED: Windows 10’s October Update Returns, Promises Not to Delete Your Files

Microsoft Promises “Transparency”

Microsoft published a lengthy blog post about how it ensures Windows 10 quality. Most of that post is describing all the work Microsoft was already doing to test Windows 10. Microsoft claims it’s doing a great job with “Windows as a service” and says “customer incidents” are down with every update.

Read the remaining 15 paragraphs

Microsoft Is Talking About Windows 10’s Quality, But Changing Nothing

Microsoft today re-released Windows 10’s October 2018 Update. Rather than explaining what went wrong, Microsoft publicly patted itself on the back for its great quality assurance process. Microsoft promises increased transparency and better communication, but talk is cheap.

Has Anything Changed?

There’s only one lasting change to Windows 10’s development process we know about, and that was made on October 9. The Feedback Hub now lets Windows Insiders rate the “severity” of issues they’re reporting. This should help the Windows team catch serious file-deletion bugs instead of overlooking them.

Microsoft has not announced any concrete changes in the last month. With the re-release of the October 2018 Update, Microsoft has slowed down after it got burned:

While the April Update had the fastest Windows 10 update rollout velocity, we are taking a more measured approach with the October Update, slowing our rollout to more carefully study device health data.

Better yet, Windows Update will not install the October 2018 Update just because you clicked “Check for Updates.” (You can still download the Update Assistant tool if you want to update right now.)

But Microsoft has not said whether this is a lasting change. Next time around, Microsoft could quickly release the update to people who click “Check for Updates” again.

RELATED: Windows 10’s October Update Returns, Promises Not to Delete Your Files

Microsoft Promises “Transparency”

Microsoft published a lengthy blog post about how it ensures Windows 10 quality. Most of that post is describing all the work Microsoft was already doing to test Windows 10. Microsoft claims it’s doing a great job with “Windows as a service” and says “customer incidents” are down with every update.

Read the remaining 15 paragraphs

The Best Small Monitors For Small Projects And Small Spaces

When it comes to monitors, bigger is better… unless it isn’t. If your specific needs call for something smaller—like secondary screens, a small, space-constrained workstation, or even a custom in-car installation—your options are limited. Here are the best among them.

While monitor manufacturers don’t seem particularly interested in selling monitors smaller than about 24 inches anymore, there are a few quality options for those who don’t need big screens. We’ve made selections in the range of 20, 15, and 10 inches that should cover most applications, as well as a small TV (with the included antenna tuner and speakers) and a portable USB-powered option.

The Best 20” Monitor: Viewsonic VA2055SM ($85)

small monitor, monitor, viewsonic, 20 inch, VA2055SM

Monitors in this size range tend to skew low-market, chopping off features in the name of price. And while Viewsonic’s VA2055SM is definitely among the cheapest in its lineup, it also has a few extras you don’t expect at this price point.

The LCD screen covers a full HD 1920×1080 resolution, and it includes a VESA mount for use with aftermarket stands or multi-monitor setups. It also manages to pack in some low-power speakers into the case, saving a little money and space if you’re short on either. Note that the monitor uses either DVI or VGA for video, so you might need an adapter if you’re only able to use HDMI or DisplayPort.

The Best 15” Monitor: Eyoyo 15.6-inch IPS ($146)

monitor, small monitor, 15 inch, 15", 15.6,

This little screen is designed to fit into almost any spot you want it to. With HDMI, VGA, standard RCA, and direct security camera BNC inputs, it can connect immediately to almost any desktop or laptop machine (minus Apple’s USB-C-only designs).

With a surprisingly dense 1080p IPS panel and a VESA mount to boot, it’s amazingly versatile, and it comes with a handy remote control as well. Speakers are mounted to the rear, so they won’t be great options for listening to music, but they’re fine for basic interaction.

The Best 10” Monitor: Eyoyo 10-inch IPS

Read the remaining 11 paragraphs