How to Back Up Your Mac’s Photo Library to An External Drive

Photos are some of the most important files people want to keep safe. Storing them in the cloud is nice, but you might also want the peace of mind of having your pictures stored locally. Luckily, it’s easy enough to copy your Mac’s Photos library to an external drive.

This guide assumes you’re using the actual “Photos” app on your Mac, the default if you’ve used iCloud Photo Stream or imported from your iPhone. If you just have your photos in a folder on your Mac, all you need to do is plug your external drive in and move them over. If you’re using another app that maintains a library, you’ll have to configure things within that app.

Moving Your Photos Library

To understand how this works, it’s important to know how the Photos app catalogs files. It’s actually simple; there’s a single file that contains your entire library. If you want to back this up, you plug in your external hard drive and drag the whole file over to that hard drive in the sidebar of Finder.

The harder part comes when you need to change which Photos library you want to use. You’ll have to change the location from which the Photos app is reading.

In the image below, I’ve got two Photos libraries, the default one, and a backup library.

While you can access the backup library just by double-clicking it—which will open it in the Photos app—it’s better to switch Photos to use this one by default. You can always switch back to the regular library when you need to.

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Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10

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Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process.

This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

MIchael Fortin, corporate vice president for Windows at Microsoft, explained that this is still going on in a blog post about Windows 10’s monthly update process on December 10, 2018:

We also release optional updates in the third and fourth weeks of the month, respectively known as “C” and “D” releases. These are preview releases, primarily for commercial customers and advanced users “seeking” updates.  These updates have only non-security fixes. The intent of these releases is to provide visibility into, and enable testing of, the non-security fixes that will be included in the next Update Tuesday release. Advanced users can access the “C” and “D” releases by navigating to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and clicking the “Check for updates” box. The “D” release has proven popular for those “seeking” to validate the non-security content of the next “B” release.

There it is in Microsoft’s own words. Fortin says “advanced users” can get the preview releases by clicking “Check for updates.” These updates would normally not be automatically installed until they’ve been tested. But, after you click the button, you’ve become a “seeker” and not a normal Windows 10 user.

Once again, Microsoft is using everyone who clicks “Check for Updates” as a beta tester. Don’t click this button unless you want unstable updates. Your Windows 10 PC will automatically install updates as soon as they’re stable.

At the very least, Microsoft needs to provide a warning before Windows 10 users click the “Check for updates” button. Don’t warn people in blog posts that only advanced users will read.

As Woody Leonhard points out over at Computerworld, these extra monthly cumulative updates aren’t tested through the normal Windows Insider process. They’re just tested on your PC after you click the update. And Surface Book 2 owners have seen blue screen errors after installing these “optional” cumulative updates recently, so the stability of these updates is in real question.

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The Best All-In-One Tool Kits

If you’re just striking out on your own, or you’ve never had to make repairs for yourself before, finding the tools you need can be intimidating. Make it easier by grabbing one of these all-in-one kits.

The tool kits below are inexpensive, at least in relative terms—buying all of the tools inside them individually would cost many times the price of the kit. They’re not world-class tools like you’d find in a mechanic’s garage or on a handyman’s belt, but they’re more than capable of handling small home repairs or furniture assembly. Odds are that if the job you’re doing can be covered by a five-minute YouTube video, the tools below will suffice. If not, they’re great places to start fro a more complete collection of hardware without spending a fortune.

The Best Small Kit: Cartman 136-piece Tool Set ($21)

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For those in small homes or just looking for an inexpensive kit to grab for quick jobs, this Cartman package will do nicely. It doesn’t include anything particularly high-end, but the compact, fold-out case covers all the basics for easy home and appliance repair.

In addition to a bit driver and a smaller set of screwdrivers for precision work, the kit includes a tape measure, adjustable wrench, and level, which aren’t necessarily a given in anything under thirty bucks. The package even includes a few torx bits and a some nails and screws, if you’re buying for something you need to take care of right away.

The Best Large Kit: Stanley 170-piece Mixed Tool Set ($85)

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If you want something that’s a seriously good start to a more extensive collection of tools, check out this Stanley collection. 170 pieces cover just about everything you’ll need short of full power tools.

A huge selection of bits, ratchets, L-keys, and wrenches should allow you to assemble or disassemble almost anything, and large and small full screwdrivers in Philips and flathead drivers are great for quick jobs. The package includes a 16-inch tape measure and a utility knife, but is notably missing a hammer—add a solid one and you’re good to go for almost anything.

The Best All-In-One Tool Bag: WorkPro 156-piece Home Repair Tool Set ($60)

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How to Use Google Lens on the iPhone

If you’re a fan of Google Lens, you now have another avenue for accessing the feature in iOS, because it’s now included in the Google Search app on the iPhone. Here’s how to use it.

Google Lens is a neat little feature that can identify real-world objects, like signs, buildings, books, plants, and more using your phone’s camera. And it gives you more information about the object. It’s available in the Google Photos app, but if you don’t use Google Photos, you can now access Google Lens in the regular Google Search app. We’ll show you how to use Google Lens in both apps.

In the Google Search App

If you don’t already have the app, you can download it here. Once you’re up and running, just start by tapping on the Google Lens icon inside of the search bar.

If you don’t see the icon, try closing out of the app completely and the re-opening it.

On the next screen, tap “Turn on camera to use Lens” at the bottom.

Hit “OK” when the app asks for permission to use the camera.

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New Android Trojan Steals Your Money Using PayPal’s Official App

There have been some bad trojans found on Android, but this is possibly one of the worst. This new threat automates a PayPal transaction for $1000 and sends it using the official PayPal app—even on accounts with 2FA enabled.

The PayPal Hijack

It does this using a couple of different methods and leveraging Android’s Accessibility services. The malicious app is currently disguising itself as an Android optimization tool and has been making its way onto users’ phones through third-party app stores. So for starters, don’t use third-party app stores.

When installed, “Optimization Android” (seriously, why would you install something with a name like this in the first place?) also creates an Accessibility service called “Enable statistics.” It then requests access to this feature, which seems harmless enough—it will allow the app to monitor user actions and retrieve window content. If you think it’s all in the name of making your phone faster, it almost makes sense.

But that’s where things get worse because now the trojan can effectively emulate touches. It generates a notification that looks like it’s from PayPal urging the user to log in.

When tapped, this notification opens the official PayPal app (if installed)—so this isn’t a phishing attempt. The official app opens and asks the user to log in. Since this a legitimate login attempt within the official app, 2FA does nothing to secure the account—you’ll just log in as normal, entering your 2FA code when it comes in.

Once you’re logged in, the malicious app takes over, transferring $1000 from your PayPal account to the attacker. This automated process happens in fewer than five seconds. We Live Security made a video of the entire process, and it’s pretty crazy how fast it all happens:

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