5 Ways to Get a Grip on Mobile Devices in Your Office

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Did you know that a whopping two-thirds of U.S. adults own a smartphone? This figure is still climbing and the presence of employee-owned smartphones has dramatically changed the face of office. Businesses that aren’t prepared for this major influx of devices are setting themselves up for some major problems.


Employees bringing their devices to work is an IT trend known as BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). In order to make mobile devices in the workplace work for you, you’re going to need to implement a comprehensive BYOD strategy. If you don’t, then your IT network will be a virtual Wild Wild West of sorts as different devices across the entire technology spectrum access your company’s sensitive data. If some of these devices contain malware or data is downloaded to an employee’s device, and the device becomes lost or stolen, you’d be toast. Crises like these can easily be prevented by having a solid BYOD strategy.

To be sure, the benefits of having mobile devices in the workplace make BYOD worth the effort; employees that use their own devices are more innovative, more productive, and are generally happier about their job. To take advantage of these benefits, you’re going to want to cover all of these bases with your company’s BYOD strategy.

  • Identify potential risks: Unsecured devices can easily contain viruses and malware, which can damage your system. Plus, an employee-owned device without privacy protections can pose the problem of hackers stealing the data on the device, which would essentially be stealing your data. By taking into account and protecting your network from every possible risk, you’ll be able to use mobile devices with confidence.
  • Define a clear BYOD policy: As is the case with any policy, the clearer you are, the better. A solid BYOD policy encompasses your entire IT infrastructure, along with every possible access point. Additionally, if you’re able to clarify your IT goals and what you’re looking to achieve with mobile devices, then you can draft a BYOD policy that can maximize these goals.
  • Consider regulations and compliance issues: If confidential information, like medical records, aren’t stored properly and get leaked by way of mobile devices, it can carry a hefty fine from laws like PCI and HIPAA. Concerning data of this sensitive nature, your BYOD policy needs to follow these laws down to the letter.
  • Keep track of used devices: Every device that accesses your network needs to be accounted for. For example, you can’t have random devices logging on, accessing files, and then disappearing with that information. If an employee loses a device with company information on it, or even sells it to a third party, then you would have no idea who would get to see your data.
  • Train your staff: When it comes to BYOD, educating your staff is key. If they’re on board with your BYOD policy and fully understand the ramifications of breaking it, then you will be able to rest assured that all of the devices popping up around the office are helping your organization, not hindering it.

As you can imagine, BYOD policies are not a one-size-fits-all policy for every business. Each business has different needs, IT goals, and security risks. Therefore, in order to get the most comprehensive BYOD strategy for your company, you’re going to want to consult with the IT professionals at Amaxx. We know what questions to ask and what to look for in your IT network so that your organization can take full advantage of this trend.

Additionally, we have great tools at our disposal, like our mobile device management solution that can help you control what all of the devices are doing on your network, like adding permissions regarding which files these devices can access. To implement an airtight BYOD strategy for your business, call Amaxx today at 614-923-6700.

5 Ways to Get a Grip on Mobile Devices in Your Office

b2ap3_thumbnail_byod_comprehensive_400.jpg

Did you know that a whopping two-thirds of U.S. adults own a smartphone? This figure is still climbing and the presence of employee-owned smartphones has dramatically changed the face of office. Businesses that aren’t prepared for this major influx of devices are setting themselves up for some major problems.


Employees bringing their devices to work is an IT trend known as BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). In order to make mobile devices in the workplace work for you, you’re going to need to implement a comprehensive BYOD strategy. If you don’t, then your IT network will be a virtual Wild Wild West of sorts as different devices across the entire technology spectrum access your company’s sensitive data. If some of these devices contain malware or data is downloaded to an employee’s device, and the device becomes lost or stolen, you’d be toast. Crises like these can easily be prevented by having a solid BYOD strategy.

To be sure, the benefits of having mobile devices in the workplace make BYOD worth the effort; employees that use their own devices are more innovative, more productive, and are generally happier about their job. To take advantage of these benefits, you’re going to want to cover all of these bases with your company’s BYOD strategy.

  • Identify potential risks: Unsecured devices can easily contain viruses and malware, which can damage your system. Plus, an employee-owned device without privacy protections can pose the problem of hackers stealing the data on the device, which would essentially be stealing your data. By taking into account and protecting your network from every possible risk, you’ll be able to use mobile devices with confidence.
  • Define a clear BYOD policy: As is the case with any policy, the clearer you are, the better. A solid BYOD policy encompasses your entire IT infrastructure, along with every possible access point. Additionally, if you’re able to clarify your IT goals and what you’re looking to achieve with mobile devices, then you can draft a BYOD policy that can maximize these goals.
  • Consider regulations and compliance issues: If confidential information, like medical records, aren’t stored properly and get leaked by way of mobile devices, it can carry a hefty fine from laws like PCI and HIPAA. Concerning data of this sensitive nature, your BYOD policy needs to follow these laws down to the letter.
  • Keep track of used devices: Every device that accesses your network needs to be accounted for. For example, you can’t have random devices logging on, accessing files, and then disappearing with that information. If an employee loses a device with company information on it, or even sells it to a third party, then you would have no idea who would get to see your data.
  • Train your staff: When it comes to BYOD, educating your staff is key. If they’re on board with your BYOD policy and fully understand the ramifications of breaking it, then you will be able to rest assured that all of the devices popping up around the office are helping your organization, not hindering it.

As you can imagine, BYOD policies are not a one-size-fits-all policy for every business. Each business has different needs, IT goals, and security risks. Therefore, in order to get the most comprehensive BYOD strategy for your company, you’re going to want to consult with the IT professionals at Amaxx. We know what questions to ask and what to look for in your IT network so that your organization can take full advantage of this trend.

Additionally, we have great tools at our disposal, like our mobile device management solution that can help you control what all of the devices are doing on your network, like adding permissions regarding which files these devices can access. To implement an airtight BYOD strategy for your business, call Amaxx today at 614.486.3481 .

A Look at the Glue That Holds the Internet of Things Together

b2ap3_thumbnail_radio_narrow_band_400.jpgWith millions of new and exciting devices connecting to the Internet every day, the Internet of Things is an IT trend that has the potential to dramatically improve society. Yet, the most significant change brought about by the IoT may actually come from devices that aren’t really that exciting.

Even though sexy devices like smartphones, smart cars, and smart homes are getting all the press when it comes to IoT, it’s the forgotten-about, behind-the-scenes devices which drive the IoT forward, like gas meters, water gauges, trash cans, soil moisture sensors, and more. Instead of having these devices be used to download the latest apps and post to social media, they’re primarily tasked with a singular purpose, like collecting and transmitting data so that work can get done more efficiently.

Devices like these actually present a unique technical challenge: how does one connect these devices to the Internet in such a way that little (if any) maintenance is required (like swapping out a device’s battery), and in locations without a reliable Internet connection? Having these devices achieve such requirements is necessary in order to enjoy the desired benefits. Otherwise, implementing small IoT devices on a wide scale wouldn’t be worth it, due to the expense of providing power, device maintenance, and Internet coverage to remote places. For example, installing an Internet-connected gas meter to a log cabin in the middle of the woods would prove most difficult due to poor 3G coverage, and it would be inconvenient to send a technician to service the meter. How then does one equip important IoT devices to hard-to-reach areas?

The answer lies in narrowband Internet of Things technology (NB-IoT), a development that allows for billions of obscure devices to be connected to the Internet, earning it the reputation by experts as “the glue that holds the IoT together.” NetworkComputing explains:

NB-IoT, originally called the cellular Internet of Things, is an emerging industry solution designed to enhance the global deployment of low-power wide area (LPWA) networks. Through licensed operator spectrum, in-band, guard band and standalone deployments, NB-IoT can provide connectivity to devices in hard to reach places without requiring much power to do so.

The ways that NB-IoT technology expands the IoT breaks down barriers and opens up a whole new world of Internet connectivity. Think for a moment about IoT devices in basements deep underground, or even attached to buried pipes, or about those on islands that lie beyond the services of normal infrastructure. NetworkComputing cites further examples:

This is where NB-IoT and LPWA technology come in, because they can provide a long-range mobile connection with low power consumption. This combination of connectivity and low-power needs means a utility company can install connected flow meters around a water distribution network to automatically detect leaks without worrying about whether or not the sensor will work.

This is just one example of how technology can provide organizations with new possibilities of productivity. At Amaxx, we’re excited about how the IoT has the potential to dramatically change things, and with more than five million devices being added to the Internet every day, you’re going to want to fully leverage the IoT for your business. The best way to do this is to have a technology professional in your corner who has the know-how you need to succeed. Give us a call at 614-923-6700 and let’s discuss ways that technology can expand your business to new horizons.

A Look at the Glue That Holds the Internet of Things Together

b2ap3_thumbnail_radio_narrow_band_400.jpgWith millions of new and exciting devices connecting to the Internet every day, the Internet of Things is an IT trend that has the potential to dramatically improve society. Yet, the most significant change brought about by the IoT may actually come from devices that aren’t really that exciting.

Even though sexy devices like smartphones, smart cars, and smart homes are getting all the press when it comes to IoT, it’s the forgotten-about, behind-the-scenes devices which drive the IoT forward, like gas meters, water gauges, trash cans, soil moisture sensors, and more. Instead of having these devices be used to download the latest apps and post to social media, they’re primarily tasked with a singular purpose, like collecting and transmitting data so that work can get done more efficiently.

Devices like these actually present a unique technical challenge: how does one connect these devices to the Internet in such a way that little (if any) maintenance is required (like swapping out a device’s battery), and in locations without a reliable Internet connection? Having these devices achieve such requirements is necessary in order to enjoy the desired benefits. Otherwise, implementing small IoT devices on a wide scale wouldn’t be worth it, due to the expense of providing power, device maintenance, and Internet coverage to remote places. For example, installing an Internet-connected gas meter to a log cabin in the middle of the woods would prove most difficult due to poor 3G coverage, and it would be inconvenient to send a technician to service the meter. How then does one equip important IoT devices to hard-to-reach areas?

The answer lies in narrowband Internet of Things technology (NB-IoT), a development that allows for billions of obscure devices to be connected to the Internet, earning it the reputation by experts as “the glue that holds the IoT together.” NetworkComputing explains:

NB-IoT, originally called the cellular Internet of Things, is an emerging industry solution designed to enhance the global deployment of low-power wide area (LPWA) networks. Through licensed operator spectrum, in-band, guard band and standalone deployments, NB-IoT can provide connectivity to devices in hard to reach places without requiring much power to do so.

The ways that NB-IoT technology expands the IoT breaks down barriers and opens up a whole new world of Internet connectivity. Think for a moment about IoT devices in basements deep underground, or even attached to buried pipes, or about those on islands that lie beyond the services of normal infrastructure. NetworkComputing cites further examples:

This is where NB-IoT and LPWA technology come in, because they can provide a long-range mobile connection with low power consumption. This combination of connectivity and low-power needs means a utility company can install connected flow meters around a water distribution network to automatically detect leaks without worrying about whether or not the sensor will work.

This is just one example of how technology can provide organizations with new possibilities of productivity. At Amaxx, we’re excited about how the IoT has the potential to dramatically change things, and with more than five million devices being added to the Internet every day, you’re going to want to fully leverage the IoT for your business. The best way to do this is to have a technology professional in your corner who has the know-how you need to succeed. Give us a call at 614.486.3481 and let’s discuss ways that technology can expand your business to new horizons.

Use Conference Calls? Here are 3 Reasons to Drop Your Phone Company and Go With VoIP

b2ap3_thumbnail_new_voip_400.jpgConference calling has evolved with the years, and it’s a crucial service that’s needed by modern businesses. You probably find yourself in more meetings than you’d like to be in, but compared to the days before Voice over Internet Protocol existed, you have it pretty easy nowadays. In fact, VoIP is such a great tool that every business should look into its advantages.

VoIP is capable of transmitting your voice over the Internet, making it fantastic for communicating with both your internal team, and for your external communications. In fact, VoIP can be a great alternative to meeting face-to-face if your office has limited space available for meetings. Here are three benefits that your business can reap from using VoIP as your primary conference calling system.

VoIP Uses the Internet
Do you remember those days when you would have to conduct meetings over the phone if there wasn’t space available for a real-time meeting? Conference calling used to be, literally, a pain in the neck. Now, though, the Internet makes it infinitely easier to communicate, and VoIP capitalizes on this fact. By using the Internet to transmit voice signals, you can use your connection in a similar manner to traditional telephone systems. The biggest difference is that you won’t have to deal with all of the complex landline cabling that makes adding new extensions and lines so irritating (and expensive).

In general, cable companies tend to package together several services that your business might not necessarily want or need, which means that if you want to use their landline telephony services, you’d have to go all-in on something that you won’t need. With VoIP, you don’t need to worry about this. All VoIP needs is your Internet connection, so you won’t have to worry about unreasonably high charges… including long distance. If you find that you do need more services, VoIP solutions are flexible enough that you can easily add them as required.

This also means that limitations for trunks (the number of physical phone lines you have leaving the building) are a thing of the past. As you grow, your phone system won’t limit your team from making outbound calls.

VoIP Provides Mobility
Traditional phone systems are limiting in nature. You’re limited to your desk or office, and even if you have a cordless phone you can only travel so far from the receiver before it stops working. VoIP solutions utilize a web application or desktop software that transfers your voice over the Internet, so as long as you have access to the web, you can take full advantage of anywhere, anytime access. You can even use your smartphone with your VoIP solution, which makes it feel just like any normal telephone service. Depending on the VoIP solution, you can also just use a headset on your desktop or laptop.

If you choose to integrate VoIP, you could even let your team work remotely. By doing so, you’re opening your business up to untold opportunities for cost savings and increased productivity; not to mention the fact that your employees will be much happier and fulfilled with their daily duties.

VoIP Has Add-Ons
One of the best features that VoIP presents is its versatility with add-ons. VoIP often comes with video conferencing software, which allows users to emulate face-to-face meetings via video chat. By taking full advantage of VoIP and its various add-ons, you can essentially replicate an inter-office communication solution, even if your team is scattered across the country (or the world).

VoIP can change the way your business communicates for the better. Amaxx has the skills and expertise required to help your business integrate VoIP, from planning the implementation to the setup itself. For more information, give us a call at 614.486.3481 .