Find Out If Your Facebook Data Was Compromised By Cambridge Analytica

If you’re wondering if your Facebook data was compromised as part of the information Facebook shared with Cambridge Analytica, here’s where to go to find out.

Facebook is in the process of notifying people if their personal data was shared with Cambridge Analytica yesterday and today, but notifications can be fleeting and are not appearing consistently in the same place, depending on how you access Facebook.

To check if Facebook knows whether your data was given to Cambridge Analytics, log in to Facebook and visit this page … Read More

How To Use Cloudflare’s New DNS Service

Cloudflare has just introduced its new DNS service. Here’s how to take advantage of it to increase your internet speed and privacy.

Appropriately enough, Cloudflare announced the new service on the first of April (The DNS is 1.1.1.1 – 4 ones. 4/1).

DNS (Domain Name System) is an internet service that translates domain names (like techsupportalert.com) to IP (Internet Protocol) addresses so that they are more easily found. All websites on the internet have IP addresses, but for most of us, remembering a string of numbers is harder than remembering a domain name. It’s easier to remember techsupportalert.com than it would be to remember the IP address, which is 69.16.226.16.

Why would you want to change your DNS? There are several reasons, the main ones being speed, privacy, access to blocked sites, and security. Internet Service Providers (ISP’s) usually route all user internet traffic through their own DNS, whether you’re at home, at a coffee shop, or accessing the internet from another locale. It’s also how they collect data about where you go and what you do on the internet… Read More

Amazon is Shutting Down its Music Storage Subscription Service on April 30, 2018. Here’s What you Need to Do

Amazon’s Music Storage let customers upload and store up to 250 of their own MP3 files in a personal cloud library. Amazon is shuttering the service as of April 30th. Here’s how to keep your uploaded music files.

Last December Amazon announced it would be closing its Music Storage subscription plans (free and paid), the feature that lets users upload their own songs for storage to download or stream. They’ve now set April 30 as the day they’re shuttering the service.

To be clear, this impacts only music files that have been uploaded to Amazon. All Amazon Music digital purchases will continue to remain available for download and playback, and the shutdown doesn’t affect Prime Music or Amazon Music Unlimited in any way.
If you’ve ever used the Music Storage subscription service, you’ve likely received an email or notification from Amazon outlining all the details.

If you’ve stored music on Amazon you have two options to retain your music files…  Read More

Headphone Volume Too Quiet On Your PC? This Will Increase It.

If you like your music loud, and you stream from your PC, then you might have a problem.

Connect your PC’s sound card to some powered speakers or an amplifier, and you can push that volume as high as you want. If you like the floors to shake, you can do it!

But if you listen on headphones, then things are not so easy. Your sound card only pushes out a certain amount of power through that headphone socket, and your headphones don’t have an internal amplifier so you can’t get things any louder.

Right? Or is there a secret way to increase the headphone levels on your PC’s sound card?

Actually, there is! Check out a program called Equalizer APO. It’s a graphic equalizer and, once you’ve installed it, you can dial up your volume. Just be careful not to cause yourself any damage, though. It’s recommended that you don’t actually place your headphones over your ears while you experiment, just in case you turn things up a little too high.

Equalizer APO is free. The file is malware-free according to VirusTotal, and the download site is rated as reputable by Web of Trust. The download size is 8 MB.  Read More

Read 11,000 Pulp Magazines Online for Free

Pulp magazines (also called Pulp Fiction) were published from 1896 through the 1950’s. The Pulp Magazine Archive has digitized 11,120 pulp magazines that can be read online and is made available by the Internet Archive, a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, software, music, websites, and more.

There’s a wide variety of titles including Weird Tales, Worlds of IF Science Fiction, True Detective, Witchcraft and Sorcery, Captain Billy’s Whiz Bang, True Story, Adventure, and several more.

Titles are viewable by thumbnail or list, and can be sorted by title, date published, date archived, date reviewed, or by creator.
The search options are pretty extensive, you can search text or metadata, by year, by topic and subject, collection, or creator.

Reading the magazines is easy, visit the site, click on a title, and the magazine opens in a dual page mode. Click on either page of the magazine to go forward or backward a page. Under each magazine there’s a complete list of information including the title, content publication date, page count, collection, and other identifying information.

In keeping with the niche that pulp magazines occupied, some of the covers or content might not be safe for work or children. The science fiction titles are fine, and you’ll find tales by Isaac Asimov, Poul Anderson, Arthur C. Clarke, H. G. Wells, Theodore Sturgeon, Fritz Leiber, Larry Niven, Orson Scott Card, Clifford D. Simak and more. Other titles have differing levels of content.  Read More